Wilmingtons iPods For Wounded Veterans Travel To Arizona Partner With Teamsters To

first_imgTUCSON, AZ — A vacation to Arizona turned into an event honoring U.S. veterans at a facility in Tucson on Saturday where attendees received headphones and other gifts as a thank you for their service to this country.Paul Cardello, chairman and CEO for iPods for Wounded Veterans, was out in Arizona visiting family when he realized the Veterans Administration (VA) had a hospital nearby. Enlisting the help of Local 104 and the VA as well as assistance of sponsors Bose, Best Buy, Big Lots and Hudson RPM, he organized an event for upwards of 150 vets that featured speakers, giveaways, food, drink and music.A retired member of Local 170 in Worchester, Mass., Cardello and his organization have repeatedly joined with Teamsters on the local and national level in order to give back to this nation’s wounded heroes. Officials from the Teamsters Military Assistance Program were on hand to advise former military members about career opportunities with the union.“This was a massive event,” Cardello said. “Everyone was involved in it.”Vets received earbuds from Bose and magazines from Hudson. Best Buy and Big Lots provided iPods for Wounded Veterans with discounted merchandise that was raffled off at the event. The VA supplied refreshments and staffing support. Local 104 also provided volunteers for the event.The organization holds similar event around the country. The next one is scheduled for April 13 in Manchester, N.H., and Local 633 is assisting. More information about iPods for Wounded Veterans can be found HERE.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Teamsters.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTO OF THE DAY: Rep. Miceli & iPods for Wounded Vets Founder Meet At State HouseIn “Photo of the Day”PHOTO OF THE DAY: iPods for Wounded Veterans Named ‘Volunteer Service Organization of the Year’In “Photo of the Day”Benton Posthumously Honored For Making Local Letter Writing Campaign To Injured Soldiers Go NationalIn “Education”last_img read more

City Of Houston Cancels Fourth Of July Festivities Because Of Heavy Rain

first_img Share Photo: Gail Delaughter / Houston Public MediaThe City of Houston has cancelled the 4th of July festivities because of heavy rain.Susan Christian, director of the Mayor’s Office of Special Events, announced Wednesday the City of Houston has decided to cancel the Fourth of July festivities that were scheduled to take place at the Eleanor Tinsley park because of the heavy rain that is falling on our area.The fireworks, however, will go on starting at 9:35 p.m.During a media briefing held at City Hall, Christian said City officials are “very disappointed” in having to cancel the event, but noted that they went ahead with “the decision that needed to be made.”Christian also noted the organizers of the ‘Freedom over Texas’ event will refund the price of the tickets to the people who had purchased them.Independence Day celebrations in Missouri City and Katy were also canceled.last_img read more

Mini Gradiometer Could Map Other Planets Gravity Fields

first_img Recently, Jaap Flokstra and colleagues from the University of Twente in Enschede, the Netherlands, have designed a miniature gravity gradiometer that can map a planet’s gravity field. The device is a much smaller version of a gravity gradiometer called GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer), which is a European Space Agency satellite that is currently orbiting and measuring Earth’s gravity field. While GOCE has a mass of several hundred kilograms, the new mini gradiometer weighs just one kilogram. As the scientists explain, the mini gravity gradiometer is made of a single wafer of silicon. The design consists of two masses, each hanging on a spring a few centimeters part (compared with half a meter in GOCE). Whichever mass is slightly closer to a planet’s surface will feel a stronger pull on its spring compared to the other mass, allowing researchers to determine the gravity gradient. In the new design, the position of the masses is measured to within 1 picometer by a device whose capacitance changes as the masses move up and down. Flokstra and his colleagues hope that the new lightweight design would be more practical and cheaper to send into outer space for investigating the gravity fields of other planets in our solar system. For instance, such a device could search for the subterranean ocean suspected to exist near the South Pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The researchers calculate that the device could have a high sensitivity, with the ability to sense changes in a planet’s gravity field due to geological features of about 200 kilometers across or more. The researchers plan to build and demonstrate the device to use on Earth in the next few months.via: New Scientist© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Mini Gradiometer Could Map Other Planets’ Gravity Fields (2009, August 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-08-mini-gradiometer-planets-gravity-fields.html (PhysOrg.com) — Although it may seem like gravity is the same everywhere on the Earth, it actually varies a small amount from place to place. Factors such as mountains, ocean trenches, and interior density variations can all cause gravity differences. By measuring the gravity field of Earth or another planet, scientists can gain insight into that planet’s otherwise hidden geological features. GOCE’s ‘heart’ starts beating Explore further A mini gravity gradiometer could search for the subterranean ocean suspected to exist near the South Pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Image credit: NASA.last_img read more

Study Shows Time Traveling May Not Increase Computational Power

first_img How Time-Traveling Could Affect Quantum Computing Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — For more than 50 years, physicists have been intrigued by the concept of closed time-like curves (CTCs). Because a CTC returns to its starting point, it raises the possibility of traveling backward in time. More recently, physicists have theorized that CTC-assisted computers could enable ideal quantum state discrimination, and even make classical computers (with CTCs) equally as powerful as quantum computers. However, a new study argues that CTCs, if they exist, might actually provide much less computational benefit than previously thought. Citation: Study Shows Time Traveling May Not Increase Computational Power (2009, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-power.html As the scientists note, one of the motivating factors for their investigation is the previous finding that CTCs can distinguish between two nonorthogonal pure states, which is impossible in standard quantum mechanics. Further, the previous results seemed to imply that CTCs could be used to distinguish between two identical states, which should be impossible no matter how you look at it. To investigate this problem, the scientists considered what would happen if they prepared and evolved quantum states according to a specific physical process. They found that two output states can be distinguished even without using a CTC, eliminating any advantage the CTC may have offered. In addition to quantum state discrimination, the physicists also investigated the alleged computational power of CTCs, where they found that the output is often not correlated with the input. The scientists argue that the root of the problem seems to lie in the definition of the CTC-assisted computational class, which is not physically or computationally meaningful, and does not produce correctly correlated mixtures of input-output pairs. The scientists proposed an alternate CTC-assisted computational class that allows them to correctly evaluate the system’s abilities, but it also shows that CTC-assisted systems do not seem to increase computational power.Not all scientists agree with the new results. Scott Aaronson of MIT, who has also investigated the possible computation benefits of CTCs, said that he has been aware of the issues of nonlinearity, but does not consider it as important as the scientists do in the current study. Further, he explains that, even in the new model, CTCs would still increase the power of quantum computers.“The underlying reason for the disagreement is this: in the actual universe, CTCs almost certainly don’t exist,” Aaronson said. “So, in asking what the right model of computation ‘would be’ if they did exist, one is inherently asking a strange and somewhat ill-defined question.”Aaronson agreed with the new study that requiring the input to be a pure state (as he and coauthor John Watrous do in a previous study) is a problem. But, he said, the new model requires the input to be nothing, which is an even bigger problem.“As it turns out, every answer to the question that people have come up with has had conceptual problems,” he said. “But in (essentially) prohibiting any input whatsoever to the CTC register, it seems to me that Bennett et al. make the conceptual problems worse, not better, than they are in my and Watrous’s model. This is a matter of honest disagreement.”In spite of the new study’s conclusions, Smith also thinks that CTCs are still worth investigating, as they may be useful in ways that are currently unknown.“I think it’s still interesting,” he said. “Our work just highlights some of the subtleties involved that can lead you to inaccurate conclusions. I should point out that we haven’t proven CTCs are no good for computation, we’ve only shown that the existing algorithms that have been proposed don’t work. So, there might be something more out there (though I wouldn’t bet on it).”More information: Charles H. Bennett, Debbie Leung, Graeme Smith, and John A. Smolin. “Can closed timelike curves or nonlinear quantum mechanics improve quantum state discrimination or help solve hard problems?” Physical Review Letters. To be published. arXiv:0908.3023v1 Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. A team of scientists consisting of Charles Bennett, Graeme Smith, and John Smolin from IBM, along with Debbie Leung from the University of Waterloo, argues that previous analyses of CTCs have fallen into the so-called “linearity trap,” and have been based on physically irrelevant definitions that have led to incorrect conclusions about CTCs. The new study will be published in an upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters.As the physicists explain, CTCs are difficult to think about because they make quantum evolution nonlinear, whereas standard quantum mechanics systems evolve linearly. (In linear systems, the evolution of a mixture of states is equal to the mixture of the evolutions of individual states; this is not the case in nonlinear systems.) It seems that much of the apparent power of CTCs has come from analyzing the evolution of pure quantum states, and extending these results linearly to find the evolution of mixed states. The physicists call this situation the “linearity trap,” which occurs when nonlinear theories are extended linearly. In the case of CTC computations, Bennett and coauthors found that this problem was causing the output to be uncorrelated with the input, which isn’t a very useful computation.“The trouble with the earlier work is that it didn’t take into account the physical processes by which the inputs to a computation are selected,” Smith told PhysOrg.com. “In a nonlinear theory, the output of a computation depends not only on the input, but also on how it was selected. This is the strange thing about nonlinear theories, and easy to miss.” To overcome these problems, the scientists proposed that the inputs to the system should be selected by an independent referee at the start of the computation, rather than being built deterministically into the structure of the computer. In order to ensure that the proper input is selected, the physicists proposed the “Principle of Universal Inclusion.” The principle states that the evolution of a nonlinearly evolving system may depend on parts of the universe with which it does not interact, ensuring that scientists do not ignore the parts of the universe that need to be used to select the inputs. The physicists hope that these criteria will lead to choosing the correct input, and then to generating the correct corresponding output, rather than simply evolving the system linearly based on incorrect inputs. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more