Soldotna Mayor Responds To Kenai River Water Listing

first_imgIn the letter from Mayor Anderson he states that the Soldotna City Council was not given their designated time in order to submit comments to the ADEC prior to the KRSMA Board submitting their letter on January 22. According to the ADEC, the Kenai River was listed as not meeting all water quality criteria due to increased turbidity. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-Soldotna-responds-to-ADEC-letter.mp3VmJennifer-on-Soldotna-responds-to-ADEC-letter.mp300:00RPd Mayor Anderson in the letter to Ted Wellman, Chairman KRSMA Board: “It is unreasonable to ask our representative to take a position or express an opinion for the City Council without providing opportunity for our elected body to evaluate and provide feedback. In this case, there was time given that the comments were not due until January 29. As chairman, you chose not to allow comment on a letter you drafted and submitted on January 22, 2018, a full week prior to the due date.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Soldotna Mayor Nels Anderson has drafted a letter to the Kenai River Special Management Advisory Board (KRSMAB) in response to a letter submitted by the board to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation regarding the Kenai River being listed as an impaired water body. According to Ostrander the City of Kenai was also not given the opportunity to review the letter submitted by the KRSMA Board prior to it being submitted to the ADEC, and the comments made in the letter do not reflect those of the city. Ostrander was granted permission at the Kenai City Council meeting on Wednesday, February 21 to submit his letter. Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander will also be presenting a letter addressed to the ADEC in response to the Kenai River Special Management Advisory Boards comment letter that was submitted to the ADEC on January 22.last_img read more

VIDEO Wilmington Man Shares His Kidney Donation Story Encourages Others To Become

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — In the latest episode of “Where’s Wilmington,” host Lisa Kapala interviews Steve Averhart and Wilmington’s Mike Murphy, both of New England Donor Services, on the importance of organ donation.The town recently began flying a “Donate Life” flag outside of Town Hall at Murphy’s request.Watch the 20-minute episode, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-west-1.dream.io/wilmington/9/1/f/d/9/9/91fd998c-5b5b-4c21-9fef-437224ef4a5c1525887897.955%2B30670596.998%40castus4-wilmington%2B15259622301525961477526698.vod.720p.Where%27s%20Wilmington__%20Ep.%20125%20Steve%20Averhart%20%26%20Mike%20Murphy%20Organ%20Donation.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Learn About The New Wilmington Police Explorers ProgramIn “Videos”VIDEO: Meet Wilmington Recreation’s New Program Coordinator Bret SawinIn “Videos”VIDEO: Learn About The Mill City Eagles, A Local Semi-Pro Football Team, & Meet GM Zachary Swale, Of WilmingtonIn “Videos”last_img read more

Economy in focus as PM Modi begins second term without key aide

first_imgPM Modi won a massive mandate in the general election that ended this month after focusing his campaign on national security.ReutersPrime Minister Narendra Modi will take his oath of office on Thursday along with his ministers, though he suffered a setback at the start of his second term when key aide and finance minister Arun Jaitley opted out of the next government.The swearing-in ceremony at the forecourt of the colonial-era presidential palace Rashtrapati Bhawan will be attended by thousands of guests including Bollywood stars and leaders of neighbours including Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.PM Modi won a massive mandate in the general election that ended this month after focusing his campaign on national security, as tension with old rival Pakistan shot up over a deadly militant attack on security forces in the disputed region of Kashmir.Pakistan was not invited to the inauguration.India is proud of all those brave men and women martyred in the line of duty, PM Modi said after visiting a war memorial near parliament on Thursday. Our government will leave no stone unturned to safeguard India’s unity and integrity. National security is our priority.Many ministers who are also senior members of the ruling alliance are expected to keep their place in the government. But changes in their departments are likely, especially after Arun Jaitley wrote to PM Modi on Wednesday asking to be kept out due to health reasons.Narendra Modi and the chief of Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), Amit Shah, could also promote many fresh faces to reward good electoral performance, mainly in the east of the country where they have traditionally been weak.Amit Shah himself is tipped to take up a role in the government, though some political analysts say he could stay on as BJP president to steer the party towards a majority in the upper house of parliament after dominating the lower house.Nearly 8,000 people, including leaders of the decimated opposition bloc, are expected to attend the ceremony that will fete the incredible rise of 68-year-old Modi, the son of a tea seller.The BJP now controls 303 of the 545 seats in the lower house of parliament, paving the way for Modi to possibly attempt controversial land and labour reforms amid concerns that Asia’s third-largest economy is faltering.This week, two major industrial bodies called on the new government to urgently take steps to bolster the economy, which grew 6.6 per cent in the three months to December — the slowest pace in five quarters.PM Modi pushed through important reforms such as a unified goods and services tax and bankruptcy law in his first five years in power but faced flak for failing to create enough jobs for millions of people seeking employment, rising farm distress and lacklustre economic growth. India’s main opposition Congress party, meanwhile, is fighting to stay relevant after being overwhelmed in two straight general elections.Its president, Rahul Gandhi, has offered to resign and on Thursday, the party said it would not send its spokespeople on television debates for a month as it analyses its latest defeat.last_img read more

Witnesses Display Injustices to Councilmembers Regarding the Police

first_imgHoward University Business School in Northwest D.C. was where complaints were presented to District council members Oct. 8. In the school’s auditorium, many citizens vented their views regarding negative incidents with police while others listened to their stories.Council member Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6).Council member Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6), chair of the Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety, organized the public oversight hearing to hear complaints entitled “The Metropolitan Police Department: Stop and Contact Policies and Procedures.”“Before the Council broke for recess, I committed to an oversight hearing to review Metropolitan Police Department practices, specifically the methods law enforcement uses to stop and detain people in D.C.,”Wells said in a statement. “All residents should be able to expect and trust that law enforcement will protect and treat us all equally, safely, and fairly.”Hearing topics included stop and frisk, jump outs, traffic stops, and use of SWAT-like teams.Councilmembers Anita Bonds, David Grosso (At-Large members) and Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward5) shared the panel with Wells. The NAACP, the Urban League, the American Civil Liberties Union and District citizens, gave testimonies.Kymone Freeman, a black male, demanded council members have a legitimate citizens’ review board to oversee complaints regarding police conduct. require a significant number of police live in the communities they watch, and have any officer who shoots an unarmed person indicted, arrested, and convicted.Freeman said he was tired of “dead bodies over and over again,” then candidly shared his experiences with the police.Jamal Mohammad of We Act Radio said social media displayed what has been happening for decades. “We have different realities from the world (speaking of Black men in particular) with different consequences,” Mohammad said.The topic of the 1974 Stop and Frisk Law was raised but no indication was given as to what it was based on or if it was a District law for police.“The 1974 laws do not work today in modern society,” Bonds said.  She read data from the police department and concluded it may be different for citizens. Bonds later remarked when the hearing was over, “Some of the things my son has said to me, I was horrified.” She was open to suggestions on how to improve the relationship between citizens and the police.“We need more transparency,” McDuffie added. “People may be used to what’s going on and it becomes a way of life.” He encouraged citizens to file a complaint and gave a negative experience he encountered with police.Another hearing on the police department will convene 11:30 am. Oct. 27 at the John A. Wilson Building with Police Chief Cathy Lanier.last_img read more

Fears of Gentrification Shadow Northeast Community Development

first_imgSondra Phillips-Gilbert is a second term commissioner for the Rosedale Community,A new housing developments being built in Northeast, D.C. is raising concerns for members of the community, according an advisory neighborhood commissioner for Ward 6.Sondra Phillips-Gilbert is a second term commissioner for the Rosedale community that is located east of the H Street Corridor and northeast of Capitol Hill.“The fear of the community is we are being pushed out,” she told the AFRO, explaining that new construction in the community, specifically the Benning Road apartment building that will take the place of Trinidad Baptist Church, will displace several residents.  “A lot of people are going to be uprooted.”According to Phillips-Gilbert, Trinidad Baptist Church, which is across the street from Hechinger Mall, sold the building and now Valor Development is building a 10-story apartment complex in its place.The development date is scheduled for 2018 for what Valor Development has named The Valvaere. According to the company’s website, the Benning Road building will have 285 units.The major concern for current residents is whether the new development will include affordable housing that can apply with their budgets. The subsidized housing being offered is too expensive for current neighbors, according to Phillips-Gilbert, who said many low income people will be forced to move because they won’t be able to afford to live in the area anymore.She said she met with the developers at multiple ANC meetings, and asked if Valor Development would consider reducing the cost so current community members could afford to live at Valvaere.According to Felipe Serpa, a development manager from Valor Development, the company bases their rates off of the affordable housing numbers that the city council produces and regulates.Out of the projected 285 units, Serpa told the AFRO April 18 that they plan to make 20 to 23 units inclusionary zoning, which is based off of the area’s median income that is used to calculate subsidiary rents for future occupants.As of now, people making less than half of the area’s median income would have to pay $1,024 for a one bedroom unit and $1,229 for a two bedroom unit. Future occupants making around 80 percent of the area’s median income would have to pay $1,638 for a one bedroom unit and would pay $1,966 for a two bedroom, according to city guidelines.Serpa said the prices are subject to change because the company is three years out from actual developing the residence. The remaining units will be priced at market rent, he said.“The truth of the matter is development is going on all over the city,” Phillips-Gilbert said. “The areas where you find a lot of low income people are gold mines for developers.”“Money talks andpeople look up and they don’t have homes,” she said. Philips-Gilbert said a solution to the problem would be for the government to create laws that lower the affordable housing rates and ensure that businesses and developers follow the rates appropriately.“Somebody has to lookout for the little person because a lot of times no one cares about the poor,” she said.last_img read more

The Latest 2 African American Women Advance in a Runoff For Chicago

first_imgBy The Associated PressCHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the Chicago mayoral election (all times local):10:20 p.m.Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle will face former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot in a runoff to become Chicago’s next mayor.The race will guarantee the nation’s third-largest city will be led the next four years by an African-American woman.In this Dec. 9. 2018 file photo, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle speaks during a news conference at the Chicago Teachers Union headquarters in Chicago. Reform has long been a dirty word among Chicago politicians, who have well-known reputations for throwing contracts to favored businesses and dealing in patronage. But after the 2014 murder of a black teenager by a police officer and corruption charges filed against a powerful alderman, the word is now on the lips of the 14 candidates running for mayor. (Colin Boyle/Chicago Sun-Times via AP, File)Preckwinkle was the second highest vote-getter in Tuesday’s field of 14 and advances to an April 2 runoff with top vote-getter Lightfoot. Preckwinkle made a campaign issue out of black teenager Laquan McDonald’s 2014 fatal shooting by a white police officer.She is trying to succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who did not seek re-election.She previously served 19 years on the City Council and was a Chicago Public Schools teacher.___9:45 p.m.Lori Lightfoot, a former federal prosecutor in northern Illinois with no experience running for political office, has come out on top in Chicago’s crowded mayoral race and advances to a runoff.Lightfoot, who could become the first African-American woman to lead the nation’s third-largest city, was the top vote-getter in a field of 14 Tuesday. She advances to a runoff election on April 2 against the candidate with the second-highest vote.In this May 9, 2018 file photo, former Chicago Police Board President Lori Lightfoot announces her bid for mayor of Chicago at the Hyatt Regency Chicago. Reform has long been a dirty word among Chicago politicians, who have well-known reputations for throwing contracts to favored businesses and dealing in patronage. But after the 2014 murder of a black teenager by a police officer and corruption charges filed against a powerful alderman, the word is now on the lips of the 14 candidates running for mayor. (Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune via AP, File)Lightfoot was an appointee of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s to two separate policing boards before announcing plans to run against him. He later announced he wouldn’t run for re-election.Lightfoot, the first openly gay female to run for Chicago mayor, has been critical of efforts to reform the Chicago Police Department in the wake of the 2014 fatal shooting of black teenager Laquan McDonald by a white police officer.___7:10 p.m.The polls have closed in Chicago, where voters are choosing the next mayor from a field of 14 candidates promising to steer the city in a new direction.Chicago election officials say turnout for Tuesday’s election has been low despite the record number of candidates seeking to succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who decided against running for a third term.Chicago Board of Election spokesman Jim Allen says the low turnout is surprising considering the race is a hotly contested one, with polls showing at least three candidates with nearly equal support among voters.If none receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.___4:30 p.m.Chicago election officials say they are seeing an uptick in the number of people casting ballots in the city’s mayoral race after earlier expressing fears of a record low turnout.Chicago Board of Election spokesman Jim Allen says that while turnout will be low, it may surpass the 33.8 percent turnout during the 2007 election.Allen says turnout reached 26.9 percent of the city’s approximately 1.6 million registered voters by late Tuesday afternoon. He noted the turnout is surprising considering the race is a hotly contested one, with polls showing at least three candidates with near equal support among voters.Fourteen candidates are running to replace Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who isn’t seeking a third term. If none receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.___1:30 p.m.Election board officials say Chicago is headed toward possible historic low turnout for its mayoral election unless voting picks up in the final hours.Chicago Board of Election spokesman Jim Allen said Tuesday afternoon that if the current pace keeps up the city is “not even going to hit 30 percent.” He says the previous low for a February mayoral election was 33.8 percent in 2007.Fourteen candidates are running to replace Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who isn’t seeking a second term. If none receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.Allen says he thinks many voters are undecided and want to hold off “until they know who’s in the runoff, assuming there is a runoff.” He urged people to vote and said, “they don’t want to wake up tomorrow and find out their candidate barely missed making the run off.”___12:05 p.m.Campaign finance records show that the 14 candidates for Chicago mayor raised a total of $28.9 million as of Monday.The Chicago Tribune reports that the top three fundraisers in Tuesday’s election were Bill Daley, Toni Preckwinkle and Gery Chico.Daley by far had the most money with $8.3 million and $2 million of that coming from Citadel Investments CEO Ken Griffin. Preckwinkle, who is the Cook County Board president, raised $4.6 million. Her top donor was the Service Employees International Union with $2.2 million.Attorney Gery Chico came in third with $3.3 million. He was his own top donor, giving $190,000 to his campaign.The candidates are competing to replace Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who is not seeking re-election.It’s likely Tuesday’s vote will lead to a runoff. If none of the candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.___10 a.m.Chicago residents are facing a lot of choices as they head to the polls to cast ballots for the city’s next mayor.Voters are choosing from a field of 14 candidates who are all promising to steer the city in a new direction if they’re elected to succeed retiring Mayor Rahm Emanuel.The candidates include community activists, businessmen, former prosecutors and veteran politicians, including two whose fathers also held elective office.Polls opened across the city early Tuesday and will close at 7 p.m. Polling sites include a beauty salon, DePaul University’s Athletic Training Center and park district facilities.Voter Diana Sandoval tells the Chicago Tribune that she lined up before 6:45 a.m. to “make sure my voice counts, hopefully.”If none of the candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.___11:20 p.m.Voters are getting a chance to pick Chicago’s next mayor from a field of 14 candidates promising to steer the city in a new direction.Those looking to succeed retiring Mayor Rahm Emanuel include veteran politicians — a couple whose fathers also held elective office — businessmen, former prosecutors and community activists.It’s likely Tuesday’s vote will lead to a runoff. If none of the candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two vote-getters will face off April 2.The variety of candidates reflects the many issues facing Chicago’s next mayor: poor neighborhoods in need of investment, overwhelming pension debt, low-performing public schools and a crime rate that is often pointed to as among the nation’s worst.Although a nonpartisan election, most of the candidates have links to the Democratic Party. The Republican Party has virtually disappeared from the city.last_img read more

Pastor Named to 2019 Preseason AllACC Team

first_imgAbout ACC Field HockeyACC teams have won 19 of the 38 NCAA field hockey titles, including 12 of the last 17, and at least one ACC squad has advanced to the national championship game in 19 of the last 20 years. Four ACC teams earned bids to the 2018 NCAA Field Hockey Championship, marking the sixth consecutive year that the field included at least four ACC teams. • Justine Sowry enters her ninth season During that time, she has guided the Cardinals to 107 wins, four NCAA tournament appearances along with a conference title and a runner-up finish in the ACC Championship. In the eight seasons that Sowry has been at the helm, UofL has produced 12 NFHCA All-America selections and 32 All-Region team members. Defending national champion North Carolina has been selected to repeat as Atlantic Coast Conference Field Hockey champion while Duke and Virginia rounded out the top three in the preseason vote. 2019 Preseason All-ACC Field Hockey TeamFusine Govaert, Jr., M, Boston CollegeMargaux Paolino, Sr., M, DukeJillian Wolgemuth, Sr., B, DukeSammi Steele, Sr., G, DukeMercedes Pastor, Jr., M, LouisvilleYentl Leemans, Sr., M, North CarolinaErin Matson, So., F, North CarolinaClaire Webb, Sr., B, SyracuseRachel Robinson, Jr., M, VirginiaAmber Ezechiels, So., B, VirginiaAnne van Hoof, Jr., B, Wake Forest Story Links The ACC’s 2019 field hockey season officially gets underway Friday Aug. 30, with all seven league teams set to play non-conference matches.  Print Friendly Version 2019 ACC Field Hockey Predicted Order of Finish1. North Carolina (6) – 48       2. Duke (1) – 433. Virginia – 294. Louisville – 255. Syracuse – 186. Boston College – 177. Wake Forest – 16(First-place votes) UofL finished the 2018 season with a 13-6 overall record and ranked No. 14 in the National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) poll after earning the No. 3 seed in the 2018 ACC Championship. UofL will return 18 letterwinners from that team including Pastor and fellow All-West Region selections Carter Ayars, Alli Bitting and Bethany Russ. The Cards welcome six newcomers to the 2019 roster. Pastor (Buenos Aires, Argentina) earned 2018 National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) all-America honors after starting every in her first season at Louisville. The NFHCA all-West Region and all-ACC first team selection tallied five goals, including the game-winner in double overtime at No. 15 Syracuse and the deciding goal in overtime against California. Pastor also dished out three assists to bring her point total to 13 in 2018. GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – University of Louisville junior midfielder Mercedes Pastor was named to the Preseason All-ACC Field Hockey Team and the Cardinals were picked to finish four in the regular season standings in a vote of the league’s seven head coaches.last_img read more

IFLs created from piconjugated polymers improve performance and stability of optoelectronic devices

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Stabilization of the doping profile by counter-ion immobilization in self-compensated doped polymer organic semiconductors. Credit: (c) Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20133 To make optoelectronic devices a layering technique is used—a thin film conductor is caused to be in contact with a semiconductor allowing an electric charge to move between them—to facilitate the transfer an IFL is placed between them. But as Facchetti notes, conventional IFLs are considered to be inefficient—improvements would allow greater efficiency in solar cells, for example. In this new effort, the researchers suggest a particular type of polymer, part of a group called π-conjugated polymers—a type of stable polymer with high doping content that has a self-compensation mechanism that involves covalently bonded counter ions that serve to block the migration of dopants—they offer not only improved efficiency but stronger performance and more stability. But, as Facchetti also notes, most such polymers in their native state are not able to transfer large numbers of charged particles—to overcome that problem the researchers used a chemical doping process that caused the charge carriers to become denser which in turn caused the polymer to become much more conductive.To test their ideas, the researchers modified several devices (solar cells, LEDs, photodiodes, etc.), replacing conventional IFLs with ones they had created and then tested their performance. The team reports that the expected improvements in efficiency were realized, which they note, suggests such polymers have the potential to improve the efficiency of a wide variety of optoelectronic devices. More work will need to be done though before that can be proven—first it remains to be seen if such polymers can be scaled up and then it must be shown that they can stand up to the rigors of real-world demands. © 2016 Phys.org New polymer able to store energy at higher temperatures Citation: IFLs created from pi-conjugated polymers improve performance and stability of optoelectronic devices (2016, November 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-11-ifls-pi-conjugated-polymers-stability-optoelectronic.htmlcenter_img More information: Cindy G. Tang et al. Doped polymer semiconductors with ultrahigh and ultralow work functions for ohmic contacts, Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20133AbstractTo make high-performance semiconductor devices, a good ohmic contact between the electrode and the semiconductor layer is required to inject the maximum current density across the contact. Achieving ohmic contacts requires electrodes with high and low work functions to inject holes and electrons respectively, where the work function is the minimum energy required to remove an electron from the Fermi level of the electrode to the vacuum level. However, it is challenging to produce electrically conducting films with sufficiently high or low work functions, especially for solution-processed semiconductor devices. Hole-doped polymer organic semiconductors are available in a limited work-function range, but hole-doped materials with ultrahigh work functions and, especially, electron-doped materials with low to ultralow work functions are not yet available. The key challenges are stabilizing the thin films against de-doping and suppressing dopant migration. Here we report a general strategy to overcome these limitations and achieve solution-processed doped films over a wide range of work functions (3.0–5.8 electronvolts), by charge-doping of conjugated polyelectrolytes and then internal ion-exchange to give self-compensated heavily doped polymers. Mobile carriers on the polymer backbone in these materials are compensated by covalently bonded counter-ions. Although our self-compensated doped polymers superficially resemble self-doped polymers, they are generated by separate charge-carrier doping and compensation steps, which enables the use of strong dopants to access extreme work functions. We demonstrate solution-processed ohmic contacts for high-performance organic light-emitting diodes, solar cells, photodiodes and transistors, including ohmic injection of both carrier types into polyfluorene—the benchmark wide-bandgap blue-light-emitting polymer organic semiconductor. We also show that metal electrodes can be transformed into highly efficient hole- and electron-injection contacts via the self-assembly of these doped polyelectrolytes. This consequently allows ambipolar field-effect transistors to be transformed into high-performance p- and n-channel transistors. Our strategy provides a method for producing ohmic contacts not only for organic semiconductors, but potentially for other advanced semiconductors as well, including perovskites, quantum dots, nanotubes and two-dimensional materials. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Singapore and the U.K. has found that using a particular type of polymer allowed for creating interfacial layers (IFLs) in optoelectronic devices with improved performance and stability. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their technique and their results when they made actual devices using the polymer. Antonio Facchetti with Northwestern University offers a News & Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue and outlines some of the benefits of self-compensated polymers as well as some of the hurdles that will need to be overcome before they can be used in commercial products. Explore further Journal information: Naturelast_img read more