‘Make 2010 an African brand’

first_img16 August 2006South Africa should place the message used during the 2010 World Cup bid – “Africa’s time has come” – at the heart of its communications in the run-up to the event, says Government Communications CEO Themba Maseko. Speaking at the first 2010 National Communication Partnership Conference in Johannesburg on Tuesday, Maseko emphasised the need to have a core brand for the first African World Cup through which both the country and the continent as a whole could be promoted.He said research indicated that at least 80% of South Africans thought it proper to project the 2010 World Cup as an African World Cup. South Africa therefore needed to start building links with communicators from other countries on the continent. All resources from the conference are available on the International Marketing Council website Maseko’s comments were echoed by Minister in the Presidency Essop Pahad, who told delegates that discussions on how the continent should work together for 2010 would be high on the agenda at the African Union’s next meeting in January 2007.SA’s communicators, Pahad said, had an important role to play in ensuring that the soccer tournament would be remembered for decades to come “as an event that left our country and the continent more united and confident.“We need to convey the message that South Africa is alive with possibilities and the continent with great opportunities.”Countering negative perceptionsNegative international media reports about South Africa were also of concern, Maseko said.“In 2009, on the eve of the tournament, we will be holding general elections … We will have to create an environment where political parties do not send out negative impressions during their campaigns, because it will influence international perceptions.“The gap between foreign perceptions about South Africa and the real strengths of the country is narrowing – but it is still too wide. 2010 must be used as an opportunity to close this gap further.”Maseko said that operational and resource plans for all aspects of the World Cup were in place, and that the government was working with all stakeholders to ensure that citizens owned the event.The 2010 National Communication Partnership Task Team would hold workshops around the country to inform communities about opportunities available during the World Cup, Maseko said.With only one-third of the three million 2010 match tickets available for South African soccer fans, South Africa needed to think beyond stadiums, as most fans would be watching the matches from “fan parks”.While Fifa would exercise tight sponsorship control over the tournament, there would be “huge” advertising and branding opportunities at these fan parks, Maseko said.Tuesday’s conference was the first in a series of 2010 National Communication Partnership Conferences, to be held annually over the next four years in order to help the country’s communicators build and implement a shared strategy for the World Cup.It was hosted by the International Marketing Council of South Africa on behalf of the 2010 National Communication Partnership Task Team, which includes representatives from the government, business and the 2010 Local Organising Committee.SouthAfrica.info reporter and BuaNews Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Sasol gets women – and water – wise

first_imgThrough the Women Empowerment Strategy, Sasol’s Nolitha Fakude aims to create a safe and fulfilling work environment for women in the company. (Image: oecd.org) • Jacqui O’Sullivan Vice President: Group Corporate Branding and Communication Dusi Canoe Marathon +27 82 883 9697 jacqui.osullivan@sasol.com • Celebrating 60 years of the Women’s Charter • Female refugees face particular problems • Mandela: a champion for women’s rights • South African research funding fourth-highest in the world • Top female chefs dice it out for Mzansi honours Shamin ChibbaIt is difficult to speak of mining alongside women’s rights and environmental sustainability. Mining is an adversary to both causes as it is a major pollutant and an unforgiving environment for women. But when Nolitha Fakude became Sasol’s executive vice president for sustainability and human resources in 2005, environmental and women’s issues became a major concern for the petroleum company.When Fakude first took up her post, she set out to clean up Sasol’s water use. It was under her eye that Sasol launched Water Sense, an initiative that aims to implement the company’s water sustainability policies across all its operations around the world.Under her leadership, Sasol had decreased water use from 151-million cubic metres in 2011 to 148-million cubic metres in 2012. It also recycled nearly 143-million cubic metres of water in 2012 compared to 128-million cubic metres in 2011. And according to Fakude, the company will further improve the way it uses water.Sasol had also teamed up with Emfuleni Municipality and sustainable development services company Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit on a project that saved 1-million cubic metres of water and created about 80 plumbing, water conservation and learner technician jobs created in the local community.The 49-year-old’s goal is not only to make Sasol an environmentally sustainable company, but also a company that promotes gender equality within the workplace. Nolitha Fakude, CEO Magazine’s Most Influential Woman in Business and Government for 2014. (Image: GCIS) Fakude has been involved in implementing three initiatives that aim to create a safe and fulfilling work environment for women in the company. The Sasol Women’s Network runs a number of mentoring programmes that provide women with the appropriate skills to excel in the company. Additionally, Sasol’s Women Empowerment Strategy has also helped women in the company to reach their full potential. The Women in Mining Development Programme is an ongoing attraction, growth and retention plan which focuses on the development of women across all levels of the business. As a result, women already occupy 22.6% of all management positions at Sasol Mining.Fakude’s involvement in bettering women’s standing in the mining industry earned her the top honour in the Mining and Petrochemical Sector category at the CEO Magazine Most Influential Women in Business and Government Awards in July 2014.Despite the changes she has made at the petrochemical company, Fakude believes that there is still more work that needs to be done to ensure women are fully accepted in the workplace across all sectors. Speaking from the World Economic Forum summit in Davos in 2011, Fakude said that an economy cannot be run without women. She added that although South Africa has legislation that enables equality in the workplace, the results are not what the country had hoped for. “As we moved forward with Black Economic Empowerment the focus was more on black and less on women. Women and gender issues are very much linked to black issues. You cannot talk about black without talking about black women.”last_img read more

Ayodhya case main litigant Mahant Bhaskar Das dead

first_imgMahant Bhaskar Das, the main litigant in the Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhoomi case, passed away in Ayodhya on September 16. He was 89.The seer, head of Nirmohi Akhada, was a petitioner in the case since 1959. He was admitted to a private medical facility on September 12 following breathing problems where he later suffered a brain stroke. The seer will be cremated at the Tulsi ghat in Ayodhya later on September 16, close associates told IANS.Doctors had earlier advised that he be taken to a super-speciality hospital either in Lucknow or Delhi. However, the ageing priest refused to leave the temple town. Faizabad MP Lallu Singh, former UPCC president Nirmal Khatri and several local BJP and RSS leaders besides others paid their homage to the seer. All shops in the Hanumangarhi area in Ayodhya have downed their shutters as a mark of respect. The seer’s disciples recalled that he had cordial relations with Hashim Ansari, the oldest litigant in the case, who passed away in July 2016.last_img read more

In UP, power supply still a dream for 1.3 crore households

first_img In the absence of power supply, most residents of Barinpurwa have solar panels, ranging from 20 to 100 watts, installed on their rooftops or in the open. Ranjeeta has a 40-watt solar panel, which cost her ₹4,500, installed on her roof. “I bought it 10 months ago. It serves basic needs but during foggy days and during the rains we have to live in darkness,” she said.While the Centre recently claimed that it had electrified the last inhabited village in the country, 3.13 crore households in India still live without electricity. The highest number of such households are in Uttar Pradesh, 1.33 crore.Only 56% households are electrified in the state, as per the Centre’s Saubhagya scheme portal. Only Jharkhand fares worse than UP, at 48%.The figure for Barabanki, where Barinpurwa is located, is below average, at 51%, but slightly better than districts like Jalaun, Jhansi and Lalitpur, all in Bundelkhand, which have only 25, 27 and 26% of households electrified even today.Last September, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched the Saubhagya scheme to provide “last mile connectivity and service connections to all remaining households in both rural and urban areas to achieve universal household electrification” by December 31, 2018. The task in UP is clearly uphill. According to the state government, from October 2017 to March 2018, it gave out 15.88 lakh power connections under the scheme, out of which 8.77 lakh were handed out to poor families. Oil lamp is the popular source of light in Barinpurwa. | Photo Credit: Rajeev Bhatt | Photo Credit: Rajeev Bhatt The market of Tiwaripur majra in Kolahda village where residents have installed solar panel in open area.  According to Saubhagya portal, 4.21 lakh households were electrified in UP in January, 5.41 lakh in February, 1.50 lakh in March and 2.45 lakh in April. Last year, the state also claimed to provide electricity to 61,000 majras and targets another 62 lakh in 2018.However, residents of Tiwaripur majra in Kolahda village are still without power. Shailendri Tiwari’s house is one of them. Electric wires pass through right outside her house, but the family still does not have a power connection.The poles supply power to the next hamlet as hers is still being surveyed by officials. “When the power department people came to install these poles, I asked them to connect it to my house, but they demanded ₹35,000 for the cables and transformer. Now, if I had that much money, wouldn’t I purchase a big solar roof?” asked Shailendri.Her family depends on tiny emergency lights, which are charged through a 20-watt solar panel. She does not use lamps as she is no longer entitled for kerosene. The lack of electric supply poses great challenges to her four daughters, all of whom are in school. The family has been regularly writing to the electricity department requesting electrification of their majra. On February 5, the department finally wrote back saying that the majra was still being surveyed under the ‘Power for All’ scheme, which was launched jointly by the Centre and state last April, and that the households would be electrified by December 2018.Executive engineer of the UP Power Corporation (Madhyanchal), Bhaskar, said the households still left to be electrified were being surveyed and on April 12 the work in his area had been deputed to Bajaj Electricals.“They are carrying out the door-to-door survey, finding out which village has households left behind. They will also do the electrification bit, be it fitting poles or putting up transformers,” said Bhaskar.UP Power Minister Shrikant Sharma said he was confident of achieving the target of total electrification of the remaining households in the state by December as the infrastructure for Saubhagya scheme was ready on the ground.When the BJP came to power in UP, he said, the state had 1.87 crore un-electrified households, but in one year the BJP government gave out connections to 36 lakh people.“If you compare, the track record of the last 15 years comes to 6.5 lakh connections per year. While in one year, we have given out 36 lakh connections. You can estimate the speed at which we are working,” he said. Barinpurwa is a Dalit majra — majra being a hamlet — with a population of 250-300, within the Manodharpur gram sabha of Barabanki district. While the gram sabha is technically electrified, the residents of Barinpurva still have to rely on kerosene lamps to beat the darkness. Many of them have installed solar panels for basic power supply. The village is located barely 50 km from the capital of Uttar Pradesh.Durgesh Bari’s house, located at the entry to the majra, does not have a fan or a TV set as he has no power supply. There is not a single electric pole or transformer in the majra. While the kitchen is kept out of darkness by kerosene lamps, a 20-watt solar panel helps charge mobile phones and tiny emergency lights so that the children can study in the evening. And when that fails, the family relies on a shop at the village square to charge phones at a nominal fee though a generator.“Last year some people came with electric poles and dug pits too. The women were so excited they helped them dig. But before they could plant them in our majra, they took the poles back and installed them in the neighbouring majra, saying they had come here due to a clerical mistake,” said Durgesh, pointing to the dug-out patches outside his house. That was the closest the Dalit family, which farms 1.5 bigha land for survival, came to having a power connection.Sudha, Durgesh’s mother, said the going gets tough during peak summer when the heat makes life difficult under the tin roof without a fan. “When it gets unbearable, I run to the trees for shade,” she says.Moreover, the family has to utilise the kerosene frugally as the household only gets 2 litres per month in ration, added Sudha.last_img read more

Indian soldier dies in Pakistan firing

first_imgOne soldier was killed in a fierce exchange of fire on the Line of Control (LoC) in Rajouri as Pakistan resorted to “unprovoked” ceasefire violation in Pir Panchal Valley’s Rajouri district and the Kashmir Valley and two Jaish-e-Muhammad (JeM) militants, including a ‘commander’, were killed in an encounter in Anantnag on Tuesday.A Jammu-based Army spokesman identified the soldier killed as Naik Krishan Lal. “The Pakistan Army resorted to unprovoked ceasefire violation along the LoC in Sunderbani Sector in Rajouri on Tuesday. The Indian Army responded strongly and effectively. Heavy damage to Pakistani Army posts and casualties to Pakistani soldiers have been inflicted by our troops,” he said.Rajouri and Poonch districts have witnessed intermittent incidents of ceasefire violations by Pakistan in the past one week, which left a 12-day infant dead and two civilians injured.Pakistani troops also resorted to heavy firing and shelling in Kashmir’s Kupwara from 1 p.m. up to 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday. The residents of Karnah had to ran for cover as shells rained near residential areas. Nazir Ahmad, a local, said his family members were stranded at different locations for many hours due to the sudden shelling.“Two residents received minor injuries and were shifted to the Sub-District Hospital, Tangdhar. Both are out of danger,” said sub-divisional magistrate Dr. Alyas Ahmad.National Conference (NC) president and Srinagar MP Dr. Farooq Abdullah said it was the population living across the LoC that had to bear the brunt of escalation of tension between India and Pakistan.“It’s high-time both the countries respected the dignity of lives of people living across the border. The need of the hour calls for total cessation of hostilities,” he said.2 Jaish militants killedThe police said the slain militants were JeM commander Fayaz Panzoo from Tral and his associate Shaan Showkat from Kanalwan area.“Panzoo was a top commander and was involved in an attack on the CRPF in Anantnag town on June 12 this year, which left five CRPF personnel and one police officer dead,” said the police.last_img read more

Cojuangco: PH will end Olympic drought with 5 golds in Tokyo 2020

first_img“I already have two sure candidates in mind,” said Cojuangco during the thanksgiving mass and dinner party for the Philippine Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games delegation Friday night at V Corporate building in Makati City.Cojuangco, however, declined to name the athletes and the national sports associations who can make history by delivering the first-ever gold medal for the Philippines in the Olympics.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I have a strong feeling they can win it. But I don’t want to mention the sport; I don’t want to pressure them,” said the POC chief. “We just have to fuel them up with high-octane gasoline and their performances can translate into gold medals.”Cojuangco said the athletes are homegrown but hinted that other potential gold medals could also come from swimmers and tracksters based in the United States. “We need a training center to achieve this. Without a training center, getting those medals will be difficult,” he pointed out.According to Cojuangco, there’s already a masterplan for the construction of a new sports facility in Clark Green City while the POC is also looking at another site in Iba, Zambales, to put up a training center.The Philippines could only settle for another silver medal courtesy of weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz in the 2016 Rio De Janeiro Games, 20 years after boxer Mansueto “Onyok” Velasco delivered the last medal for the country with a silver performance in the 1996 Atlanta Games.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ateneo bags sixth win, hands NU third straight loss BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president POC President Peping Cojuangco. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe Philippines won’t simply end the country’s gold medal drought in the Olympics in the 2020 Tokyo Games. But it’s going to do so in style.Philippine Olympic Committee president Jose Cojuangco Jr. believes Filipino athletes are capable of winning five gold medals in Tokyo, but only if the country puts up the proper training facilities needed for these athletes to succeed.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games View comments Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Nextlast_img read more

PHOTOS: Children Reading with State Minister Terrelonge

first_imgMinister of State in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Hon. Alando Terrelonge (left), interacts with students of Half-Way Tree Primary School, today (May 7), to mark Read Across Jamaica Day. This forms part of activities slated for Education Week, observed from May 5 to 11, under the theme ‘Empowering Educators: Retooling, Innovating, Networking for Sustainable Development’.last_img

Inviting indigenous people into economy means 277B economic boost report

first_imgThe Canadian PressOTTAWA _ The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board says Canada’s GDP would get an annual boost of $27.7 billion if barriers were removed to ensure Indigenous people can participate in the economy.The group’s latest report, to be released Tuesday, says equal economic opportunity for Indigenous peoples would help Canada address ongoing economic challenges caused by low productivity and demographic pressure from an aging population.It also notes the productivity of Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples would match that of their non-Indigenous counterparts if they received the same level of education and training.The report says an additional $8.5 billion in income could be earned every year by the Indigenous workforce if education and training gaps are closed.For example, it suggests B.C. could stand to benefit to the tune of $1.4 billion a year in additional income earned by more than 125,000 workers, while Ontario could bring in an additional $2 billion through more than 169,000 workers.The board says the Indigenous labour force is underutilized, despite the fact the Indigenous population is young and growing fast.Dawn Madahbee Leach, the board’s interim chair, says economic development can also assist in reconciliation efforts.“I can tell you first-hand, when somebody is provided with a job, they are able to provide for their families with regards to basic needs like shelter and food and then they become a role model for their children,” she said.“This report deals … with helping our people to help themselves through employment, through education and training.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

Starbucks Canada closes stores for training on race bias inclusion

first_imgStarbucks closed about 1,100 Canadian locations this afternoon for training on race, bias and inclusion.This @Starbucks on 5 St. and 6 Ave SW is one of about 1,100 locations across Canada closing early for inclusiveness training today. #yyc pic.twitter.com/Pvs7qIVm6e— Crystal Laderas (@CrisLaderas) June 11, 2018In a letter to customers, Starbucks Canada president Michael Conway says the training will involve sharing experiences, listening to experts, reflecting on the realities of bias in society and talking about how employees can create public spaces where everyone feels like they belong.The training comes after the Seattle-based company publicly apologized for the arrest of two black men who had been refused permission to use the washroom of a Starbucks coffee shop in Philadelphia.In his letter, Conway calls the incident “reprehensible” and says the training isn’t just about what happened in Philadelphia, but about humanity and making sure all customers feel safe and welcome.In late May, 8,000 U.S. locations were shut for an afternoon for similar training.last_img read more

Fort St John crosswalks to display walk symbol by default

first_imgThis means that for pedestrians walking along primary roads, the walk signal will be displayed by default when the traffic light turns green, without the need to push the activation button. For pedestrians crossing primary roads, even if the activation button is pressed after the light has turned green, the walk signal will be displayed during that light cycle, provided the minimum green timing is not exceeded. The changes mean that it will be less likely that pedestrians will need to wait for a traffic light to complete a full cycle before the walk signal displays allowing them to cross the road. However, Shopland said that advance left turn signals will also display before the pedestrian signal if they have been activated by the presence of a vehicle in the left turn lane.Shopland also said in his report that a chirper will be added to the crosswalk at the intersection of 100 Ave. and 96 St. He added that with the change to a rest in walk state, the unit will chirp continually, and staff are investigating what will be required to activate this feature only when the button is pushed. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Crosswalks in Fort St. John will be getting a bit more pedestrian-friendly in the near future after councillors voted in favour of modifying intersections to display the ‘walk’ symbol by default.Earlier this month, Council voted in favour of a motion by Mayor Lori Ackerman for staff to look at ways of making intersections in Fort St. John more pedestrian-friendly. The Mayor’s motion was made in the wake of recommendations from Urban Systems on how to improve the quality of life in Fort St. John during the winter months.At Monday’s council meeting, Integrated Services General Manager Victor Shopland recommended that staff modify the traffic control signals to allow for non-actuated coordinated and pedestrian recall walk signals on primary streets, as well as pedestrian-activated walk signals on side streets. A pedestrian in Fort St. John misses a green light in Fort St. John. New changes to traffic light operation mean that the walk signal will be displayed by default along primary roads. Photo by Chris Newton. A green traffic light in Fort St. John with the advance left turn signal lit. Photo by Chris Newtonlast_img read more