Toro Y Moi Nods To Fellow Creatives With Playful Freelance

first_imgThe lyrics are a playful take on creativity and fitting in (or not) with pop culture. “I can’t tell if I’m hip or getting old./I can’t hear you, maybe you could change your tone./People tend to listen when they see your soul,” Bear sings. He explains the song’s meaning in a press release, via Pitchfork: “This record is a response to how disposable culture has become and how it affects creativity. While listening, you might pay attention or ignore—either way that’s ok, this is music for a creative mind.”We have heard different sides of Bear as he explores his sound across his albums, and in this song and video it feels as if we are getting a glimpse into his mind, an authentic, perhaps artistically-curated look at who he is a person and, of course, as an artist. He is confidently telling the world who he is, playfully mocking his disregard for being cool and preference to simply be himself, no matter what other people are doing or trying to do.  “In this post-Instagram world, when we’re not really sure where the subculture is, everyone is [trying] to be ‘normal,’ though I feel like it’s just sort of aligned with where I’ve always been,” Bear explained to Vogue. The artist says of his latest release, which is the lead single from the upcoming Outer Peace, “now I feel like I’m talking to anyone who is creative”Ana YglesiasGRAMMYs Oct 23, 2018 – 2:18 pm Chaz Bear, best known for his indie electro-pop outfit, Toro Y Moi, is a creative at heart and he continues to show it on his latest release on Oct. 23, “Freelance.” The upbeat electro-funk track is the lead single on his newly announced sixth Toro Y Moi album, Outer Peace, out on Jan. 18.The song’s playful lyrics and music video, complete with an aesthetically-pleasing color palate, highlight the artist’s creativity—and is a nod to his fans’ creative sides as well. He has released five studio albums as Toro Y Moi since his debut LP, Causers Of This, in 2010, exploring and redefining his sound with each new body of work, including on his other side projects and collaborative albums.”I feel like I’ve found who I’m talking to with my music,” the artist told Vogue. “For the longest time, I thought I was talking to music lovers or even a specific age group. But now I feel like I’m talking to anyone who is creative.”We see this shine through in simple-yet-artsy music video, directed by Harry Israelson, which shows Bear making music at a (perfectly organized) work-from-home desk setup, complete with an exercise ball as a chair, then dancing in a not-so-chic camo-print sweatshirt and Teva sandals during a photo shoot, singing “No more shoes and socks, I only rock sandals.” Twitter Email Toro Y Moi Nods To Fellow Creatives With Playful “Freelance” Toro Y Moi Is Speaking To Fellow Creatives toro-y-moi-nods-fellow-creatives-playful-freelancecenter_img News Facebook NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Aug 25, 2015 – 11:36 am Toro Y Moi Likes Catching Listeners Off-Guard Back in 2015 the Recording Academy sat down with Bear for a telling interview, where he explained his love for music and intentional efforts to not get pigeon-holed in a specific genre or sound. He shares, “Music’s always going to be fun for me…I’m go to try my hardest to not get tired of it. I’m going to always change.”The world will have to wait until January 2019 to see exactly what this new flavor of Toro Y Moi sounds and looks like fully-fleshed out in album,. Until then, let’s jam out to his many currently-released sounds while contemplating who we are in the world, perhaps even catching him on tour.Beirut Share Story Behind “Gallipoli” From Upcoming Album, Announce TourRead morelast_img read more

Whos Who in the Baltimore Mayoral Race

first_imgJoshua HarrisCommunity organizer and communications worker Joshua Harris outlines his solutions to things like housing, energy and social justice on his campaign website. In the speech he gave announcing his candidacy for mayor, he said that some of the city’s woes stem from a communication breakdown between city leaders and residents “[In communications], the traditional and older model is send a message-receiver, and I also believe that that is the common mode that the city operates under . . . we are the sender, we want to get [the message] out, and you receive it. We also now have to incorporate the feedback,” he said. Officially filed: yes Baltimore’s primary election is not until April 26, but a major milestone is coming up. The candidates looking to become the city’s next mayor must file their paperwork with the State Board of Elections by February 3. Here are the current frontrunners. Some of the candidates had not officially filed as of press time. (The following candidates appear in alphabetical order.) Carl StokesOn his website, the city councilmember writes that he believes that investing in neighborhoods and redeveloping abandoned housing are keys to making Baltimore better. He underscores this statement with a reprint of the speech he gave when he announced his candidacy back in December. “When I am mayor, there will be new standards for Tax Increment Financing. You want help? You show that you will benefit a community – parks, jobs, capital improvements. And the community will decide what they need before any TIF is granted. We will invest in neighborhoods and there will be accountability,” the speech reads. Officially filed: no Patrick GutierreGutierrez is a former bank executive who believes he can take the skills he learned in that job, and use them to make Baltimore better. “Seeing the dysfunction in city government and knowing my background as an operations manager was specifically to go in and address the same problems that city government has. You know, there’s no accountability anywhere, there’s no transparency, the communication is poor and when you have those things you get the results that we’re getting,” he said in an interview with the AFRO. On his website, he has posted his five steps to a better police department – a plan that calls for body cameras, a better civilian review board and incentives for officers to live in the communities they police in, among other things. Officially filed: yes Elizabeth EmbryEmbry, who is currently on leave from her job as Chief of the Criminal Division for the Attorney General, says that she will roll out a comprehensive plan detailing what changes she’d make as mayor in the coming weeks. In an interview with the AFRO, she said her experience prosecuting crime could be a big asset to the city. “I’ve seen what can work, but what I’ve also seen in the criminal justice system is what happens when every system does not work. To me, the criminal justice system is what you see when everything fails,” she said. Officially filed: no Sheila DixonIn early January, Dixon released a four-point plan aimed at making the city safer. In it, she suggests ways to stop gun violence, make changes to the police department and make city agencies more unified. “This has been a year of profound hardship for our city. With the painful loss of Freddie Gray, the entrenched conflicts that his death brought to the surface, and the horrifying spike in violence that followed, we all strive to find words of healing and actions to match. But that takes leadership, and that is what I’m offering the citizens of this city,” she writes on her website. Officially filed: nocenter_img David WarnockThe businessman and philanthropist told the AFRO that he is working on a comprehensive plan detailing the changes he’d make as mayor, with help from people like former Maryland State Superintendent of Schools Nancy Grasmick and Community College of Baltimore County president Sandra Kurtinitis. “I think this election is about ideas, it’s about change and it’s about whether we’re ok with business as usual,” he said. “There are tactical things that are in her [Sheila Dixon’s] plan and in Nick’s [Mosby] plan that we’ll all do. The question is, are you really going to create sustainable significant change for the city?” Officially filed: yes Nick MosbyNick Mosby, who currently serves on the Baltimore City Council and is the husband of State Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby, has issued a 15-point plan of what he would do as mayor called “Connecting the Dots.” The plan targets things like education, public safety and jobs. “City Hall’s job is to Connect the Dots that define our wellbeing, providing an honest, reliable vision that guides our residents along their individual paths to shared success,” he writes on his website. Officially filed: no Catherine PughThis is the current state senator’s second run for mayor of Baltimore. She has also served on the Baltimore City Council and was appointed to the Maryland General Assembly, House of Delegates. On her website, she points to her long career in politics as proof she’d be a good mayor for the city. She says she has passed over 150 pieces of legislation. Officially filed: yes Calvin YoungIn a September interview with the AFRO, Young said that his work as a jet engine engineer and as National Chairperson for the National Society of Black Engineers could help him lead the city. He said that as mayor, he would focus on education, removing lead from city homes and improving the relationship between the police and he community. “I’m running to provide a counterpoint to what we’ve heard about our city for decades – crime, drugs, homicides – that does not have to be what Baltimore is about moving forward,” he said. Officially filed: yeslast_img read more