State Police To Hold Sobriety Checkpoint In Middlesex County On May 24

first_imgBOSTON, MA — The Massachusetts State Police will be holding a Sobriety Checkpoint in Middlesex County on Friday, May 24, 2019 into Saturday, May 25, 2019.Wilmington is one of the 54 cities and towns in Middlesex County.The purpose of the Sobriety Checkpoint is to detect and remove drivers who are operating under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs from the roads. The Checkpoint also raises the public’s awareness of law enforcement’s efforts to combat this serious issue.“Any inconvenience to motorists will be minimized with advanced notice to reduce fear and anxiety,” said Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police, in the announcement. “The selection of vehicles will not be arbitrary. Safety will be assured.”The Sobriety Checkpoint is funded through a grant provided by the Highway Safety Division of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedState Police To Hold Sobriety Checkpoint In Middlesex County This WeekendIn “Police Log”State Police To Hold Sobriety Checkpoint In Middlesex County On April 12 & 13In “Police Log”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, May 25, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

ONGC RIL to gain as gas prices set for a steep hike

first_imgA technician is pictured inside a desalter plant of Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC) on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India, September 30, 2016.Reuters fileCompanies such as Oil & Natural Gas Corp and Reliance Industries will be the biggest beneficiaries, if the government raises domestic natural gas prices next week.Indian government may raise domestic natural gas prices to its highest level in two years, PTI reported on Thursday citing sources close to the development.Price paid to most of natural gas produced from domestic fields is likely to be hiked to $3.06 per million British thermal unit (mmbtu) from April 1, from current $2.89, the report said.The move, if implemented, will translate into higher compressed natural gas (CNG) price and increase cost of electricity and urea production.For every one dollar rise in natural gas price, state-run ONGC’s annual net revenue increases by Rs 4,000 crore and net profit by Rs 2,300 crore.The impact on oil-to-telecom conglomerate Reliance Industries’ profitability is not likely to be as significant given the company’s low gas production of about 4.9 million metric standard cubic meters per day.While the increase in gas price will boost earnings of producers, it will also lead to a rise in CNG price and natural gas piped to households.As per the new gas pricing formula, gas prices are to be revised every six months based on average rates in gas-surplus nations like the U.S., Russia and Canada.Gas price was last hiked to $2.89 per mmbtu for October 2017 to March 2018 period from $2.48 earlier, which was the first hike in nearly three years.last_img read more

Study Shows Time Traveling May Not Increase Computational Power

first_img How Time-Traveling Could Affect Quantum Computing Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — For more than 50 years, physicists have been intrigued by the concept of closed time-like curves (CTCs). Because a CTC returns to its starting point, it raises the possibility of traveling backward in time. More recently, physicists have theorized that CTC-assisted computers could enable ideal quantum state discrimination, and even make classical computers (with CTCs) equally as powerful as quantum computers. However, a new study argues that CTCs, if they exist, might actually provide much less computational benefit than previously thought. Citation: Study Shows Time Traveling May Not Increase Computational Power (2009, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-power.html As the scientists note, one of the motivating factors for their investigation is the previous finding that CTCs can distinguish between two nonorthogonal pure states, which is impossible in standard quantum mechanics. Further, the previous results seemed to imply that CTCs could be used to distinguish between two identical states, which should be impossible no matter how you look at it. To investigate this problem, the scientists considered what would happen if they prepared and evolved quantum states according to a specific physical process. They found that two output states can be distinguished even without using a CTC, eliminating any advantage the CTC may have offered. In addition to quantum state discrimination, the physicists also investigated the alleged computational power of CTCs, where they found that the output is often not correlated with the input. The scientists argue that the root of the problem seems to lie in the definition of the CTC-assisted computational class, which is not physically or computationally meaningful, and does not produce correctly correlated mixtures of input-output pairs. The scientists proposed an alternate CTC-assisted computational class that allows them to correctly evaluate the system’s abilities, but it also shows that CTC-assisted systems do not seem to increase computational power.Not all scientists agree with the new results. Scott Aaronson of MIT, who has also investigated the possible computation benefits of CTCs, said that he has been aware of the issues of nonlinearity, but does not consider it as important as the scientists do in the current study. Further, he explains that, even in the new model, CTCs would still increase the power of quantum computers.“The underlying reason for the disagreement is this: in the actual universe, CTCs almost certainly don’t exist,” Aaronson said. “So, in asking what the right model of computation ‘would be’ if they did exist, one is inherently asking a strange and somewhat ill-defined question.”Aaronson agreed with the new study that requiring the input to be a pure state (as he and coauthor John Watrous do in a previous study) is a problem. But, he said, the new model requires the input to be nothing, which is an even bigger problem.“As it turns out, every answer to the question that people have come up with has had conceptual problems,” he said. “But in (essentially) prohibiting any input whatsoever to the CTC register, it seems to me that Bennett et al. make the conceptual problems worse, not better, than they are in my and Watrous’s model. This is a matter of honest disagreement.”In spite of the new study’s conclusions, Smith also thinks that CTCs are still worth investigating, as they may be useful in ways that are currently unknown.“I think it’s still interesting,” he said. “Our work just highlights some of the subtleties involved that can lead you to inaccurate conclusions. I should point out that we haven’t proven CTCs are no good for computation, we’ve only shown that the existing algorithms that have been proposed don’t work. So, there might be something more out there (though I wouldn’t bet on it).”More information: Charles H. Bennett, Debbie Leung, Graeme Smith, and John A. Smolin. “Can closed timelike curves or nonlinear quantum mechanics improve quantum state discrimination or help solve hard problems?” Physical Review Letters. To be published. arXiv:0908.3023v1 Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. A team of scientists consisting of Charles Bennett, Graeme Smith, and John Smolin from IBM, along with Debbie Leung from the University of Waterloo, argues that previous analyses of CTCs have fallen into the so-called “linearity trap,” and have been based on physically irrelevant definitions that have led to incorrect conclusions about CTCs. The new study will be published in an upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters.As the physicists explain, CTCs are difficult to think about because they make quantum evolution nonlinear, whereas standard quantum mechanics systems evolve linearly. (In linear systems, the evolution of a mixture of states is equal to the mixture of the evolutions of individual states; this is not the case in nonlinear systems.) It seems that much of the apparent power of CTCs has come from analyzing the evolution of pure quantum states, and extending these results linearly to find the evolution of mixed states. The physicists call this situation the “linearity trap,” which occurs when nonlinear theories are extended linearly. In the case of CTC computations, Bennett and coauthors found that this problem was causing the output to be uncorrelated with the input, which isn’t a very useful computation.“The trouble with the earlier work is that it didn’t take into account the physical processes by which the inputs to a computation are selected,” Smith told PhysOrg.com. “In a nonlinear theory, the output of a computation depends not only on the input, but also on how it was selected. This is the strange thing about nonlinear theories, and easy to miss.” To overcome these problems, the scientists proposed that the inputs to the system should be selected by an independent referee at the start of the computation, rather than being built deterministically into the structure of the computer. In order to ensure that the proper input is selected, the physicists proposed the “Principle of Universal Inclusion.” The principle states that the evolution of a nonlinearly evolving system may depend on parts of the universe with which it does not interact, ensuring that scientists do not ignore the parts of the universe that need to be used to select the inputs. The physicists hope that these criteria will lead to choosing the correct input, and then to generating the correct corresponding output, rather than simply evolving the system linearly based on incorrect inputs. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Sand Sunscreen And Sharks Cape Cod Beach

first_imgSand, Sunscreen And … Sharks! Cape Cod Beach Towns Do… Sarah Mizes-Tan by NPR News Sarah Mizes-Tan 8.28.19 3:09pm A year after a young man was killed by a shark off Cape Cod — the first such death there in more than 80 years — beach towns full of vacationers are struggling to manage an influx of great whites. Sharks off the coast have become more common in recent years as the seal population they hunt has increased. Scientists point out that sharks do not target humans, though they can mistake them for prey. But many officials believed the attack was only a matter of time.Last year’s death happened while a 26-year-old was boogie boarding. Weeks before that, another man was attacked and fought off a shark while swimming in what he said was 8 to 10 feet of water. Both those incidents have driven home the risk for many. On Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Mass., vacationer Olivia Gattuso says she normally enjoys hourlong swims. She is being more cautious now.”I mean yesterday was a really good swimming day, and I wouldn’t let myself go anywhere above my waist because I was too afraid, she says.In recent months, Outer Cape towns have been making changes to protect beachgoers from sharks. With grant money from the state, many have purchased taller lifeguard chairs to help lifeguards see farther offshore and spot sharks or seals. Beach entrances have updated shark warning signs, which note that sharks hunt seals in shallow water. Some beaches have landline emergency phones and first-aid kits. At Newcomb Hollow Beach, there’s also a new high-tech buoy in the water that alerts lifeguards when it detects a tagged shark in the area. “We actually are just coming off of a closing right now,” says head lifeguard Joey Craven. “We had to close for an hour because the buoy pinged at 10:15.”The buoy sends an alert and a description of the tagged shark to lifeguards, who then call everyone out of the water. This year, these calls have happened a lot, sometimes twice a day. This time, Craven says, “it was a shark named Ben, and he’s about 13.9 feet long. That’s a pretty mature shark.” The buoy was set up by Massachusetts shark researcher Greg Skomal, who began tagging white sharks off Cape Cod four years ago. He says the sharks his organization has logged are just a small slice of the population that exists in these waters. “We know at least 300 individuals are visiting Cape Cod, but we’ll definitely be able to tell you that’s not the actual estimate — it’s going to be much more than that,” he says. Skomal is also working on a study about shark behavior to help advise towns how to best prevent another attack. He is trying to determine whether specific areas around the cape are used for hunting or breeding or something else entirely.”We talk a lot about seeing more and more white sharks from year to year to year,” he says. “Now we’ll be able to tell you, is it increasing?” His study is due out this fall. On Nauset Beach in the town of Orleans, a mobile EMT team patrols the beach front in all-terrain vehicles, part of the town’s initiative to increase emergency response times on the beach in case of another shark attack. After last year’s fatal attack on Arthur Medici, some felt he might have survived if emergency response times had been faster. “We work with lifeguards. We patrol around looking for stuff, make sure everyone’s doing good,” says EMT Henry Rex. Every ATV is equipped with a large plastic box full of first-aid equipment, including new items specifically for treating shark bites. “We have a lot more trauma dressings and hemostatic dressings,” Rex says. Critics worry these measures are reactive, and they want towns to do more to prevent attacks. In Chatham, local official Shareen Davis says there have been “calls for putting shark barriers up, and pingers” that could detect not just tagged sharks but any shark movement in the water. “That would be great,” she says, “but those are costly, and I don’t know if the technology is even there yet.”In lieu of proven prevention tools, town officials believe their most effective approach is education, to make people aware of this new risk.Copyright 2019 WCAI. To see more, visit WCAI.last_img read more