Categories
rgyglhism

WPA must ensure it’s on the right side of history

first_imgDear Editor,We are now past the midway point of the APNU+AFC government in office. It is that time when the Government is taking stock of its performance in office and actively preparing for the next elections. It is in this light that the firing of Dr David Hinds and Lincoln Lewis as columnists must be examined.There is a general consensus that both Hinds and Lewis were critics of the Government, despite the fact that they were also supporters of the Government — not unusual roles for these two persons with a long history in the political struggle of Guyana. They both were outspoken critics of the PPP/C government, and worked for the removal of the PPP/C regime.There is a fundamental difference between critique and criticism. It is one thing to tell someone that their shoes need polishing in order to raise them up to a higher level. It is another thing to say that their shoes need polishing in order to ridicule them.Hinds and Lewis should have been appreciated for the role they played in alerting the regime to the shortcomings of the Government policies, providing an invaluable service, one that the supporters of the regime did not perform, perhaps blinded by a narcissistic impulse of party loyalty gaining paramountcy over critical thinking.It was rather ingenious for the AFC, several months ago, to claim that David Hinds was the beneficiary of the freedom that the present regime had fought for. The AFC obviously has no understanding of the historical struggle for Guyana’s freedom. Dr. Hinds spent several years in Burnham’s prison in his effort to rid Guyana of a dictatorship. So did Tacuma Ogunseye. These men do not roll over and play dead in the struggle for democracy. They did not do it in the darkest of days, and it is unlikely that they will do so now.What is not a self-evident truth is who were responsible for the firing of these two columnists from the state-owned Guyana Chronicle. There has been many readings of the tea leaves on this matter, and any gestalt psychologist will interpret the speculations with extreme caution.Were the WPA totally compliant with the Government in terms of lauding all of its efforts in governing, it would have been welcomed as a dutiful member of the Government. Unfortunately, the WPA is burdened with its history of fighting against the PNC dictatorship, and is held to a higher standard than the other political parties. This is expected as a birthright, given the assassination of its leader, Dr. Walter Rodney, and other activists that lost their lives in the struggle against the PNC dictatorship.If the assault on Dr David Hinds is symptomatic of the contempt for the WPA by the PNC/R and the AFC, it is a foregone conclusion that the current Government seems convinced that the criticism by the WPA and its members is a serious liability in the forthcoming elections.Tacuma Ogunseye’s historical analysis is rather enlightening, and he made the point that the WPA was accepted into APNU not as a ‘silent’ partner, but one with an uncompromising record of struggle against censorships of all kind.The WPA, having fought to remove the PPP/C and to bring the APNU+AFC regime into power, was expected to give the Government some time to get its act together. Ogunseye noted that in the aftermath of the 2015 elections, the APNU grouping never met to have any discussions regarding governance. During this period, many decisions were taken without consultation with the WPA, despite having troubling consequences for the WPA.The WPA’s exclusion from the decision-making process reached a crisis level last year, leading to an emergency meeting being held. There was much hype after the meeting, but time has revealed that it was just that, hype.The WPA is left with no choice but to sound the warning bell, or be smothered by its silence if it does not rebel or revolt against its treatment by the current Government. Three years is enough time to test the goodwill of the Government towards the WPA.It could not be expected to attack the Government from day one if it felt maltreated, despite the debacle concerning the shutting down of the Walter Rodney Commission of Inquiry. It had to give the Government enough time to have a track record that could be critically examined. It has done so for the past three years, and has paid a terrible price in the process. But it cannot remain silent if it is to remain alive as a viable political entity.We are at a point in the life of the present Government where there is a public outcry for the WPA to remain true to its Rodneyite agenda, for it not to betray the legacy of its assassinated leader. This is a remarkable moment in Guyana’s historical development. Is it possible that this is the historical moment that the WPA has struggled for?Sincerely,Rohit Kanhai,WPA OverseasMember (WPAOA)last_img read more

Categories
blsonlcct

Police seek stolen items in break in of local business

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The local RCMP is investigating a break in that occurred at at Continental Pipeline on Old Hope Road in Charlie Lake last week.Cpl. Dave Tyreman said an exact time is not known but officers believe the crime occurred over night on February 25, or the early morning of February 26.In the break in, thieves took a Bobcat Loader Model 770, a 2012 White Dodge Ram 3500 with a BC licence plate reading JF8988, and various shop tools.- Advertisement -However, the Bobcat was recovered by the owner on March 1, hidden in bushes near 273 and 242 roads.Police are asking anyone with more information about this crime to contact them at 250-787-8140.Continental Pipeline could not be reached for a comment.Advertisementlast_img

Categories
rgyglhism

Do Fossil Counts Match Sediment Counts?

first_imgIf evolution is true, the number of species coming and going should track the number of rock layers in which they are fossilized, at least roughly.  The more sediments per unit time, the more new genera should arise within them.  Shanan E. Peters (U of Michigan) decided to test this “novel” approach with marine fossils (the most abundant in the fossil record) over most of the geologic column, from Cambrian to Pliocene, and did indeed find a correlation.  He wrote his conclusions in PNAS.1    Peters compared two databases: one that counted genera of marine organisms in the worldwide geologic column, and one that counted rock sections in the geologic column in the USA.  (A section is a record of continuous sedimentation bounded by gaps, or unconformities.)  First, he graphed genus richness against rock quantity; these measurements correlated well until the Cretaceous, when they diverged sharply.  The divergence, he explained, could have been a statistical artifact of sampling called the “pull of the recent”; i.e., the tendency for recent epochs to be better represented than ancient ones.  That’s OK, he explained; one would expect the correlations to be seen better at macro rather than micro scales.  Second, he graphed first and last appearances of genera against the bottoms and tops of rock sections.  These correlated fairly well for extinctions (r=0.75), but not as well for originations of genera (r=0.54 or less).  “This finding means,” he tells us, “that the average longevity of a genus in the fossil record is comparable with the average duration of a sedimentary section.  In fact, the entire frequency distribution of genus longevities is remarkably similar to that of section durations.”  Third, he compared genus turnover with section turnover and also found similar positive correlation, though with some data points as prominent outliers.  In his concluding discussion, he tried to explain what these correlations mean.These results demonstrate that the temporal distribution of genus first and last occurrences in the marine animal fossil record is intimately related to the temporal continuity and quantity of sedimentary rock.  Determining why this result is the case is more challenging than demonstrating that it is so. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Since the two databases (genus counts and section counts) were presumed “as independent as two data sets that share the same timescale could possibly be,” he felt the correlations, rough as they were, indicated something significant.  Either the results were artifacts of preservation bias (the luck of the fossilization process), or had a common-cause relationship.  The former, he argued, seems unlikely: “Thus, if stratigraphic correlation and the shared timescale are the only reasons for statistical similarity, then virtually all temporal patterns derived from the geologic record must be little more than methodological artifacts of binning and correlation.  This possibility seems extremely unlikely (although quantifying the magnitudes of the statistical contributions of these factors is very important).”  That being agreed, which explanation – selection bias or common cause – best explains the data?Assuming that macroevolutionary patterns derived from genus first and last occurrences have the potential to be meaningful in a biological sense, the task then becomes to explain why patterns in the genus fossil record are closely duplicated by analogous patterns in the sedimentary rock record.  As discussed above, there are two possibilities, (i) preservation bias and (ii) shared forcing mechanisms (common cause).He showed that the latter possibility makes better predictions, but does admit one caveat: “because only unconformity and rock quantity biases are being measured here, it is possible that facies biases and/or asymmetries in environmental preservation within sedimentary sequences are causing the stronger section-genus extinction correlation”; i.e., the beginning and end of the story don’t always reveal what happened in the middle.  Nevertheless, he felt confident that taxonomists and geologists had not conspired to bias the conclusions: “it seems unlikely that the work of hundreds of taxonomists has been so nonrandom as to render the survivorship patterns of >32,000 genera from across the tree of life little more than a quantification of the structure of the sedimentary rock record.”    Why, however, would the genus extinction count correlate with the end of the rock section better than the origination count correlate with the beginning?  Aha, the common-cause hypothesis predicted it would.  The answer is in the way evolution works:Under the common-cause hypothesis, however, genera are expected to originate early in a sedimentary basin’s history as new habitats and environments expand and to go extinct abruptly when environmental changes eliminate the basin environments altogether.  Thus, similar average durations for sections and genera as well as corresponding peaks and troughs in rates of origination and extinction are expected.  Interestingly, the common-cause hypothesis also predicts that the genus-section extinction correlation should be stronger than the genus-section origination correlation because genus extinction can match the timing of rapid environmental shifts that result in section truncation, whereas genus origination may not be capable of responding instantly to the macroevolutionary opportunities afforded by basin expansion.  This possibility is sensitive to choice of timescale, but it is supported by analyses that find less empirical support for pulsed genus origination [i.e., punctuated equilibria] than for pulsed genus extinction at the same level of temporal resolution in the Phanerozoic.The remainder of Peters’ discussion delved into the meaning of these correlations for theories of environmental forcing of macroevolution and timing of mass extinctions.  He favored gradualism over saltation for origination of species, and discounted the need for major catastrophes to explain extinction rates.  He defended the challenging concept that “much of the macroevolutionary history of marine animals is driven by processes related to the formation and destruction of sedimentary basins.”  If some evolutionists believe that extinctions and explosions of biological diversity can be forced by a meteorite impact, for instance, why not consider the possibility that macroevolutionary change can also be forced by slower geological changes?  Thus, “it would seem prudent to revisit some of the classic unifying hypotheses that are grounded in the effects of continually operating processes and to reevaluate seriously the extent to which unusual or episodic events are required to explain the macroevolutionary history of marine animals.”    In conclusion, he admitted that more work will need to be done to rule out taxonomic biases.  These “remain a potential obfuscator of macroevolutionary patterns in all global taxonomic databases,” he says; though he has shown some correlation, he is not trying to push his point too far.  “Further quantifying the relationships between the large-scale temporal and spatial structure of the geologic record and the distribution of fossil occurrences within this structure will be important,” he ended, “in overcoming persistent sampling biases and in testing the extent to which common-cause mechanisms have dominated the macroevolutionary history of marine animals.”1Shanan E. Peters, “Geological constraints on the macroevolutionary history of marine animals, “ Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, August 30, 2005, vol. 102, no. 35, 12326-12331, published online before print August 16, 2005, 10.1073/pnas.0502616102.This lengthy entry is exhibited here to show how evolutionists can fool themselves into thinking the observations support Charlie’s tall tale.  In the first place, he used evolutionary assumptions to calibrate evolutionary assumptions: the “common timescale” of both databases is the geologic column, a theoretical arrangement of global sediments built on the assumption of evolution and millions of years.  This is reminiscent of the joke about the church bell ringer who set his watch by the clock tower on the parliament building, only to find out that the clock tower maintenance man set his clock by the church bell.  Second, the correlations are only marginally significant.  His charts show severe outliers.  Sometimes the anomalous data points have an important story to tell.  Third, his use of gap-bound rock sections only concentrates on the beginning and ending of continuously-deposited sediments.  In the old Dr. Seuss book The Cat in the Hat, the first and last pages of the book, showing the children contentedly at ease in a clean living room, belies all the chaos and commotion that occurred in the middle.  Last, Peters trusted in the “if you build it, they will come” theory of evolution.  He didn’t explain how new genera of marine organisms would “emerge” when the sea level rose or fell; he just assumed that whenever organisms are given a safe haven, presto!  macroevolution happens.  In short, the evolutionary story rigged, controlled, operated and guaranteed the outcome of the entire analysis.  Evolution is a self-fulfilling prophecy.    For a side dish, consider what EurekAlert recently reported: most scientific papers are wrong.  Whether from financial interest, prejudice, unseen biases, conflict of interest, peer pressure or the desire to prove relationships that don’t exist (false positives), “There is increasing concern that in modern research, false findings may be the majority or even the vast majority of published research claims.”  Iain Murray, writing for Competitive Enterprise Institute, reflected on what this means – much authoritative-sounding science talk is inconclusive and, frankly, politically or selfishly motivated.  The paper by Peters, reviewed here, fits the description.  For all its graphs and jargon, it is trying to prove something that isn’t necessarily true, built on a bias for a certain brand of Darwinian evolution.    Even if there were a correlation between sediment counts and genus counts, could there be a non-evolutionary explanation?  Naturally.  In a flood scenario, for instance, more genera are likely to be buried in sediments corresponding to the volume of the material.  The first appearance of a genus would either represent the chance placement in the layers or a mechanical artifact of the burial process, such as liquefaction or hydrodynamic sorting.  Extinction would occur, but not origination by evolution.  No great time periods need transpire.  Since Peters’ radar screen was not tuned to this possibility, he missed it.(Visited 29 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Categories
rkudyhunw

Mt. Mazama (GC123H6) – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – February 6, 2013

first_imgA view of Crater Lake and Wizard Island from the Earthcache location. Photo by Geocacher McGeesters.Nearly 7000 years ago, a massive volcano in southern Oregon, United States exploded leaving behind a collapsed caldera. Over the thousands of years that followed, the empty caldera filled with snowmelt and rainwater to form what is now known as Crater Lake. Geocachers from around the world have come to take in the amazing views, learn about this amazing location and find the Mt. Mazama Earthcache (GC123H6).A closer view of Wizard Island. Photo by Geocacher lunarmist02.The explosion that destroyed the stratovolcano is said to have been 42 times more powerful than the Mt. Saint Helens eruption in 1980. In fact, the explosion reduced Mt. Mazama’s original height by about a mile (1.6 km).  Now, Mt. Mazama is more well-known for the result of the explosion: Crater Lake and Wizard Island.“Crater Lake is such a beautiful place. We enjoyed our stay very much and also learned some new aspects about geology. Nature’s forces are really overwhelming. Thanks for the learnings and the cache,” said geocacher netteleut(h)e in a log to earn a smiley for the geocache.At 1,943 feet (592m), Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States, second deepest in North America and ninth deepest in the world. Wizard Island is actually a small cinder cone volcano that was formed by continued volcanic activity after Mt. Mazama’s big eruption.This Earthcache puts you on the rim of Crater Lake, overlooking Wizard Island—but getting there is only one of the requirements for obtaining your smiley. Be sure to read the instructions and correctly answer the questions on the cache page before you log this geocache as “found.”Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedAn Easter (Island) Geocache – Rano Kau – Rapa Nui (GC22ZGB) – Geocache of the WeekMarch 27, 2013In “Community””The Emerald Lakes” GC24VY3 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 4, 2010September 30, 2010In “Community”Epic Adventure, — Wet Surprise (GC1YV80) — Geocache of the Week Video EditionAugust 20, 2014In “Community”last_img read more

Categories
blsonlcct

Drought Forces Tough Choices in the West

first_imgWater trucks for the wealthy“The very rich,” as F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, “are different from you and me,” and that apparently holds true even in a severe drought.As Ann Louise Bardach reports at Politico, California’s wealthiest neighborhoods are managing to stay lush even while most of the state goes dry.In Montecito, an upscale community near Santa Barbara, well-heeled residents like Oprah Winfrey pay to have water brought in on 5,000-gallon tankers. “These days, tankers can be seen barreling down Montecito’s narrow country roads day and night, ferrying up to 5,000 gallons of H20 to some of the world’s richest and thirstiest folks,” Bardach writes.This follows the start of water rationing in February — no new homes, no new swimming pools, and no refilling of existing pools with town water. The town has cut its water consumption by a whopping 48%, but some residents are paying hefty fines for using too much water, and others are bringing in the trucks.There’s one other unconventional solution to lawns that turn brown from a lack of water: hire a painter. As The National Journal reports, business is brisk for lawn painters who apply a coat of paint to make lawns look lush again. The treatment is said to be effective for as long as six months. Old measures still work, but new ideas are being triedWater shortages are affecting the region in many ways. In some areas, drinking water supplies are dangerously low. Farmers are hiring well-drillers to tap new groundwater supplies, prompting alarmed state lawmakers to impose new controls. Air quality is declining in the Los Angeles basin. Water levels in Lake Mead are plummeting, threatening drinking water supplies for Las Vegas and turning marinas into parched prairies.All the conventional water-saving strategies still apply: low-flow shower heads and faucets, hot-water circulation that eliminates the wait for hot water, low-flow or composting toilets, and more efficient appliances. Western communities also are responding by instituting a number of other conservation measures, everything from better water meters to incentives for people who tear out their lawns. Here’s a look at what’s being done. New pricing strategies can lower water useIn the San Francisco Bay Area, an organization known as SPUR (originally the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association) earlier this year listed a number of steps that cut water use, including subsidized home audits, rebates for efficient appliances and plumbing fixtures, landscaping that uses less water, and lawn-removal incentives.Among the programs that SPUR’s report highlighted was tiered water pricing. “The price of water can create a strong incentive to conserve, and pricing water consumption through tiers can be one of the most effective ways to reduce demand,” the report said.In a tiered system, customers pay one rate for an initial amount of water. If they exceed that limit, they pay a higher rate and, depending on the particulars of the system, may run into further rate hikes the more water they use. Tiered rate structures leave decisions of how much water to use in the hands of consumers, but also give them a financial incentive to use less.SPUR said that a similar approach, called water budgeting, assigns a water limit to a household based on such factors as the number of people living in the house or the size of the yard and type of vegetation. If the household goes over its budget, it pays higher rates. Water budgets, however, are complicated, which has limited the number of communities putting them in place.Another policy strategy, SPUR says, is to “decouple” utility sales from overall profits. Under conventional pricing structures, when customers use less water, the utility earns less money, a disincentive to encourage conservation (this is exactly the same situation many electric utilities have found themselves in as more homeowners install photovoltaic (PV) panels on their roofs).With decoupling, however, a private utility is reimbursed for lost revenue if it does not reach sales goals, SPUR says, but must all return excess revenues to its clients if it goes over its goals. This approach, which was first adopted by private California water utilities in 2008, still allows a utility to earn a “modest” profit for investors. Limiting how much water is used for landscapingIn the Coachella Valley, California, region east of Los Angeles, The Desert Sun reports, new housing developments must include drought-tolerant landscaping and irrigation systems that reduce water consumption.Landscaping is a major consumer of water. The Sun reports that overall water use averages 700 gallons per person per day, two thirds of which is used outdoors. Eliminating a single square foot of grass in favor of desert landscaping saves between 50 and 60 gallons of water.KB Home, a Los Angeles-based developer, last year built a house in Lancaster that uses recycled drain water from sinks and showers to water plants outside. The system can save 150,000 gallons of water per year over a more typical home, the newspaper said.As early as 2009, the Coachella Valley Water Efficient Landscape ordinance imposed a number of rules aimed at limiting water use, including guidelines for desert plants, water-saving irrigation systems, and even turf on new golf courses. Officials said the ordinance was 29% more efficient than state rules passed in 2006.A number of cities, including Palm Springs, offer financial assistance to homeowners and homeowner associations to replace grass with drought-tolerant landscaping. In Palm Springs, a total of 52,500 square feet of grass has been removed since 2011, saving roughly 2.9 million gallons of water, The Sun said. Los Angeles has paid homeowners more than $1 million since 2009 to get rid of their lawns, and in Austin, Texas, police are on the lookout for anyone running lawn sprinklers before sunset. The fine is $475.In Las Vegas, where turf replacement programs have been in place for a number of years, the Southern Nevada Water Authority’s Water Smart Landscape Rebate gives customers $1.50 for every square foot of grass that’s replaced with desert landscaping, up to 5,000 square feet per property per year.center_img Better water meters and improved software also helpSPUR’s report details two other approaches that have been used with success in parts of the state. One of them is a device that allows customers to get accurate real-time information on how much water they’re using without expensive plumbing upgrades or meter replacement. The gizmo, called The Barnacle, attaches to an existing water meter. It captures data in 10-second intervals and transmits the data via a cellular network.SPUR said that the device is useful in old buildings where installing new meters would cost too much money. According to the developer, the device has cut water consumption by as much as 26% in pilot studies.A device called Unmeasured-Flow Reducer is designed to measure water flows too small for ordinary meters to detect.Getting better information into the hands of water users is the idea behind software called WaterSmart. Customers get access to reports on consumption as well as recommendations for saving water via a web portal. WaterSmart has been adopted by the East Bay Municipal Utility district and the city of Palo Alto. In California and other parts of the West, a prolonged drought is severely taxing water supplies and prompting state and local governments to push for strict conservation. Water conservation has been a longstanding part of the green-building credo, but until fairly recently was more of an option than a necessity.In February, University of California professor B. Lynn Ingram told The New York Times that the state was on track for having the worst drought in 500 years. Total rainfall in Los Angeles between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2014 was less than 12 inches, the driest such period on record. (Compare that to parts of the East: Portland, Maine, got 6.4 inches of rain in a single day in August, more than fell on Los Angeles in the most recent July-to-June period.)Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in January and urged a drop in water consumption of 20%. The State Water Resources Board set a $500 fine for wasting water.last_img read more

Categories
hvwgwlhlf

UDAN to connect Lakshadweep, Andaman & Nicobar islands with sea planes

first_imgSea plane routes connecting the various islands of Lakshadweep, Andaman and Nicobar as well as Hyderabad’s Prakasam Barrage with Nagarjunasagar in Telangana are among the routes being offered to airlines under the fourth round of UDAN scheme.The Ministry of Civil Aviation invited bids for 134 routes under the low-cost flying scheme, also known as Ude Desh Ka Aam Nagrik (UDAN), on Friday. Interested players can submit their proposals by February 22.Islands of Agatti, Kavaratti, and Mincoy in Lakshadweep have been offered for bidding. Popular islands of Andaman and Nicobar such as Hutbay, Neil, Long Island,Havelock have also been sought to be connected with sea planes under this round of UDAN.On the request of the State government, the Ministry has also invited interest for connecting Prakasam Barrage over Krishna river with Hyderabad as well as Nagarjunasagar dam in Telangana.Last month, the Ministry awarded 235 routes after the successful completion of the third round of bidding for UDAN routes. Players have six months to commence services. These included unserved airports of Andaman and Nicobar at Campbell Bay, Shibpur, Car Nicobar, and six watedromes at Guwahati River Front and Umrangso Reservoir in Assam, Nagarjuna Sagar dam in Telangana, and Shatrunjay Dam and Statue of Unity in Gujarat.Several airports in the northeast region such as Tezpur, Shillong, Passighat and Aizawl have also been offered again for bidding after 56 routes were withdrawn from Air Deccan and Air Odisha because of their failure to provide regular services.Of the 428 routes awarded to airlines under the first two rounds of bidding, 138 have taken off so far.last_img read more

Categories
xuhezldyx

Two militants killed in Shopian encounter

first_imgTwo militants have been killed in a gunfight with security forces in south Kashmir’s Shopian on Friday, police said.In the morning, security forces zeroed in on the militants, triggering the gun battle.Initial reports suggest that the security forces launched the operation in an orchard in Dragad area of the Zainapora belt in Shopian. It followed a tip-off.”The militants opened fire when the security forces zeroed in on them. The operation is on,” said the police.The area has been cordoned and more reinforcements were rushed to the spot.last_img

Categories
qcduycrgp

Hip or knee replacement- after- what to ask your doctor

first_imgDefinitionYou had surgery to get a new hip or knee joint while you were in the hospital.Below are some questions you may want to ask your doctor or nurse to help you take care of your new joint.Alternate NamesWhat to ask your doctor after hip or knee replacement; Hip replacement – after – what to ask your doctor; Knee replacement – after – what to ask your doctor; Hip arthroplasty – after – what to ask your doctor; Knee arthroplasty – after – what to ask your doctorQuestionsHow long will I need to use crutches or a walker after I go home?How much walking can I do?When can I begin to place weight on my new joint? How much?Do I need to be careful about how I sit or move around?What are things that I cannot do?Will I be able to walk without pain? How far?When will I be able to do other activities, such as golf, swimming, tennis, or hiking?Will I have pain medicines when I go home? How should I take them?Will I need to take blood thinners when I go home? How long would it be?How can I get my home ready before I even go to the hospital?How much help will I need when I come home? Will I be able to get out of bedHow can I make my home safer for me?How can I make my home easier to get around?How can I make it easier for myself in the bathroom and shower?What type of supplies will I need when I get home?Do I need to rearrange my home?What should I do if there are steps that go to my bedroom or bathroom?Do I need a hospital bed?What are the signs that something is wrong with my new hip or knee? How can I prevent problems with my new hip or knee?advertisementHow do I take care of my surgical wound?How often should I change the dressing? How do I wash the wound?What should my wound look like? What wound problems do I need to watch out for?When do sutures and staples come out?Can I take a shower? Can I take a bath or soak in the hot tub?When can I go back to see my dentist? Do I need to take any antibiotics before seeing the dentist?Review Date:1/17/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img read more

Categories
cfbobflfx

No winning ticket for Saturday nights 12 million Lotto 649 jackpot

first_imgTORONTO – There was no winning ticket for the $12 million jackpot in Saturday night’s Lotto 649 draw.However, the guaranteed $1 million prize was claimed by a ticket sold in British Columbia.The jackpot for the next Lotto 649 draw on Oct. 11 will be approximately $15 million.last_img