David Warner out for Australia with broken finger for ‘two to six weeks’

first_imgWarner was man of the match for his 109 from 120 balls, his sixth one-day international hundred, which moved Australia to the top of the three-team table.But he took a blow to his left index finger while fielding and an X-ray has revealed a fracture.”We will assess the situation over the coming days to see if the injury requires a surgical option but should that not be the case then David is likely to be available to return to play in somewhere between two and six weeks,” said Australia team doctor Geoffrey Verrall.A decision on Warner’s further participation in the competition will be made in the next few days, said a Cricket Australia spokesman.However, with the tournament ending on June 29, it seems likely that the 29-year-old’s tour is over.”It’s obviously disappointing to be sidelined given the form I’ve been in and given the important stage the tri-series is at, but it’s always important to look at the positives,” said Warner.”This downtime, however long or short it is, will give me the chance to freshen up and spend quality time with my family after an intense period of action, with a home summer that was followed by trips to New Zealand and South Africa, plus the World Twenty20 and the Indian Premier League.”AFPlast_img read more

Rocky World Is 17 Times as Massive as Earth

first_imgMost massive alien worlds are gas giants like Jupiter. But now, astronomers say they’ve found a new type of exoplanet: a rocky world much larger than Earth that may boast only a thin sheath of an atmosphere. The orb in question (in the foreground of artist’s concept), dubbed Kepler-10c, circles its 11-billion-year-old, sunlike star once every 45 days. Previously estimated to have a diameter about 2.3 times that of Earth (giving it a volume slightly more than 12 times our planet’s), new observations with ground-based sensors suggest that Kepler-10c is 17 times as hefty as Earth, the researchers report today in Boston at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society and in a forthcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. Those figures for mass and volume—which suggest a dense, rocky composition and seemingly discount a large, thick atmosphere—peg the planet as the first rocky “mega-Earth” to be found. Kepler-10c is surprising, the researchers say: Previously, astronomers surmised that any planet that massive would have gravitationally slurped up gases in its neighborhood as it formed, eventually growing to become a gas giant like those in the outer reaches of our solar system. The existence of large rocky worlds like Kepler-10c may boost the chances of potentially habitable worlds throughout the cosmos, the researchers contend.last_img read more