Agencies Announce Partial Opening Of Recreation Areas and River

first_imgThe U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is opening the following areas to limited use: Jim’s Landing for day use of the boat launch, the overflow parking lot north of the Sterling Highway at the Visitor Contact Station, and Lower Skilak Boat Launch for boat launch access. The Kenai River remains closed beyond Jim’s Landing to Skilak Lake for public safety and in support of firefighting efforts. All boats must exit the river at Jim’s Landing. On the west side of SkilakWildlife Recreation Area, Lower Skilak campground and day use facility remains closed to public use. Skilak Lake Road from the west entrance at mp 75.2 of Sterling Highway will be opened to allow access to the Lower Skilak boat launch but all lands off the road, trailheads including Marsh Lake and Day Use facilities including Bottenintnin Lake remain closed. More information, detailed maps, and public safety information can be found online atkpboem.com or by visiting the official website for Chugach National Forest(https://www.fs.usda.gov/chugach/) and Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (kenai.fws.gov). For statewide fire information, visit the AICC website at https://fire.ak.blm.gov/ or http://www.akfireinfo.com. The previous daytime limitation on this river use has also been removed, allowing for 24 hour publicuse. Additionally all refuge lands that have been burned are closed to public access. Consult the attached closure order for more details.center_img The U.S. Forest Service Chugach National Forest is opening the Russian River Campground, Russian Lake Trail, Russian River Falls, Barber Cabin, and the K’Beq Day Use Area for public use. This opening will occur at the same time as the Kenai River reopening. Although this area has not been directly affected by fire, stay aware of the firefighting personnel and equipment still active on roads and lands nearby. Visit the Chugach National Forest website https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/chugach/home fordetails. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Agencies open areas to the public for recreation access effective at 12:01am on Tuesday.  This reopening of some portions of the Kenai River, Chugach National Forest and Kenai National Wildlife Refuge includes some areas that were burned by the Swan Lake Fire. Hazards exist in these burned areas that can be hard to see.Alaska Department of Natural Resources Division of State Parks announces the reopening of a portion of the Upper Kenai River previously closed to support firefighting operations. The Kenai River between the state boat launch at the Cooper Landing bridge and Jim’s Landing will reopen to public use with the exception of the continued closure of a channel on the south side of the river from approximately River Mile 69.5 to River Mile 71.5 will also be closed to support firefighting activity.last_img read more

Wilmingtons iPods For Wounded Veterans Travel To Arizona Partner With Teamsters To

first_imgTUCSON, AZ — A vacation to Arizona turned into an event honoring U.S. veterans at a facility in Tucson on Saturday where attendees received headphones and other gifts as a thank you for their service to this country.Paul Cardello, chairman and CEO for iPods for Wounded Veterans, was out in Arizona visiting family when he realized the Veterans Administration (VA) had a hospital nearby. Enlisting the help of Local 104 and the VA as well as assistance of sponsors Bose, Best Buy, Big Lots and Hudson RPM, he organized an event for upwards of 150 vets that featured speakers, giveaways, food, drink and music.A retired member of Local 170 in Worchester, Mass., Cardello and his organization have repeatedly joined with Teamsters on the local and national level in order to give back to this nation’s wounded heroes. Officials from the Teamsters Military Assistance Program were on hand to advise former military members about career opportunities with the union.“This was a massive event,” Cardello said. “Everyone was involved in it.”Vets received earbuds from Bose and magazines from Hudson. Best Buy and Big Lots provided iPods for Wounded Veterans with discounted merchandise that was raffled off at the event. The VA supplied refreshments and staffing support. Local 104 also provided volunteers for the event.The organization holds similar event around the country. The next one is scheduled for April 13 in Manchester, N.H., and Local 633 is assisting. More information about iPods for Wounded Veterans can be found HERE.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Teamsters.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTO OF THE DAY: Rep. Miceli & iPods for Wounded Vets Founder Meet At State HouseIn “Photo of the Day”PHOTO OF THE DAY: iPods for Wounded Veterans Named ‘Volunteer Service Organization of the Year’In “Photo of the Day”Benton Posthumously Honored For Making Local Letter Writing Campaign To Injured Soldiers Go NationalIn “Education”last_img read more

Former Trump Campaign Aide Nunberg Questioned By Grand Jury

first_img Share (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)Former Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg, left, arrives at the U.S. District Courthouse to appear before a grand jury, Friday, March 9, 2018 in Washington. Nunberg had insisted in a series of defiant interviews earlier in the week that he intended to defy a subpoena issued by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office, which is investigating potential coordination between Russia and the Trump campaign. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)A former Trump campaign aide appeared for hours before a grand jury Friday, after he defiantly insisted in a series of news interviews just days earlier that he intended to defy a subpoena in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.Sam Nunberg did not respond to reporters’ questions as he entered the federal courthouse with a lawyer shortly after 9 a.m. He remained behind closed doors into mid-afternoon.In extraordinary public statements about a secretive federal investigation, Nunberg on Monday had balked at complying with a subpoena that sought his appearance before the grand jury as well as correspondence with multiple other campaign officials. In doing so, he became the first witness in the Mueller probe to openly threaten to defy a subpoena.But later that night, Nunberg, who initially suggested that he considered Mueller’s document demands unreasonable, told The Associated Press that he had relented and predicted that he’d wind up complying after all.“I’m going to end up cooperating with them,” he said.Nunberg said he worked for hours to produce the thousands of emails and other communications requested by Mueller, who is investigating whether the Trump campaign improperly coordinated with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.“I thought it was a teachable moment,” he said of his 24 hours in the limelight.So far, 19 people and three companies have been charged in Mueller’s investigation. Among them are President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman and the former White House national security adviser. Five people have pleaded guilty.last_img read more

Witnesses Display Injustices to Councilmembers Regarding the Police

first_imgHoward University Business School in Northwest D.C. was where complaints were presented to District council members Oct. 8. In the school’s auditorium, many citizens vented their views regarding negative incidents with police while others listened to their stories.Council member Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6).Council member Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6), chair of the Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety, organized the public oversight hearing to hear complaints entitled “The Metropolitan Police Department: Stop and Contact Policies and Procedures.”“Before the Council broke for recess, I committed to an oversight hearing to review Metropolitan Police Department practices, specifically the methods law enforcement uses to stop and detain people in D.C.,”Wells said in a statement. “All residents should be able to expect and trust that law enforcement will protect and treat us all equally, safely, and fairly.”Hearing topics included stop and frisk, jump outs, traffic stops, and use of SWAT-like teams.Councilmembers Anita Bonds, David Grosso (At-Large members) and Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward5) shared the panel with Wells. The NAACP, the Urban League, the American Civil Liberties Union and District citizens, gave testimonies.Kymone Freeman, a black male, demanded council members have a legitimate citizens’ review board to oversee complaints regarding police conduct. require a significant number of police live in the communities they watch, and have any officer who shoots an unarmed person indicted, arrested, and convicted.Freeman said he was tired of “dead bodies over and over again,” then candidly shared his experiences with the police.Jamal Mohammad of We Act Radio said social media displayed what has been happening for decades. “We have different realities from the world (speaking of Black men in particular) with different consequences,” Mohammad said.The topic of the 1974 Stop and Frisk Law was raised but no indication was given as to what it was based on or if it was a District law for police.“The 1974 laws do not work today in modern society,” Bonds said.  She read data from the police department and concluded it may be different for citizens. Bonds later remarked when the hearing was over, “Some of the things my son has said to me, I was horrified.” She was open to suggestions on how to improve the relationship between citizens and the police.“We need more transparency,” McDuffie added. “People may be used to what’s going on and it becomes a way of life.” He encouraged citizens to file a complaint and gave a negative experience he encountered with police.Another hearing on the police department will convene 11:30 am. Oct. 27 at the John A. Wilson Building with Police Chief Cathy Lanier.last_img read more