VIDEO Wilmington Man Shares His Kidney Donation Story Encourages Others To Become

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — In the latest episode of “Where’s Wilmington,” host Lisa Kapala interviews Steve Averhart and Wilmington’s Mike Murphy, both of New England Donor Services, on the importance of organ donation.The town recently began flying a “Donate Life” flag outside of Town Hall at Murphy’s request.Watch the 20-minute episode, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-west-1.dream.io/wilmington/9/1/f/d/9/9/91fd998c-5b5b-4c21-9fef-437224ef4a5c1525887897.955%2B30670596.998%40castus4-wilmington%2B15259622301525961477526698.vod.720p.Where%27s%20Wilmington__%20Ep.%20125%20Steve%20Averhart%20%26%20Mike%20Murphy%20Organ%20Donation.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Learn About The New Wilmington Police Explorers ProgramIn “Videos”VIDEO: Meet Wilmington Recreation’s New Program Coordinator Bret SawinIn “Videos”VIDEO: Learn About The Mill City Eagles, A Local Semi-Pro Football Team, & Meet GM Zachary Swale, Of WilmingtonIn “Videos”last_img read more

Do barchans birth or collide Two papers have different stories

first_imgPhotograph of Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley looking toward the Cottonwood Mountains from the north west arm of Star Dune (the largest dune in the area — Death Valley National Park, California. Credit: Wikipedia © 2013 Phys.org Journal information: Geology Large dunes birth or “calve” smaller dunes. After sand dunes get big enough, they calve off smaller dunes that keep them from blowing up to infinite size. The baby dune travels down one of its parent’s horns and buds off. The team simulated “calving” dunes and recreated real-world barchan patterns for their study. Their findings were published online earlier this month in the journal Geology. The paper, by Stacey Worman and colleagues, is titled “Modeling Emergent Large-Scale Structures of Barchan Dune Fields.” The authors stated that “This work supports the hypothesis that calving exerts a first-order control on field-scale phenomena; it prevents individual dunes from growing without bound, as single-dune analyses suggest, and allows the formation of roughly realistic, persistent dune field patterns.”A different view appears this month, however, in Geophysical Research Letters where Mathieu Génois of Paris Diderot University and coauthors flesh out a picture of clashing, not calving, dunes. Collisions control dune field behavior. Looking at barchan formations, they said colliding and breaking apart keep the fields from growing out of control. If two barchan dunes collide they merge into one crescent or split up into multiple smaller barchans.They wrote, “Here we use an agent-based model with elementary rules of sand redistribution during collisions to access the full dynamics of very large barchan fields. We tune the dune field density by changing the sand load/lost ratio and follow the transition between dilute fields, where barchans barely interact, and dense fields, where dune collisions control and stabilize the dune field.”In 2012, there were signs that Genois and research colleagues were interested in examining the nature of crescent-shaped dunes. That year, the paper was published, “When Dunes Move Together, Structure of Deserts Emerges.””In contrast with the layman’s view, ” they wrote, “not all deserts are vast sand seas. Depending on the variability of the local winds, sand dunes can adopt various shapes. When viewed from above, they mimic large stars, long linear ridges or crescent structures. The-crescent shaped dune, called barchan is a prototypical model of sand dune dynamics…” Citation: Do barchans birth or collide? Two papers have different stories (2013, September 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-barchans-birth-collide-papers-stories.html (Phys.org) —Geologists continue to puzzle over the how and why of crescent-shaped sand dunes called barchans, found on Earth and on Mars. Barchans can form on the seafloor and on ice, as well as deserts. How do they happen? Why do they not lose their shape? Scientists seeking to understand what keeps these formations going have two recently published papers that can offer detailed explanations of how barchan dune fields can exist, and why they are arranged the way they are. The hitch is that the two papers disagree. A recently published paper by researchers from Duke University say that this is a birthing process, where large dunes give birth to smaller ones. More information: www.sciencenews.org/view/gener … _dune_fields_somehowarxiv.org/abs/1211.7238v1 , Geophysical Research Letters Explore further Image: Great Sandy Desert, Australia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more