QPR fans on Twitter react to Holloway’s comments about Eze

first_imgEbere Eze has impressed for QPR in recent games © Joe Giddens/PA WireSome QPR fans on Twitter have been critical of comments made by manager Ian Holloway about Ebere Eze.The young forward impressed again for Rangers on Monday, scoring their third goal in a 4-1 win against Norwich.Holloway praised Eze but has continued to insist that the teenager must improve the defensive side of his game.Holloway has also suggested that although Eze currently operates mainly in the number 10 role, in the longer term he could play out wide.Some Rangers fans felt Holloway got it spot on, but others were unhappy with his comments. Why does Olli have to come out with comments like this? As he whistles to the song “All about me…”— Mark (@M_ImpsW12) April 3, 2018No no no no no no no no no NO!!!! https://t.co/BtciOgJnCK— Ash. (@QPR_AMA) April 3, 2018Things like this really annoy me.We have an absolute talent, the best on the ball since Adel, and we are trying to make him tackle back and battle!!That ISNT his game.Let him express himself, play to his strengths and put a Derry like player in to tackle for him!!! https://t.co/TmQwvG3HTI— Jeff (@JabHookNQPR) April 3, 2018If Holloway remains in charge he’ll ruin Eze. Stuff like this is why we should part ways with him in the summer. #QPR https://t.co/9oIeZvPICh— King of Zamunda (@HRHJaffeJoffer) April 3, 2018 #QPR Keep the criticism / coaching/ teaching on the training pitch please Ollie. Not too much to shout about this season but our second half performance was great. Don’t feed twitter…please 😩 https://t.co/K4oW6LlYjJ— Gary Bevan (@WhiteCity256) April 3, 2018 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndolast_img read more

Local Roundup: McKinleyville offense erupts for 10 runs to beat Arcata for third time in three days

first_imgArcata >> The McKinleyville Panthers softball team scored 10 runs on 11 hits and took advantage of six Arcata errors to beat the Tigers 10-4 on Thursday at Arcata High School.Tied at two in the top of the third inning, McKinleyville scored three runs — highlighted by back-to-back doubles from Lily Thiesfeld and Ashley Stockwell — giving Mack a 5-2 lead.The Panthers offense didn’t stop there, as Mack scored five runs in the sixth inning, including an inside-the-park home run by Theisfeld, who …last_img

Do Fossil Counts Match Sediment Counts?

first_imgIf evolution is true, the number of species coming and going should track the number of rock layers in which they are fossilized, at least roughly.  The more sediments per unit time, the more new genera should arise within them.  Shanan E. Peters (U of Michigan) decided to test this “novel” approach with marine fossils (the most abundant in the fossil record) over most of the geologic column, from Cambrian to Pliocene, and did indeed find a correlation.  He wrote his conclusions in PNAS.1    Peters compared two databases: one that counted genera of marine organisms in the worldwide geologic column, and one that counted rock sections in the geologic column in the USA.  (A section is a record of continuous sedimentation bounded by gaps, or unconformities.)  First, he graphed genus richness against rock quantity; these measurements correlated well until the Cretaceous, when they diverged sharply.  The divergence, he explained, could have been a statistical artifact of sampling called the “pull of the recent”; i.e., the tendency for recent epochs to be better represented than ancient ones.  That’s OK, he explained; one would expect the correlations to be seen better at macro rather than micro scales.  Second, he graphed first and last appearances of genera against the bottoms and tops of rock sections.  These correlated fairly well for extinctions (r=0.75), but not as well for originations of genera (r=0.54 or less).  “This finding means,” he tells us, “that the average longevity of a genus in the fossil record is comparable with the average duration of a sedimentary section.  In fact, the entire frequency distribution of genus longevities is remarkably similar to that of section durations.”  Third, he compared genus turnover with section turnover and also found similar positive correlation, though with some data points as prominent outliers.  In his concluding discussion, he tried to explain what these correlations mean.These results demonstrate that the temporal distribution of genus first and last occurrences in the marine animal fossil record is intimately related to the temporal continuity and quantity of sedimentary rock.  Determining why this result is the case is more challenging than demonstrating that it is so. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Since the two databases (genus counts and section counts) were presumed “as independent as two data sets that share the same timescale could possibly be,” he felt the correlations, rough as they were, indicated something significant.  Either the results were artifacts of preservation bias (the luck of the fossilization process), or had a common-cause relationship.  The former, he argued, seems unlikely: “Thus, if stratigraphic correlation and the shared timescale are the only reasons for statistical similarity, then virtually all temporal patterns derived from the geologic record must be little more than methodological artifacts of binning and correlation.  This possibility seems extremely unlikely (although quantifying the magnitudes of the statistical contributions of these factors is very important).”  That being agreed, which explanation – selection bias or common cause – best explains the data?Assuming that macroevolutionary patterns derived from genus first and last occurrences have the potential to be meaningful in a biological sense, the task then becomes to explain why patterns in the genus fossil record are closely duplicated by analogous patterns in the sedimentary rock record.  As discussed above, there are two possibilities, (i) preservation bias and (ii) shared forcing mechanisms (common cause).He showed that the latter possibility makes better predictions, but does admit one caveat: “because only unconformity and rock quantity biases are being measured here, it is possible that facies biases and/or asymmetries in environmental preservation within sedimentary sequences are causing the stronger section-genus extinction correlation”; i.e., the beginning and end of the story don’t always reveal what happened in the middle.  Nevertheless, he felt confident that taxonomists and geologists had not conspired to bias the conclusions: “it seems unlikely that the work of hundreds of taxonomists has been so nonrandom as to render the survivorship patterns of >32,000 genera from across the tree of life little more than a quantification of the structure of the sedimentary rock record.”    Why, however, would the genus extinction count correlate with the end of the rock section better than the origination count correlate with the beginning?  Aha, the common-cause hypothesis predicted it would.  The answer is in the way evolution works:Under the common-cause hypothesis, however, genera are expected to originate early in a sedimentary basin’s history as new habitats and environments expand and to go extinct abruptly when environmental changes eliminate the basin environments altogether.  Thus, similar average durations for sections and genera as well as corresponding peaks and troughs in rates of origination and extinction are expected.  Interestingly, the common-cause hypothesis also predicts that the genus-section extinction correlation should be stronger than the genus-section origination correlation because genus extinction can match the timing of rapid environmental shifts that result in section truncation, whereas genus origination may not be capable of responding instantly to the macroevolutionary opportunities afforded by basin expansion.  This possibility is sensitive to choice of timescale, but it is supported by analyses that find less empirical support for pulsed genus origination [i.e., punctuated equilibria] than for pulsed genus extinction at the same level of temporal resolution in the Phanerozoic.The remainder of Peters’ discussion delved into the meaning of these correlations for theories of environmental forcing of macroevolution and timing of mass extinctions.  He favored gradualism over saltation for origination of species, and discounted the need for major catastrophes to explain extinction rates.  He defended the challenging concept that “much of the macroevolutionary history of marine animals is driven by processes related to the formation and destruction of sedimentary basins.”  If some evolutionists believe that extinctions and explosions of biological diversity can be forced by a meteorite impact, for instance, why not consider the possibility that macroevolutionary change can also be forced by slower geological changes?  Thus, “it would seem prudent to revisit some of the classic unifying hypotheses that are grounded in the effects of continually operating processes and to reevaluate seriously the extent to which unusual or episodic events are required to explain the macroevolutionary history of marine animals.”    In conclusion, he admitted that more work will need to be done to rule out taxonomic biases.  These “remain a potential obfuscator of macroevolutionary patterns in all global taxonomic databases,” he says; though he has shown some correlation, he is not trying to push his point too far.  “Further quantifying the relationships between the large-scale temporal and spatial structure of the geologic record and the distribution of fossil occurrences within this structure will be important,” he ended, “in overcoming persistent sampling biases and in testing the extent to which common-cause mechanisms have dominated the macroevolutionary history of marine animals.”1Shanan E. Peters, “Geological constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals, “ Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, August 30, 2005, vol. 102, no. 35, 12326-12331, published online before print August 16, 2005, 10.1073/pnas.0502616102.This lengthy entry is exhibited here to show how evolutionists can fool themselves into thinking the observations support Charlie’s tall tale.  In the first place, he used evolutionary assumptions to calibrate evolutionary assumptions: the “common timescale” of both databases is the geologic column, a theoretical arrangement of global sediments built on the assumption of evolution and millions of years.  This is reminiscent of the joke about the church bell ringer who set his watch by the clock tower on the parliament building, only to find out that the clock tower maintenance man set his clock by the church bell.  Second, the correlations are only marginally significant.  His charts show severe outliers.  Sometimes the anomalous data points have an important story to tell.  Third, his use of gap-bound rock sections only concentrates on the beginning and ending of continuously-deposited sediments.  In the old Dr. Seuss book The Cat in the Hat, the first and last pages of the book, showing the children contentedly at ease in a clean living room, belies all the chaos and commotion that occurred in the middle.  Last, Peters trusted in the “if you build it, they will come” theory of evolution.  He didn’t explain how new genera of marine organisms would “emerge” when the sea level rose or fell; he just assumed that whenever organisms are given a safe haven, presto!  macroevolution happens.  In short, the evolutionary story rigged, controlled, operated and guaranteed the outcome of the entire analysis.  Evolution is a self-fulfilling prophecy.    For a side dish, consider what EurekAlert recently reported: most scientific papers are wrong.  Whether from financial interest, prejudice, unseen biases, conflict of interest, peer pressure or the desire to prove relationships that don’t exist (false positives), “There is increasing concern that in modern research, false findings may be the majority or even the vast majority of published research claims.”  Iain Murray, writing for Competitive Enterprise Institute, reflected on what this means – much authoritative-sounding science talk is inconclusive and, frankly, politically or selfishly motivated.  The paper by Peters, reviewed here, fits the description.  For all its graphs and jargon, it is trying to prove something that isn’t necessarily true, built on a bias for a certain brand of Darwinian evolution.    Even if there were a correlation between sediment counts and genus counts, could there be a non-evolutionary explanation?  Naturally.  In a flood scenario, for instance, more genera are likely to be buried in sediments corresponding to the volume of the material.  The first appearance of a genus would either represent the chance placement in the layers or a mechanical artifact of the burial process, such as liquefaction or hydrodynamic sorting.  Extinction would occur, but not origination by evolution.  No great time periods need transpire.  Since Peters’ radar screen was not tuned to this possibility, he missed it.(Visited 29 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

2010: A Big Year For Remote Web Workers

first_imgThis year proved to be a strong one for online employment, as more and more took to the Web to find work, where an increasing number of jobs are for employers in other geographic areas, according to a report released by Elance.Elance reported its one-millionth job listing, as an annually-growing number of job seekers and freelancers use the site to find work. In total, the site saw 375,000 new listings in 2010, a 40% increase from last year. Web workers are cumulatively now earning over $100 million per year through the site. While these trends are specific to Elance, they tell us something about the job market as a whole, which is clearly becoming more mobile and distributed as technology continues to enable that shift. Elance highlights the explosion of mobile computing by reporting that the number of businesses posting mobile development jobs grew by 98% this year. In one of its more interesting breakdowns, the report outlines which skills grew in demand this year and which ones appear to be on their way out. Search engine marketing topped the list of “hot” skills for 2010, followed by iPhone development, Google App Engine, HTML5 and affiliate marketing. Decreasing in demand were skills related to direct marketing, BlackBerrys, Amazon Web Services, DHTML and Telemarketing. Photo by Flickr user jsogo john paul titlow Related Posts Tags:#Analysis#biz A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

19 days agoWales coach Ryan Giggs: Man Utd must keep buying

first_imgWales coach Ryan Giggs: Man Utd must keep buyingby Paul Vegas19 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWales coach Ryan Giggs says Manchester United need FIVE new players to bring the glory days back to Old Trafford.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s under-fire side have won just five of their last 22 matches, and are winless in ten away games, ahead of today’s crunch Prem clash at Newcastle.Giggs told The Sun: “I see what Ole is doing and I support that. He’s brought in three players but he probably needs seven or eight.”So he needs another four or five. But you can’t do that over one transfer window, so you have to be patient because it will be slow.“What he is trying to do was much needed. He needs time.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

17 days agoFerguson declares ex-Arsenal boss Wenger ‘an absolute legend’

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ferguson declares ex-Arsenal boss Wenger ‘an absolute legend’by Paul Vegas17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United icon Sir Alex Ferguson has declared Arsene Wenger “an absolute legend” as the former Arsenal boss enjoyed a special night in his honour.On Monday night, Wenger was named a ‘Legend of Football’ at the annual Nordoff Robbins charity award dinner.Addressing his old adversary via video, Ferguson said: “The career you had as a manager at Arsenal was absolutely fantastic – an absolute legend.”I loved the competition against you. We had some great times and it’s wonderful you’re getting this award tonight. So good luck, my blessing with you.”Ferguson himself has been a past recipient of the ‘Legends of Football’ award, which has been handed out since 1996. last_img read more

WHATS SHOOTING IN ONTARIO – AS OF MAR2318 – LINKS BY DGC

first_imgAdvertisement WHAT’S SHOOTING IN ONTARIO – AS OF MAR-23-18DGC (Director’s Guild of Canada) Hotlist – CLICK HERE (37 page PDF)OMDC (Ontario Media Development Corporation) MEDIA LIST – CLICK HERE (3-page PDF) Facebook ACTRA – CLICK HEREIATSE 873 – CLICK HERE.LOOKING FOR A JOB?  CHECK OUT OUR CASTING, JOB & CREW NOTICESCASTING A PRODUCTION? HIRING CREW? POST YOUR NOTICE HERETO VIEW OR POST CASTING NOTICES: CLICK HERETO VIEW OR POST CREW & JOB NOTICES: CLICK HERE.ARE YOU A FREELANCER?  CREW?  DO YOU WORK BEHIND THE SCENES?ARE YOU A PRODUCTION COMPANY?DO YOU PROVIDE A SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY?ADD YOUR COMPANY (OR YOUR SERVICES) TO THE PRODUCTION DIRECTORYRegister & List your company in the FREE eBOSS PRODUCTION DIRECTORYCLICK HERE.DEALS AND DISCOUNTSCheck out our deals page for discounts on events, restaurants, industry services, health and fitness, auto services and much more – CLICK HERE.FOLLOW eBOSS CANADA ON SOCIAL MEDIA  The Entertainment Business One-Stop ShopFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/eboss.canada/Twitter: https://twitter.com/eBOSSCanadaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/eBOSSCanada/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ebosscanada.[DOWNLOAD-THE-APP] Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

SNCLavalin reports 781M Q1 profit revenue up on Atkins deal last year

first_imgMONTREAL – SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. reported a first-quarter profit of $78.1 million as its revenue climbed with the acquisition of British engineering firm WS Atkins last year.The company says the profit amounted to 44 cents per diluted share for the quarter, down from $89.7 million or 60 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue totalled $2.43 billion, up from $1.85 billion.On an adjusted basis, SNC says it earned $136 million or 77 cents per share, up from $105.1 million or 70 cents per share a year ago.SNC’s adjusted profit from its engineering and construction business amounted to 51 cents per share, up from 40 cents per share a year ago.SNC completed its acquisition of WS Atkins last summer for roughly $3.6 billion.Companies in this story: (TSX:SNC)last_img

Fort St John crosswalks to display walk symbol by default

first_imgThis means that for pedestrians walking along primary roads, the walk signal will be displayed by default when the traffic light turns green, without the need to push the activation button. For pedestrians crossing primary roads, even if the activation button is pressed after the light has turned green, the walk signal will be displayed during that light cycle, provided the minimum green timing is not exceeded. The changes mean that it will be less likely that pedestrians will need to wait for a traffic light to complete a full cycle before the walk signal displays allowing them to cross the road. However, Shopland said that advance left turn signals will also display before the pedestrian signal if they have been activated by the presence of a vehicle in the left turn lane.Shopland also said in his report that a chirper will be added to the crosswalk at the intersection of 100 Ave. and 96 St. He added that with the change to a rest in walk state, the unit will chirp continually, and staff are investigating what will be required to activate this feature only when the button is pushed. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Crosswalks in Fort St. John will be getting a bit more pedestrian-friendly in the near future after councillors voted in favour of modifying intersections to display the ‘walk’ symbol by default.Earlier this month, Council voted in favour of a motion by Mayor Lori Ackerman for staff to look at ways of making intersections in Fort St. John more pedestrian-friendly. The Mayor’s motion was made in the wake of recommendations from Urban Systems on how to improve the quality of life in Fort St. John during the winter months.At Monday’s council meeting, Integrated Services General Manager Victor Shopland recommended that staff modify the traffic control signals to allow for non-actuated coordinated and pedestrian recall walk signals on primary streets, as well as pedestrian-activated walk signals on side streets. A pedestrian in Fort St. John misses a green light in Fort St. John. New changes to traffic light operation mean that the walk signal will be displayed by default along primary roads. Photo by Chris Newton. A green traffic light in Fort St. John with the advance left turn signal lit. Photo by Chris Newtonlast_img read more

4th after USA Russia China to enter space super league

first_imgNEW DELHI: After shooting down a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite with its indigenously developed Anti-Satellite (A-SAT) weapon, India is now a reckoning space power, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in his address to the nation.On March 27, at 11:16 am, India successfully launched its A-SAT weapon that targetted an Indian satellite which had been decommissioned and was orbiting an LEO at a height of 300 km from Earth’s surface. DRDO’s Ballistic Missile Interceptor, a part of the ongoing ballistic missile defence programme, was deployed. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThis ‘technological mission’ was carried out by DRDO from Dr A P J Abdul Kalam Island launch complex in Odisha. The team of scientists was able to accomplish the task of locating, destroying and confirming the destruction of said satellite within three minutes. Mission Shakti deserves celebration as this is the first time that India has tested and successfully demonstrated its capability to interdict and intercept a satellite in outer space based on complete indigenous technology. Rightly, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said that this is ‘a proud moment’ for Indians. A-SAT weapons play a crucial role in locating, intercepting and destroying incoming satellite that may threaten national security. However, the sphere of space weapons is contentious. Strict guidelines are enforced under the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, of which India is a signatory. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayThe treaty strongly prohibits the use of weapons of mass destruction in space. However, with its A-SAT weapon, India has been careful to not overstep any points of the treaty. India has also expressed support to the substantive consideration of Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space (PAROS) in the Conference on Disarmament, where it has been on agenda since 1982. Clearly, India’s intent is less offensive and more a defensive tool of strengthening national security and propelling the development of greater space technology. Earlier, China’s test in 2007 received widespread criticism from the global community, which iterated that the Dragon’s attempt to launch A-SAT weapons had “serious consequences of engaging in the militarisation of space”.last_img read more