Fifth Harmony Star Designs Tee For Save The Children

first_imgFifth Harmony’s Camila Cabello has teamed up with Save the Children to design a limited-edition T-shirt to shine a light on girls around the world.Fifth Harmony’s Camila Cabello has teamed up with Save the Children to design a limited-edition T-shirtThe special Love Only collaboration, which launches ahead of International Day of the Girl, is available starting today through Oct. 18, with 100 percent of the net proceeds going to Save the Children. The Love Only collaboration will be available at represent.com/camila.On Oct. 11, Save the Children will celebrate International Day of the Girl, a day dedicated to highlighting the barriers girls face globally and to empowering girls to reach their full potential. The Love Only tee will help support the charity’s efforts to raise awareness of these issues and to ensure a world where girls get equal access to education, health care and opportunities to succeed. The Love Only collaboration for Save the Children is Camila Cabello’s first-ever charity tee.“Love Only is an important concept to me – it’s all about uplifting ourselves and supporting others,” Camila Cabello, a Save the Children Celebrity Cabinet member, said. “I am so inspired by what Save the Children is doing to give girls around the world a brighter future. So I wanted to support this amazing cause by designing this special Love Only tee and hoodie.”The limited-edition T-shirt is selling for $24.99. A hoodie sweatshirt is also offered for $39.99. Both styles are available for purchase worldwide.Camila Cabello and Save the Children invite supporters and influencers to get involved, take a photo in the T-shirt and spread the campaign on social media using #LoveOnlyTee.last_img read more

More poles arrive on island FortisTCI continuing to push ahead

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp T&T companies tap into Cuban market at Expo Caribe 2019 Editorial: Listen to your Mama Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, October 3, 2017 – Providenciales – More power poles over the weekend arrived in country to support the massive job of restoring the electricity of nearly the entire country still, nearly a month after Hurricane Irma which did the real damage to the #FortisTCI power supply system.   Worst hit are known:  Five Cays, Chalk Sound, Blue Hills and Grand Turk.FortisTCI is updating the government on a daily basis when it comes to electricity restoration progress and up to September 27th there were nearly 5,000 customers restored; 44% in Providenciales, 75% in North and Middle Caicos; 15% in South Caicos and Grand Turk had 51 customers with their power back on.The job in the Capital is extensive as 36 miles of electricity wire needs to be run and on Salt Cay, there is yet to be an assessment.   #MagneticMedia has been hounding leaders for a timeline for restoration of electricity, the Premier explains that FortisTCI is working on one and that information will come this week, according to Mrs. Robinson.As it relates to what Hurricanes Irma and Maria have cost the country, the tally is still unknown.  Premier Sharlene Robinson said the United Nations through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office will help the Turks and Caicos determine what the economic impact is of the killer storms which pounded the Turks and Caicos Islands in September. #Metoo-movement-type complaint, now investigation of high-ranking TCI Police Officer opened Recommended for you Related Items:FORTIStci, magneticmedialast_img read more

Trumps Indonesian business partner summoned

first_imgDonald TrumpUS President Donald Trump’s Indonesian business partner has been questioned by police over alleged threats against a public prosecutor, officials said Friday.Hary Tanoesoedibjo, a media and property mogul who is building two Trump Organization hotel projects, was summoned as a suspect Friday after an investigation was issued against him in June, a police spokesman said.The 51-year-old business tycoon and politician is being named a suspect after police charged him with violating the electronic information and transaction law.”Today is actually the second time we have summoned Hary Tanoesoedibjo. We have summoned him before but at that time his lawyer said he couldn’t show up,” national police spokesman Setyo Wasisto said.The billionaire was reported to police by an attorney named Yulianto, who like many Indonesians goes by one name.Yulianto claimed Tanoesoedibyo had threatened him via text messages in January 2016.The attorney was handling a graft case which involved Mobile-8 Telecom, a telecommunication company owned by Tanoesoedibyo.Tanoesoedibyo’s lawyer, Hotman Paris Hutapea, denied the messages were threats.”As humans we know what would be considered as threats and what not. What he said is something all politicians do,” Hutapea told AFP.Tanoesoedibyo’s company is in the process of building two luxury resorts in Indonesia which would be managed by Trump Hotels.The resorts are planned to be built on the popular tourist island of Bali and in Lido, West Java, just a couple of hours away from capital Jakarta. Construction on the hotels has not yet begun.Tanoesoedibyo attended the US president’s inauguration in January, and described Trump’s win as inspiring.Tanoesoedibyo is now banned from travelling abroad for the next six months, a spokesman of the immigration office told AFP, and if found guilty could be jailed for four years maximum.The billionaire ran in Indonesia’s 2014 election as candidate for vice president but failed to make it to the final round with his running mate.He later founded his own political party with many speculating he might run in the 2019 presidential election.last_img read more

Poll Most Say Sex Misconduct Victims Are Underprotected

first_img Share Photo via Wikimedia CommonsMost Americans say sexual misconduct is a major problem and that too little is being done to protect victims, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But some — particularly Republican men — are concerned about the rights of the accused.The sheer speed with which an accusation of sexual misconduct can sink a career rattles some men, and not just Republicans. Bart Cassida, a 40-year-old Democrat from Indiana, said he tends to believe the accusers. But he’s concerned about employers “immediately dismissing people without proper investigation.”“People think that men don’t mind being that kind of guy,” someone physically assertive with women, said Dan Lee, 65, a Palm Springs, California, Democrat who retired after a four-decade career in computer science. “I think that’s wrong … men are concerned with their reputations.”The poll shows that nearly 6 in 10 Americans think there is too little protection for the rights of people who have been victims of workplace sexual misconduct. By contrast, just 37 percent think there’s too little protection for people accused of sexual misconduct, 35 percent think there’s the right amount and 26 percent think there’s too much.Majorities of women of all political persuasions, as well as male Democrats and independents, think too little is done to protect victims, but only about a third of male Republicans think the same. Among Republican men, by contrast, 52 percent think there are too few protections for the accused. Just 33 percent of Democratic men and 39 percent of Republican women think that’s the case.Whether there’s a balance to be struck between protections for accusers and the rights of those accused of sexual misconduct is part of America’s reckoning with the problem. Women and some men have come forward in recent months with allegations credible enough to topple titans of entertainment, news, and members of Congress — often with blinding speed. Just what is an unwelcome sexual advance, and whether there should be life-altering consequences for what some might see as just a dumb remark, have ignited ferocious exchanges across U.S. society.“On that side of it someone should have a chance to defend themselves,” said Cedar Rapids, Iowa, resident Emily Hass, 40, who says she’s confronted two people who harassed her. She’s among the 56 percent of Americans who think harassment is a major problem in U.S. workplaces. “Absolutely. I think we don’t even know the half of it.”A third of working Americans say sexual misconduct is a very serious problem in their own workplace, a feeling most common among women, minorities and lower-income Americans. Three in 10 women and 1 in 10 men say that they’ve personally experienced sexual misconduct at work.The tense discussion goes to the pinnacle of American government. Americans elected President Donald Trump even after they heard a recording of him boasting of groping women and knew he stood accused of assaulting or harassing more than a dozen women. He has denied any wrongdoing and has vowed to sue his accusers. Nearly a year into his presidency, that hasn’t happened.Misconduct allegations have been made against several members of Congress, including Sen. Al Franken, who plans to step down due to sexual assault accusations.Allegations of sexual misconduct, many of them denied, have forced a reconsideration of lifetimes of work by accused men, such as former President Bill Clinton, actor Kevin Spacey and Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein. And voters in overwhelmingly Republican Alabama on Dec. 12 elected a Democrat, Doug Jones, to the Senate for the first time in a quarter century. The Republican candidate, Roy Moore, stood accused of sexual misconduct with teenage girls while he was in his 30s. Moore denied the charges. Trump endorsed Moore.The poll shows that majorities of Americans think broad sectors of society are not doing enough to prevent sexual misconduct, including institutions including the entertainment industry, colleges and universities, state and federal governments, the military and the news media.The sweeping nature of the national reckoning shows no sign of being resolved soon, the poll found.Overall, two-thirds think sexual misconduct happens in most or even all workplaces and more than 8 in 10 say false accusations happen at least some of the time.And while a third of women worry at least somewhat about being victims, an equal percentage of men worry at least somewhat about being falsely accused.The abrupt firing of NBC’s Matt Lauer from the helm of the “Today” show this month rattled Cassida.“By the time I had heard about it, he had already been let go. And I kind of went, whoa,” said the Greencastle, Indiana, high school math teacher, a Democrat. NBC officials said they had identified a pattern of troubling behavior before giving Lauer the ax.Lee worries that the privacy of accusers is protected more than the names of the accused. “You always heard rumors about who was being accused. But you never heard who was doing the accusing.”Still the poll finds many hope the attention given to sexual misconduct will make a positive difference. Most Americans — 55 percent — think the spate of recent high-profile cases will result in change for the better for women.___The AP-NORC poll surveyed 1,020 adults from Dec. 7-11 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4.3 percentage points.last_img read more

Experiment shows connecting names with phone metadata is easy

first_img Explore further Federal judge rules NSA phone surveillance legal (Update) (Phys.org) —What kind of telephone activity does the NSA collect on people? Metadata. How harmful is it to your privacy health? Nada. It is only metadata. That has been the line drawn in the sand by government supporters of NSA activities in monitoring calls. Now a Stanford study by two researchers at Stanford has its own message: Individuals can be easily identified through phone numbers. Connecting metadata with individual names is not just easy; they found it was “trivial.” Jonathan Mayer along with Patrick Mutchler, the researchers, earlier this week on the blog Web Policy, which covers technology, policy, and law, posted their findings under the headline, “MetaPhone: The NSA’s Got Your Number.” Citation: Experiment shows connecting names with phone metadata is easy (2013, December 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-metadata-easy.html © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img They described their experiment to find out just how easy it might be through an Android app called MetaPhone, which garnered 5,000 phone numbers. MetaPhone is defined by the researchers as a “crowdsourced study of phone metadata.” In November, as a project of the Stanford Security Lab, the two posted a notice, “We’re studying the National Security Agency, and we need your help.” They referred to the NSA’s confirmation that it collects American phone records, and with little privacy impact. Nonetheless, they noted, “Phone metadata is inherently revealing. We want to rigorously prove it—for the public, for Congress, and for the courts.” In turn they said they sought to crowdsource the data for their study. to measure what can be inferred from phone records.”Participation takes just a few minutes,” they said. “You’re eligible if you’re in the United States, use an Android smartphone, and have a Facebook account.”The results of their MetaPhone trial and other research steps are in. “We randomly sampled 5,000 numbers from our crowdsourced MetaPhone dataset and queried the Yelp, Google Places, and Facebook directories,” they reported. Querying those three sources, they matched 1,356 (27.1%) of the numbers—378 hits (7.6%) on Yelp, 684 (13.7%) on Google Places, and 618 (12.3%) on Facebook.Then they took a next step with a random sample of 100 numbers from the dataset, to run Google searches on each. That effort did not even take an hour, where they were able to associate an individual or a business with 60 of the 100 numbers. Finally, they proceeded to run the numbers using Intelius. “Between Intelius, Google search, and our three initial sources, we associated a name with 91 of the 100 numbers.”The authors commented, “If a few academic researchers can get this far this quickly, it’s difficult to believe the NSA would have any trouble identifying the overwhelming majority of American phone numbers.”Mayer is a PhD student in computer science at Stanford , where he received his J.D. in 2013, Reacting to the report, Gregory Ferenstein in TechCrunch, said, “People may disagree about whether or not government agencies should have private information, but let’s not pretend they can’t learn anything they want from what information they have.”Meanwhile, a federal judge ruled on Friday that the National Security Agency’s collection of telephone records is lawful. Federal Judge William Pauley said there was no evidence that the Government has used any of the bulk metadata for any purpose other than investigating and disrupting terrorist attacks. More information: webpolicy.org/2013/12/23/metap … sas-got-your-number/ This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more