Colbert honored by festival

first_imgStephen Colbert, a faux conservative who often honors himself on his Comedy Central show, was lauded by the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival as its Person of the Year. “What an honor – an honor to receive and an honor for you to give to me,” Colbert said during the ceremony late Friday. Often appearing to be a combination of Bill O’Reilly and Archie Bunker, Colbert emphasized his TV character isn’t him. “He’s not malicious, he’s ill-informed, you know. It’s just a product of his own education. And he thinks he’s saying and doing the right thing; he’s not actually trying to hurt anybody,” Colbert said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Colbert said he is writing a book. It will be “what is best and what’s worst about America,” he said. “You know, it’s 20 subjects … all of the important things, the culture war, religion, hygiene, sports.” Colbert said he envisions his character preparing for each show by singing the Cheap Trick song “I Want You to Want Me,” and doing a full-body shave. Colbert said he never would have guessed a character based on O’Reilly would be given the honor. – Associated Press last_img read more

Southern Africa’s greenest dairy

first_imgThe greenest dairy in the southernhemisphere is due to open in October2011 in the Eastern Cape province.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library)The advanced OneStep technology meansmore efficient use of resources, and lowerenergy consumption.(Image: Coega Dairy)MEDIA CONTACTS • Dr Marlize SmitCoega Dairy marketing director+27 83 703 3727RELATED ARTICLES• Woolworths tests green refrigeration• Nestlé expands operations in SA• Saving SA’s abalone• SA firms turn to green pest control• VW builds R500m ‘green’ press shopWilma den HartighA newly established local dairy company has taken the lead in milk processing, and boasts the smallest carbon footprint of any dairy in the southern hemisphere.The idea to establish a dairy with green credentials came about in 2010, when a group of Eastern Cape dairy farmers decided that they wanted to create a facility that could add value to locally produced milk. The farmers wanted to maintain the high quality of their products, but also had a vision to process milk using more eco-friendly methods.The Coega Dairy initially invested R50-million (US$7.3-million) in advanced ultra-high temperature (UHT) processing equipment that makes it possible to produce UHT milk, also known as long life milk, more efficiently.Coega Dairy CEO Dr Hennie Kleynhans said that no other dairy in the region or on the continent has invested in the advanced technology, known as OneStep, and internationally, he is only aware of a dairy in Spain that is using it.According to Kleynhans, this is because the technology is new in the market and besides being very expensive to install, would require dairies to undergo a complete overhaul of existing infrastructure.However, given the cost squeeze on dairy producers in South Africa, Coega Dairy deemed the investment worthwhile.Local trade magazine DairyConnect reports that South African milk producers face tough competition from countries where milk can be produced more competitively or where farmers receive subsidies. In South Africa, producers also have to contend with increasing input costs and low producer prices.The founders of the Coega Dairy realised that the technology could help them overcome some of these challenges: it allows for more eco-friendly milk production while also performing exceptionally on cost savings.Investing in the best green technologyCoega Dairy’s marketing director Marlize Smit said that the new UHT processing plant is significantly more efficient than conventional UHT equipment used in other South African plants.The Coega plant makes use of OneStep technology, which reduces the need for various steps during production. This means that milk can be processed faster, using fewer resources, at a lower cost.Energy and water consumption is considerably reduced, while the end products, which also include butter and custards, still maintain their high quality and have enhanced taste profiles.“The new plant is one of the most modern UHT plants, and one of the top green dairy plants in the world,” Smit said.The processing unit uses half as much energy, water and chemicals and generates 50% less effluent, of which 65% is recycled. The technology cuts carbon dioxide emissions by 40%, which results in a lower carbon footprint compared to world average values.According to Kleynhans, ordinary dairy plants use three litres of water to produce one litre of milk. In comparison, the OneStep technology makes it possible to use only 300ml of water per litre of milk. He noted that some dairies can use less water using traditional technology, but this is difficult as it requires extreme efficiency.Greening the dairy industryThe dairy industry struggles with eco-friendly operations. Production plants require daily cleaning, and this uses large quantities of water and chemicals. Cleaning chemicals are expensive and once used, are released in the effluent, which could harm the environment.“Many dairies do treat their water, but this is still not efficient,” said Kleynhans.Unlike traditional dairy plants, the OneStep technology design only requires cleaning every 60 hours, using fewer chemicals. This means less water and fewer chemicals, but an increase in production time, as less downtime has to be scheduled for cleaning.Establishing a green dairy and sourcing milk from farmers using eco-friendly farming methods is a step in the right direction for the local dairy industry. For the consumer, it also shows that farmers and the rest of the value chain know how important it is to produce food and beverages more sustainably.The switch to green technology anticipates changing consumer demands.“Eastern Cape dairy farmers are being pro-active. Consumers expect green products these days. It isn’t an option anymore,” said Smit.The farmers are also working towards greening the entire value chain, from the farm to the consumer.Smit said that the Coega Dairy will source milk predominantly from pasture fed cows raised in the province’s unpolluted surroundings.Coega Dairy products will be packaged in paper cartons, of which the majority can be reclaimed and recycled to make new paper products. The milk will also not be transported over long distances, which reduces the logistics and transport carbon emissions.Representative ownershipAt the moment 13 commercial milk farmers own the Coega Dairy, but next year the ownership structure of the company will change to ensure a benefit for all participants in the value chain.By 2012, dairy farm workers, black farmers and farm managers and factory workers will own 40% of the company’s shares.Additionally, said Kleynhans, the dairy will have a further positive economic impact on the Eastern Cape by creating 350 direct and 750 indirect jobs.Towards the end of 2011 when the plant becomes operational, milk will be sourced from black owned and managed dairy farms, many of which are highly successful.“These farmers milk over 25 000 litres of milk daily,” said Kleynhans. “Some also own close to 2 000 cows and on a properly managed farm, farmers can milk 15 to 20 litres of milk per cow per day.”Ownership of the company will be expanded further to include joint ventures with Amadlelo, a black empowerment agri-business concern, with the purpose of training black farm managers through shared milk production.Construction underwayThe Coega Dairy is currently under construction at the Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) just outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. It will be fully operational in October this year.Kleynhans said that with the infrastructure available, the road network and a reliable source of power at the Coega IDZ, it was the most suitable site for the new dairy.Extensive environmental impact assessments and relocation of vegetation, animals and insects were also undertaken before construction started.“Vegetation, animals, insects and even spiders, snakes and rats were relocated to a nearby site,” he said.Next year the Coega Dairy plans to install a second plant at the site. This will be valued at R192-million ($28.6-million) and will include value-adding equipment.last_img read more

Martin to lead Field to Faucet program

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest While some would say people are the problem behind Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms, Jay Martin will say they’re the solution.Martin was recently chosen to lead Field to Faucet, a water quality program launched by The Ohio State University to ensure safe drinking water while maintaining an economically productive agricultural sector.“It became obvious, when I was working in Louisiana on a project to manage Delta land loss and salinity, that working with the people was the key to success,” Martin said. Martin did his PhD dissertation at Louisiana State University on the interdisciplinary nature of protecting coastal areas via engineering, social sciences and marine biology.Now, Martin is an ecological engineer in Ohio State’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering. For the past 10 years, he has focused on the Lake Erie basin, again in concert with researchers from a variety of disciplines.Field to Faucet was conceived and funded by Bruce McPheron, Ohio State’s vice president for agricultural administration and dean for the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, which put $1 million toward the effort after dangerous microcystin levels in Lake Erie shut down Toledo’s water supply for two days in August 2014. Microcystin is a toxin made by some algae.“Jay’s interdisciplinary approach in Louisiana and here in Ohio made him the ideal leader for Field to Faucet,” McPheron said. “Solving the water quality problem in Ohio will take many minds. Jay has the ability to bring people together to solve this complicated issue.”Field to Faucet involves researchers from multiple Ohio State colleges and other regional universities. Already, five projects have launched, Martin said.1. One app under development will allow farmers to record nutrient application rates and methods. Future plans include developing further apps geared toward nutrient stewardship.2. Another project will develop a geospatial data warehouse with controlled access that will allow producers and researchers to secure and share publicly available data. It is likely the project will later serve as a model approach for a national program.3. Another focus is removing phosphorus and nitrogen from manure and from anaerobic digester discharge before these materials are applied to fields. This effort would especially benefit the watershed around Grand Lake St. Marys in western Ohio, where there are a large number of livestock farms.4. Unmanned aerial vehicles will be used in another project to provide real-time concentrations of microcystin in Lake Erie’s waters.5. The final project will develop a sensor to detect real-time concentrations of microcystin in Lake Erie’s waters.Martin also will serve as the faculty leader of the university’s Global Water Initiative, an umbrella effort from the Office of Research that encompasses Field to Faucet along with Wells to Wellness, a water supply endeavor starting in Tanzania, and Coastal Resiliency, an international disaster preparedness effort.In addition, Martin will be working with Ohio Sea Grant, which is housed at Ohio State, which is managing the funding and reporting of related water quality projects recently funded by $2 million from the Ohio Board of Regents and matched by Ohio State and other universities across Ohio to address harmful algal blooms.last_img read more

Breeding for faster-growing bluegills and yellow perch

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Inside cool water-filled tanks in southern Ohio, the laws of nature are being defied. Female yellow perch mate with other female yellow perch; male bluegills with other male bluegills.This might make one wonder, unless, of course, your profession is selective breeding of fish, and your goal is to get them to grow faster. Hanping Wang, who manages The Ohio State University’s Ohio Center for Aquaculture Research and Development, has succeeded in raising faster-growing fish by artificially mating them in a not so typical way.On average, the resulting offspring reach market size six months faster than bluegills or yellow perch bred out of standard male-female mating. That’s because among yellow perch, females grow quicker than males. Among bluegills, males grow faster than females.For an Ohio fish farmer, having fish that mature faster than average could be a significant savings in fish food and in time waiting to sell them, said Wang, whose center in Piketon is part of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). The aim of the center is to spur the state’s aquaculture industry, in part through research on two of the state’s most common fish: yellow perch and bluegill.Aquaculture, the practice of raising fish in a controlled environment of indoor tanks or outdoor ponds, is slowly growing, but still a relatively small Ohio industry. In 2017, 227 people in the state had permits allowing them to sell seafood. Any advances in farming that make it faster or easier to raise fish or shellfish could prove useful and profitable.“We’re using the animals’ maximum potential to make them grow faster for human benefit,” Wang said. “We have to do it this way to meet the growing need for food, specifically protein. You need to have a process to produce more animals — more chickens, cows, pigs and fish.”Among yellow perch, the females grow 60 to 70% faster than the males, and they grow larger than the males. As a result, it makes sense that a breeder would want to produce the fastest-growing female yellow perch. So Wang did exactly that. He mated females to females with the help of grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the state-based Ohio Sea Grant program, which funds research in the Great Lakes and aquaculture.On average, it takes a farmer 16 months to raise a yellow perch to reach market size. Now it can take as little as 10 months if neo-males are mated with typical female yellow perch, Wang said.“The farmer saves on labor, saves on feed and saves on space,” he said.With bluegills, the males grow faster and bigger than the females. So, Wang took males and mated them with males through a process similar to what was done with the yellow perch, so they became what Wang calls “neo-females.” The offspring of a neo-female bluegill and a male bluegill were all male fish that could grow to 1 pound, the size needed to sell them, in about a year, cutting three to five months off the typical time needed for them to mature.“It doesn’t matter if it’s a fish or a tomato or a soybean, if you can shorten the amount of time it takes to grow the item to market size while still maintaining the same nutritional quality, that will just improve the farmer’s profit margin,” said Matthew Smith, an OSU Extension aquaculture specialist. Smith’s main priority is expanding sustainable, profitable fish farms in Ohio.Aquaculture can play a critical role as our oceans and Great Lakes are overfished, Smith said. “It’s a way to provide a balance.”last_img read more

Two militants killed in Shopian encounter

first_imgTwo militants have been killed in a gunfight with security forces in south Kashmir’s Shopian on Friday, police said.In the morning, security forces zeroed in on the militants, triggering the gun battle.Initial reports suggest that the security forces launched the operation in an orchard in Dragad area of the Zainapora belt in Shopian. It followed a tip-off.”The militants opened fire when the security forces zeroed in on them. The operation is on,” said the police.The area has been cordoned and more reinforcements were rushed to the spot.last_img

Arsenal will sell Alexis Sanchez on one condition

first_imgTransfers Arsenal will sell Alexis Sanchez to Man City on one condition Chris Wheatley Last updated 2 years ago 19:23 8/31/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Alexis Sanchez Arsenal Getty Images Transfers Manchester City Arsenal Premier League A. Sánchez The Gunners are expected to allow the Chilean to join City if they can sign a replacement before the 11pm UK deadline Arsenal will only sanction the sale of Alexis Sanchez to Manchester City if they can bring in a world class replacement for Thursday’s 11pm UK time transfer deadline, Goal understands.Chilean star Sanchez, 28, has been courted by City all summer and wants to link up with his former manager Pep Guardiola who sees him as the final piece in the puzzle to mount a title challenge this season.Arsenal 7/1 to win Europa League Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Alexis has rejected the offer of a new deal at the Emirates Stadium with his current contract set to expire in the summer of 2018, and City have been confident for several months that the player’s stance will lead to Arsenal eventually giving into his demands.City had been confident of bringing Alexis to the Etihad Stadium, but the Gunners have been steadfast in their insistence that the Chile international is not for sale and rejected a £50 million offer from the Etihad side as recently as Tuesday.However, the Gunners are prepared to let last season’s star man leave the club for a fee in the region of £70m if they can bring in a replacement of similar quality, with Paris Saint-Germain star Julian Draxler one of several options the club are looking at.Sanchez is expected to start for Chile in their World Cup qualifier against Paraguay tonight which kicks off 30 minutes after the transfer window closes in the United Kingdom.last_img read more