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Irredeemable Human Martin Shkreli Forced To Give Up One-Of-A-Kind Wu-Tang Clan Album

first_imgFederal prosecutors have been trying to get their hands on convicted felon and categorically terrible person Martin Shkreli’s assets since December, a few months after he was convicted of three counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud. Now it looks they’ll be getting one of his more famous holdings: a one-a-kind of Wu-Tang Clan’s Once Upon a Time in Shaolin. The poster child for the excesses of our new Gilded Age—who rose to infamy after raising the price of a drug used by cancer and AIDS patients by 5,000% in a transparently villainous bid to make a quick buck—purchased Wu-Tang Clan’s comically rare album for $2 million in 2015. The record’s sale itself was something of a social experiment, as only a single copy of Once Upon a Time in Shaolin was ever produced (the album was recorded in secret between 2008 and 2013). Fans of Wu-Tang Clan weren’t the only folks who were upset about the fact that one of hip-hop’s rarest items ended up in the hands of an anthropomorphic ball of slime. Back in 2016, Wu-Tang’s own Ghostface Killah did an interview with TMZ video in which he called Shkreli a “shithead.”Ghostface Killah on Martin Shkreli<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>In any event, Shkreli is currently wasting away in a Brooklyn jail cell awaiting his sentence (which could be as high as 27 years), and a federal judge just ordered him to forfeit $7,360,450 in assets. One Upon a Time in Shaolin will reportedly be among them, and he may also have to fork over other valuables like a Picasso painting and a copy of Lil Wayne’s unreleased album The Carter V. I think we all agree with Indiana Jones that stuff like this “belongs in a museum” or, at the very least, an easy-to-access online music streaming service.[H/T – Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

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Reckers fire causes evacuation, no damage

first_imgAt about 10:30 a.m. Thursday, a small fire in the chimney of Reckers Cafe caused an approximately hour-long evacuation of South Dining Hall.At the scene, University spokesperson Dennis Brown said there were no injuries and no damage to the dining hall building, though there may be some damage to the restaurant’s pizza oven.“There was a fire in the chimney shaft above the Reckers restaurant,” Brown said. “There’s a pizza oven in there. The fire was contained. [There was] a lot of smoke, but no damage in the building itself.”The Notre Dame Fire Department (NDFD) also called in the South Bend and Clay fire departments for support.“They assisted with a large ladder that allowed us to get up above the shaft to find out what was going on,” Brown saidThe cause of the fire could not be determined immediately, Brown said, but the incident is under investigation. Reckers remained closed after the fire for the day, while the rest of the dining hall reopened. About 65 dining hall employees were held outside the building until shortly before 11:30 a.m., when NDFD allowed them to re-enter. Tags: fire, Notre Dame Fire Department, Reckers, South Bend Fire Department, South Dining Halllast_img read more

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Notre Dame valedictorian shares experiences, path to graduation

first_imgSenior Andrew Grose has always loved languages.This love started in his hometown of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where he trained for the national spelling bee as a middle schooler. After making it to the national stage twice, he discovered a passion within himself — studying language.“The most I got out of that [spelling bee] experience was understanding how words come together to create a meaning that goes far beyond the language itself,” Grose said. “And so you can say I’m somebody who deals in that business primarily.”And now, as the class of 2018’s valedictorian, Grose will be employing his love of language in a new way to give the Notre Dame valedictory address May 20 at the commencement ceremony.A double major in pre-professional studies and Spanish, Grose will be graduating with an overall GPA of 3.997. He was also a member of the Glynn Family Honors Program, an early inductee into the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society, a four-year member of the Dean’s List and has been the recipient of various service and pre-professional studies awards.“I try not to think of [being valedictorian] as something that has a lot of pressure associated with it,” Grose said. “I think of it not so much as my telling my story, but rather an opportunity to tell the stories of other people I’ve engaged with over the past four years. They’ve been my voice, really.”Grose said he was initially drawn to Notre Dame because it was the only school that advertised “a more social message” in terms of applying what was learned in the classroom.“Ultimately here at Notre Dame it’s not about simply learning information, it’s about how you apply that information to help the neighbor,” Grose said. “For me that’s — that can seem like a very simple statement, but it’s really not if you consider how committed to the concept of discipleship a school like Notre Dame really is.”Though he wasn’t initially able to “find the dialogue” between his majors, Grose said his professors helped him re-define his educational experience and put both of his academic disciplines under the Notre Dame vision of education and social justice.“I certainly would not have the stance that I have now on how medicine can be an agent for social change if I had not taken Spanish here,” he said. “Because that was where I really learned to apply all facets of my education, through the department of romance languages — it’s definitely I think one of the University’s best-kept secrets, if it is a secret.”Grose was also a four-year member in the Marching Band drumline and two-year member in the Liturgical Choir. Grose’s band experience, he said, was “unbelievable” and was the first activity that made him feel comfortable at Notre Dame.“[Band] made me an ambassador for the University without even knowing what the University stood for,” Grose said. “It gave me more confidence in representing a place, a culture like Notre Dame’s. … It’s really cool to just see all of us going in defined directions, much more defined than we would’ve thought when we were having conversations about our education three years ago at this point.”An enormous turning point in his college career, Grose said, was studying abroad in Toledo, Spain the summer after his sophomore year and doing a international summer service learning program in El Salvador the summer after his junior year. “Each of them was so important for me in terms of my educational and my personal formation,” he said. “I’d been studying [Spanish] since grade school, but I’d say here is where I really started to learn it and apply it.”His El Salvadoran experience was much more than language immersion, Grose said, because of its medical and Catholic Social Teaching orientation. It also contributed to the focus of Grose’s senior thesis, which was a profile of El Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton and a close-reading of his poetry.“For me, [the Notre Dame experience has] really been finding a voice with which I can speak about, discuss, debate and further exploit issues that matter to me,” he said. “And it’s not necessary that you know what issues those are before you start developing those skills, which is why I’ve really enjoyed having the mentors I’ve had here … the issues kind of fell in place for me in terms of Latin America, US-Latino experience, healthcare in general and public health.”Grose found service opportunities through his extracurriculars, as well — he was a volunteer at La Casa de Amistad, a South Bend Latino community center where he said the idea of transnationalism became visible to him. He was also a mentor in ‘Bandlink,’ a band program that provides music lessons to kids in the South Bend area. “I think it’s been incredible to grow from a very scared freshman — I didn’t even know how to march at that point — into somebody who is teaching people how to do that,” Grose said. “And how to uphold the traditions that our University represents. … I mean none of that would have been possible without the people guiding me through it all [the last] four years.”Some of the most important guidance he received, Grose said, was from the advising groups and professors in both pre-professional studies and Spanish.“All of them have given me so much to think about whenever I’ve come to them with a question on anything, really,” he said. “How to go about interpreting a poem, how to put a sociological term in context, how to make sense of what I could possibly do with my life. They’ve been such amazing multi-dimensional mentors in that sense.”Being around a group of people who have “so much energy” in the undergraduate atmosphere and are so service-minded is amongst the top things Grose said he’ll miss most about Notre Dame.“I think Notre Dame has a special kind of draw to people who are pulled by their desire to really put the information they’re learning in the context they’ve engaged in into action and ultimately for some higher purpose, whether it’s equity, justice, anything,” he said. “That’s something that so many of my friends here really deeply care about and it’s something that really defines the student identity here, that I’ll miss for sure.”This isn’t the end of Grose’s Notre Dame journey, however — he said he will be returning next fall to pursue a master’s degree in Iberian and Latin American studies.“My ultimate goal is to find some sort of role where I can balance public health, worker and physician roles and national and international roles,” he said. “If anything, though, the thing that’s been on my mind ever since I left my service-learning experience last year is finding a way to get back to Central America because that is where I met people who really moved with a purpose unlike anything I’d ever seen in any discipline I’ve explored throughout my time at Notre Dame.”Tags: 2018 Commencement, Andrew Grose, class of 2018, Commencement, valedictorianlast_img read more

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The World’s Greatest Runners

first_img center_img Arnulfo Quimare Last weekend, I had the honor of running with the world’s greatest endurance athletes: the Raramuri, an indigenous tribe living in the deepest canyons on the continent.The Raramuri (also known as the Tarahumara) scratch a living out of rocky, steep soil in the Copper Canyons of the Sierra Madre Mountains in northwestern Mexico. They are subsistence farmers who grow corn and beans and who live in caves or tiny huts scattered throughout four monstrous chasms—each deeper than the Grand Canyon.The Raramuri make their own clothes—including their sandals, which are just used tire tread wrapped to their feet with leather straps. Through deep snow and blistering heat, rocky canyon trails and thorny sagebrush, the Rarmauri travel virtually barefoot, the soles of their feet thick with calluses.The Raramuri are great runners because running is part of their everyday life. They don’t run for glory or competition—although they have entered a few races and defeated some of the world’s greatest athletes. They run to get somewhere—to visit family, to sell produce in town, to gather food, or even to hunt deer. With only primitive weapons, the Raramuri have hunted deer by literally running them to exhaustion.A few gringos have lured Raramuri to top endurance races, including the Leadville 100 Miler back in 1993 and 1994. Raramuri runners won the event both years and set a course record—wearing their hand-made tire tread sandals. But the Raramuri shy away from the glitz of American competitions. They prefer to run in their canyon homelands, often in traditional running ceremonies that involve hundreds of miles and last for days.Once a year, though, the Raramuri wander down from their caves and cliffside huts to run the Copper Canyon Ultramarathon, a 47-Mile footrace that has attracted not only the top Raramuri runners, but also the best athletes from around the world. Ultra legend and seven-time Western States 100 Mile champ Scott Jurek ran the Copper Canyon Ultra in 2006–and lost to Arnulfo Quimare, a 27-year-old goat herder wearing hand-made sandals.I ventured down to the Copper Canyons last week to join 225 other Raramuri runners and a dozen international running celebrities, including Hiroki Ishikura, Japan’s top trail runner. The day before the race, I tried on a pair of Raramuri sandals: I could barely make it 100 yards before my feet were screaming—the leather straps blistered the skin between my toes, and jagged rocks seemed to pierce the thin tire tread with every stride. After stepping inside in their shoes, my admiration for the Raramuri’s toughness was further magnified.Sharing the trail with the Raramuri was the most powerful running experience of my life. I learned a lot from observing their graceful stride and smooth running form, but I gained even more from seeing the pure joy on their normally stoic faces. The Raramuri understand something about running that has taken me a lifetime to learn: running is not a chore one endures to lose weight or look good; it is instead a joyful expression of the human spirit. For the Raramuri, running is a spiritual act that deepens their connection to the divine.Once again in 2009, Arnulfo was the first Raramuri to finish, covering the steep, rugged course with four river crossings in around seven hours. He wore a loincloth and worn-out sandals for 47 miles and ate only cornmeal mixed with water. Just a few days before the race, Arnulfo had trekked 40 miles across two canyons to get to the race (not exactly a taper), and the day after the ultra, he walked 40 miles back home to tend to his goats.The Raramuri run ultramarathons every day, and they do it with a pure spirit and a joyful heart—even as more logging roads rip apart their ancestral canyons and druglords murder their leaders. They are the ultimate endurance athletes.To learn more about the Raramuri, watch this 10-minute video I produced: Running for Their Lives. For more information about the Copper Canyon Ultramarathon, including photos and race reports, click here.last_img read more

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Colombia Offers to Assist Other Countries in Combating Drug Trafficking

first_imgBy Dialogo January 25, 2011 In an interview published on 23 January, Colombian Defense Minister Rodrigo Rivera said that Colombia has acquired experience in the fight against drug trafficking and could assist other countries in combating it, if the United States and others finance that aid. “We’re not entirely free to offer that cooperation using our own resources, and this is where there’s a place for the new role of allies like the United States and other countries that can finance the (security) aid that Colombia can offer,” Rivera declared to the Bogotá daily El Tiempo. He added that his country has “acquired many capabilities” for the fight against drugs, violence, and kidnapping within the framework of Plan Colombia – which has been sponsored by Washington since 2000 and the budget of which is being gradually reduced by decision of the White House – and that Bogotá is currently assisting Mexico and thirteen other countries, including several in Central America and the Caribbean. That aid “should serve Colombia’s interests in the fight against transnational crime and a portfolio of capabilities that we can offer at the global level,” the minister said. Rivera indicated that Bogotá “will not let down its guard” against drug traffickers, kidnappers, and violent groups, despite the decrease in direct U.S. aid to Plan Colombia, and that the Colombian police and military are already prepared to take over the programs Washington has been financing. The United States dedicated around 465 million dollars in military and financial aid to Plan Colombia in the 2010-2011 fiscal year, compared to 540 million dollars the year before, amid the budget difficulties the White House is facing due to the global crisis. Washington also wants to focus its aid to the Andean country on social programs and strengthening human rights, the judicial system, and other institutions, and not so much on the military apparatus, as was the case in the previous decade. As part of Plan Colombia, approved by former Democratic president Bill Clinton, the United States has given the South American country more than six billion dollars since 2000.last_img read more

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Sell your ideas to the CEO: 5 steps

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » In his work as a strategic planning professional, Jeff Rendel has built relationships with nearly 500 credit union CEOs, and he has surveyed these executives about how they prefer learning about ideas for new initiatives.Rendel offers five suggestions on selling ideas to the CEO:1. Bring new ideas. This sounds obvious, but CEOs are looking for fresh ideas rather than the “same old, same old” in an industry that is built on tradition but threatened by disruption.That means knowing what’s on the horizon and what’s working elsewhere. Don’t shy away from imitation, or being a fast follower.“The true value of innovation comes from imitation,” Rendel says.last_img read more

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Polling Problems – The New York Times

first_imgFool us once …The polls were wrong again, and much of America wants to know why.- Advertisement – 4. Most of the easy solutions are probably not real solutions. Since Election Day, some campaign operatives have claimed their private polls were more accurate than the public polls. That seems more false than true. Biden, Trump and both parties campaigned as if their own polls matched the public polls, focusing on some states that were not really competitive and abandoning others that were close.- Advertisement – 5. Polls have still been more accurate over the last four years than they were for most of the 20th century. As pollsters get more information about this year’s election and what went wrong, they will try to fix the problems, much as they did in the past. A new challenge: In the smartphone age, poll response rates are far lower than they used to be.6. We journalists can do a better job of conveying the uncertainty in polls. Polls will never be perfect. Capturing the opinions of a large, diverse country is too difficult. And in today’s closely divided U.S., small polling errors can make underdogs look like favorites and vice versa. All of us — journalists, campaign strategists and the many Americans who have become obsessed with politics — shouldn’t forget this. We just got another reminder. Dozens of pre-election polls suggested that Joe Biden would beat President Trump by a wide margin, but the race instead came down to one or two percentage points in a handful of states. Polls also indicated that Democrats would do much better than they did in congressional races.So what happened? Here are six key points:1. In the last few years, Republican voters seem to have become less willing to respond to polls. Maybe that shouldn’t be surprising, given Trump’s attacks on the media, science and other institutions.- Advertisement – And my colleague Nate Cohn, who knows more about this subject than almost anybody, points out that a significant chunk of the error involved Hispanic voters. Nate has also discussed polling on episodes of “The Daily” and “The Argument” podcasts.Elsewhere: Sarah Isgur of The Dispatch says the problem isn’t about Trump voters who lie about their preference. Charles Franklin of Marquette University suggests the pandemic may have affected turnout in surprising ways. Kristen Soltis Anderson, a Republican pollster, notes that polls in many states will still be “incredibly close” to the final result.THE LATEST NEWSThe ElectionThe Virus Broadway is closed. It’s also everywhere.These are difficult times for live theater. The pandemic has shut down Broadway and many local theaters since March, leaving actors, stagehands and others out of work and fans missing the shows. But there is one way that theater is managing to thrive right now: Broadway has become a bigger source of televised entertainment.An incomplete list of recent and upcoming releases includes “The Prom,” “The Boys in the Band,” “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” “West Side Story” and “Wicked.” The film version of “Hamilton” was so popular that it contributed to a bump in sign-ups for Disney Plus, The Verge reports. And in a Broadway first, a musical focused on the life of Diana, Princess of Wales is set to debut on Netflix before the stage production opens.Why is this happening now? One reason is streaming services’ “insatiable desire for content, even niche content,” Alexis Soloski writes in The Times. There’s also more mingling across theater, film and television than in the past. The playwright Jeremy O. Harris, who wrote “Slave Play,” signed a deal with HBO this year; Phoebe Waller-Bridge, who originally wrote and performed “Fleabag” as a one-woman play, signed one with Amazon.Some critics worry that film versions will cannibalize live ticket sales. But no film can entirely reproduce the experience of a live show. Just look at social media’s horrified reaction to last year’s movie version of “Cats.”The Times recommends: “What the Constitution Means to Me,” Heidi Schreck’s affecting play about the document’s impact on our daily lives.PLAY, WATCH, EATWhat to Cookcenter_img Morning ReadsModern Love: A man finds himself caught up in a global romance scam.The planet’s future: Climate change will be central to Biden’s presidency. Here’s what he plans to do about it.Lives Lived: Lucille Bridges braved abuse from white protesters as she and her 6-year-old daughter, Ruby, walked to an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, crossing one of the segregated South’s most rigidly defended color lines. Bridges died at 86.Subscribers make our reporting possible, so we can help you make sense of the moment. If you’re not a subscriber, please consider becoming one today. Want to get The Morning by email? Here’s the sign-up.Good morning. It’s another record day for virus cases. Obama’s memoir gets a glowing review. And we look at why the polls were wrong. 2. This phenomenon isn’t simply about working-class whites. Pollsters were careful to include more of these voters in their samples than four years ago, when the polls also missed, but it didn’t solve the problem. One likely reason: Even within demographic groups — say, independent, older, middle-income white women — people who responded to polls this year leaned more Democratic than people who did not.3. It’s also not just about Trump. Polls missed in several Senate races even more than in the presidential race, which means they did an especially poor job of finding people who voted for Biden at the top and a Republican lower down the ballot. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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MRT, LRT and Transjakarta limit passenger numbers, but resume normal operating hours

first_imgTopics : “We’ll manage our fleet so headway is shorter. MRT cars will arrive every five minutes during rush hour,” he said.Anies urges passengers to maintain distance while waiting for public transportation.”Every passenger should actively practice social distancing. We’ve seen examples in countries where people did not seriously implement social distancing and the virus spread very rapidly. It’s not only about obeying rules, it’s about protecting oneself, protecting others and protecting the public,” he said.Prior to the announcement, the Transportation Ministry’s land transportation director general, Budi Setiyadi, had asked the Jakarta administration to review the policy of restricting public transportation operational hours, saying that it was counterproductive to curb the spread of coronavirus.”I hope the Jakarta administration and the Jakarta Transportation Agency reevaluates the policy. As it has caused long lines and crowding in Transjakarta bus stops. It is counterproductive to the initial goal of preventing the spread of coronavirus in public transportation,” said Budi in a statementHe also said the ministry had urged all public transportation operators in the country to take preventive measures in curbing COVID-19 infections.”We urge [all operators] to tighten their health checkups, provide hand sanitizer, ask passengers to wear masks, reduce vehicle capacity and clean tap-on gates, vehicles’ seats, windows, doors, and handles with disinfectant,” he said. The Jakarta Transportation Agency announced Monday that the city’s public transportation, such as Transjakarta buses, MRT and LRT, would resume normal operations on Tuesday after a policy to restrict their operational hours in a bid to contain the spread of COVID-19 backfired, causing long lines at stations and bus stops.”We’ll resume normal operating hours but we’ll limit passenger numbers in each mode of transportation,” agency head Syafrin Liputo said on Monday.He said passenger capacity for the MRT would be limited to 360 passengers from 1,200 per trip, while LRT capacity would be limited to 80 people from 270.center_img “For Transjakarta, the passenger limit is 60, previously 150, in articulated buses and 30 passengers in normal buses, previously 80 passengers,” Syafrin said.He also explained that Transjakarta had modified its routes to focus on corridors with high demand.”With the new passenger limit, we will need to increase [bus] supply by 200 percent in corridors with high demand. It means [we’ll reduce service] in corridors with very low load factor,” he said.Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan said resuming normal operations while limiting passengers was necessary to prevent crowding in stations, bus stops and on board public transportation.last_img read more

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China March exports slump slows to 6.6% y/y, imports down 0.9%

first_imgTopics : China’s exports fell 6.6 percent in March from a year earlier, while imports shrank 0.9 percent, a better than expected outcome as factories restarted production, though the global coronavirus health crisis looks set to keep trade under pressure over coming months.Customs data released on Tuesday compared with analysts’ forecasts in a Reuters poll for a 14 percent slump in exports. Shipments had dived 17.2 percent in January-February.Analysts had forecast a 9.5 percent contraction in imports, worsening from a slide of 4 percent in the first two months of the year. China posted a trade surplus of $19.9 billion last month, compared with the poll’s forecast for an $18.55 billion surplus, and a reversal of January-February’s deficit of $7.096 billion.last_img

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Stockland’s house and land packages are more affordable than the average established Greater Brisbane home

first_imgZane Cassim has purchased a 400sq m block at Pallara.New homes in some southeast Queensland suburbs are now more affordable than the average established home in surrounding areas.Latest figures from REIQ revealed Greater Brisbane’s median house price rose almost 2.6 per cent in the three months to December 2016, taking the median house price to $513,000.Stockland communities at Pallara, North Lakes, Stone Ridge at Narangba, Sovereign Pocket at Deebing Heights, and Vale at Holmview are all offering new home alternatives for thousands of dollars less than that figure.Home and land packages at Stockland communities start at $308,466 for a three-bedroom home at Sovereign Pocket at Deebing Heights, which is $204,534 below Greater Brisbane’s latest median house price.Even within the Brisbane local government area, house and land packages at Stockland’s Pallara community, 19km from the CBD, are priced at $454,870 which is $200,130 below Brisbane LGA’s median house price of $655,000.Zane Cassim has purchased a 400sq metre block at Pallara and is looking forward to building his new four-bedroom family home in July.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours ago“Affordability was definitely a key reason why I have chosen to build a new home at Pallara,” Mr Cassim said.“Property close to Brisbane city is usually $600,000 plus, so I’ve saved hundreds of thousands of dollars.“Pallara is in a fantastic location within close proximity of everything the city has to offer.”Stockland Queensland general manager Kingsley Andrew said the chance to secure a $20,000 Queensland First Home Owner’s Grant made it the perfect time for first home buyers to build a new home.“There is often a false economy in buying an older established home with a view to renovating it to suit the demands and lifestyle needs of modern living,” Mr Andrew said.“It is well documented that the cost per square metre of renovations usually far exceed the cost per square metre of building a brand new home.”Mr Andrew said by buying a new home, customers could choose exactly what they want in their new home.last_img read more