POLICE LOG for April 9 Ongoing Dispute Between Neighbors Vandalism At Yentile Farm

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights of the Wilmington Police Log for Tuesday, April 9, 2019:During a check of Yentile Farm, police noted the card swipe unit on the concession room was ripped off the wall. (12:38am)Animal Control Officer located an injured turkey under a porch on Barbara Avenue. Turkey was transported to Tufts Veterinary Hospital. (8:53am)A Pouliot Place caller reported his neighbor posted a sign on her lawn stating that the caller harms dogs. Incident was part of an ongoing neighbor dispute. (3:12pm)Police received report of erratic operator on Route 62 “all over the road,” heading towards Burlington. Police pulled vehicle over. Operator admitted to using phone while driving. (5:41pm)A walk-in party reported extra patrols due to criminal charges against daughter’s boyfriend. (6:27pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 9: Man Peeing In The Woods?; Neighbor DisputeIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 14: Missing Teen Located; Trash Left Behind At Yentile FarmIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 31: Woburn Man Arrested For OUI; Bad Highway Crash Required MedflightIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Ravi Shastris continuation as Team Indias head coach confirmed CAC not looking

first_imgVirat Kohli and Ravi Shastri together.BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty ImagesFormer Indian cricketer Ravi Shastri is, reportedly, almost confirmed to continue as the head coach of Team India. As reported by IANS, a member of the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC), appointed to pick the coaching unit has made it clear that Shastri is the biggest contender and they are not looking for foreign coaches. The member further added that under Shastri the Indian team have performed well so he probably will be handed a new contract.”We are not too keen to bring in a foreign coach. Yes, had someone of the stature of Gary Kirsten applied, we might have given it a thought. But even then, an Indian would have always been the priority. After all, the team has also done well under an Indian head coach, so why look for a change? As things stand now, Shastri does look to be the favourite to be handed a fresh contract,” the CAC member told IANS.The Kapil Dev led committee member also mentioned that if there is a joint-winner then Kapil’s vote will become the decider but as of now it is likely to be in favour of Shastri.”See, firstly, it is a three-member panel, so a split decision is highly unlikely. But yes, if at all a situation does arise where A goes for one candidate, B for another and C for another, the vote of the chairman will come in and the decision will stand. But as of now, we don’t see something like that happening,” the member said. File photo of MS Dhoni and Ravi Shastri.ReutersOn the other hand, a senior BCCI official stated that it is necessary for Shastri to stay as India is undergoing a transition phase. He further claimed that as Kohli has a good equation with Shastri it will be better if the latter stays as the coach.”Nothing permanent with a long term effect should happen at this stage of transition. Shastri and Kohli complement each other well and it would be unfair to change half of a team that has been successful. A change in coach may disturb the equation that exists and allows the players to have the mental space to excel,” the official told IANS.”If a change is made at this stage, it would be a change of strategy and planning for the next 5 years. It would be unfair to take such a decision at a stage when the stakeholders are not the ones deciding,” the official further added.The Men in Blue are currently in the Caribbean for the West Indies tour and they are already 2-0 up in the T20 international series. The coaching unit of the Indian team has been given an extension till the end of the Windies tour.last_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Friday August 7

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uWe’ll dive into last night’s GOP debate in Cleveland with political commentators Barry Rascovar, John Bullock of Towson University and the AFRO’s Roberto Alejandro. Plus, more on 21st Century Jim Crow in Pocomoke City, MD. and the firing of that town’s first Black police chief, with our regular contributors, Alejandro and Stephen Janis and Taya Graham of The Real News Network. It’s all coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img

Human fear of spiders draws scientific focus

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Female comb-footed spider (family Theridiidae), Enoplognatha ovata. Photographed in the wild at DuPage County, Illinois, USA. Size = 15mm. Credit: Bruce Marlin/Wikipedia/CC BY 3.0 , Cognition Some dangerous spider species may have been common during our evolutionary history. A number of species with potent venoms populated Africa before hominoids and have co-existed there for tens of millions of years. A black widow spider bite in the ancestral world even if not fatal could leave one incapacitated for days or weeks.Joshua New, Department of Psychology, Barnard College and colleague Tamsin German, wrote “Spiders at the cocktail party: an ancestral threat that surmounts inattentional blindness,” which has been published in Evolution and Human Behavior. The paper stated that the human visual system may retain ancestral mechanisms uniquely dedicated to the rapid detection of immediate and specific threats, such as spiders and snakes, which persistently recurred throughout evolutionary time. The authors concluded that “Spiders may be one of a very few evolutionarily-persistent threats that are inherently specified for visual detection and uniquely ‘prepared’ to capture attention and awareness irrespective of any foreknowledge, personal importance, or task-relevance.”New and German asked their participants to look at abstract shapes and data on computer screens. Among those images were needles and flies. Results, as reported in the Daily Sun: “Of the 252 people reviewed in the study, most recognized the spiders much quicker than other images known to induce fear, such as flies and needles.” Spider images got more attention; the viewers spotted them and knew what they were. The authors reported that, “Despite their highly marginalized presentation, iconic spiders were nonetheless detected, localized, and identified by a very large proportion of observers.” Their test, said the authors, made use of the “inattentional blindness paradigm” in which an unexpected, peripheral stimulus is presented coincidentally with a central task-relevant display. Last year, Inside Science turned to the spider study which had been published online. Inside Science described how the study was designed: “To see if there is something special about spiders, the researchers showed people a cross shape that flashed in the middle of a screen for an eighth of a second. The participants’ task, as far as they knew, was to judge which of the two bars on the cross was longer. During the first three trials, only the cross appeared. On the fourth trial, another image appeared at the same time. The possible images included a spider, a hypodermic needle, a housefly, and abstract shapes made by rearranging the lines of the spider.” People were asked if they saw anything other than just the cross and, if so, in which part of the screen. They also tried to identify the image by selecting it from a lineup.New’s study reflects a question that scientists have posed before about human reactions to spiders: In 2008, the study “Do infants possess an evolved spider-detection mechanism?” appeared in Cognition. Babies looked at spiders longer than they looked at other images. Authors David Rakison and Jaime Derringer talked about “an evolved predator recognition mechanism that specifies the appearance of recurring threats.”The results, they said, supported the hypothesis that humans “may possess a cognitive mechanism for detecting specific animals that were potentially harmful throughout evolutionary history.”Rakison said in Inside Science that “At least with children, there’s very little conflicting evidence that spiders and snakes have some kind of privileged nature in human visual processing.” More information: Spiders at the cocktail party: an ancestral threat that surmounts inattentional blindness, Evolution and Human Behavior, dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2014.08.004 A fear of spiders, arachnophobia, is in our DNA. You don’t learn to freeze at the site of these creatures; you’re born with the fear. Even the sight of hypodermic needles and houseflies does not trigger a similar response. Scientists pin that fear on survival instinct. The theory goes like this: Humans evolved in Africa where being able to spot a spider was of necessity. Spiders found able to custom build webs to trap best food source Explore further Journal information: Evolution and Human Behavior © 2015 Phys.org Citation: Human fear of spiders draws scientific focus (2015, April 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-human-spiders-scientific-focus.htmllast_img read more

Memory marks and markers

first_img‘Marks are made by markers, but the marks also define the markers. This show is all about memory and history. Memories are like marks which have been created by a particular time and at the same time, eroded by time too. So “time” is the marker here, a personal/private time and Time as an eternal flow. Marks are then the signs of/for my intrinsic unconscious self and these could be read also as conscious choices from my socio-private experiences, mediated by time,’ says artist Samindranath Majumdar, talking about his work. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Paintings of this Kolkata-based artist will be on exhibition at the Gallerie Ganesha in a show called Marks And Markers. Samindranath Majumdar’s paintings look back to his own experiences, using abstraction and multiple layers of paint to redefine space and memory.His works tread the fine line between completely abstract and representative forms, calling into question the role that narrative threads play in experiencing art. For Majumdar, memory unfolds in a series of unstable visuals. Born in a Kolkata suburb, he grew up among greenery which was slowly being replaced by the growing space of a crowded metropolis. Observing the imposing and, sometime, crumbling buildings on a daily basis left its mark on his memory, to surface many years later in his canvases.last_img read more