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Softball splits doubleheader with Green Bay

first_imgUW pitcher Leah Vanevenhoven got a win against the UW Green Bay Phoenix in yesterday\’s doubleheader to improve her record to 4-5 on the season.[/media-credit]Although it took seven innings and a 4-0 shutout loss to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in the first game of the doubleheader Wednesday night, the Badgers finally found their offensive spark.In a 9-2 rout of the Phoenix, Wisconsin salvaged what would have been an utter disappointing two-game series. Coming into Wednesday night’s showdown, the Badgers expected to sweep the two games, but Amanda Margelofsky, Green Bay’s ace, had other ideas. In the first game, Margelofsky only conceded four hits and struck out six batters while improving her record to an outstanding 8-2. Although she walked seven Badgers, Wisconsin’s inability to capitalize with runners in scoring position proved to be the difference in the 4-0 score. The Badgers left 10 runners on base including three in the bottom of the second inning. The bases loaded, one out situation, was a golden opportunity for UW’s Jen Krueger, who is 8-15 in the last two series, but unfortunately she was unable to get the timely hit the Badgers so desperately needed.Another example of a squandered opportunity was evident in the fourth when senior Leah Vanevenhoven led off the inning with a solid line drive single to right. Valyncia Raphael laid down a perfect sacrifice bunt, which moved Vanevenhoven to second, but she accidentally rounded the bag too far and was caught off guard when Phoenix second baseman Krissy Hanson tagged her from behind to complete the double play. The story of the first game involved the numerous miscues that plagued the Wisconsin softball team.The first game left head coach Chandelle Schulte dumbfounded.“[I didn’t say] much. You know, honestly, I just said, ‘This is up to you — you’ve got to make some decisions about how you play, and the intensity with which you play,’” Schulte said. “Our energy was just not good; you know it’s up to you [the team].”After some apparent soul searching between games, the Badgers turned their level of play up a notch. Third base, a position that has caused problems for the team all season, finally got plenty of steady production from Karla Powell, who not only held down the hot corner defensively but also contributed an impressive 4-4 performance at the plate.“I was just seeing the ball really well today and was just trying to help the team get something going,” Powell said.The team also received crucial innings from rarely used underclassmen Kristyn Hansen, who more than welcomed the challenge. After a rocky start by pitcher Leah Vanevenhoven, Hansen inherited a 3-2 lead in the third inning and used that opportunity well. She pitched three-plus innings of shutout ball, allowing three hits and striking out four. In the top of the fifth, with the bases loaded for the Phoenix and the game very much still in the balance, Hansen turned the tide by striking out Green Bay’s Katie Cooney, who had already hit a two run homer on a full count changeup.“It was high pressure, some pitches I was uncomfortable throwing, but my coach wanted me to throw them, and I was determined to do well,” Hansen said. “I think after I got the first strikeout I just took a deep breath, and said I’ll get this next one.”The floodgates finally opened in the bottom of the fifth with the Badgers leading 5-2. After another single by Karla Powell, Letty Olivarez smashed her third homer of the year over the 225-foot wall in deep center field. The bomb was a no-doubter which narrowly missed cracking Goodman Diamond’s scoreboard.With the game firmly in hand, the Badgers loaded the bases in the bottom of the sixth for first basemen Alexis Garcia. She came through with a bases clearing double that sealed the deal on the Badger’s first run rule victory 11-2.Although obviously pleased with the resiliency of her ball club, Schulte wasn’t particularly surprised with the offensive outburst her team displayed.“Don’t be too excited,” Schulte said. “That shouldn’t be the exception, that should be the rule.”last_img read more

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Former Syracuse players put skills on display at Major League Lacrosse All-Star Game

first_img Published on June 30, 2012 at 10:27 am Contact Michael: mjcohe02@syr.edu | @Michael_Cohen13 BOCA RATON, Fla. — Leave it to Jovan Miller to put on a show.The former Syracuse midfielder whose flair is affluent and whose personality is infectious seemed destined for the Bud Light Skills Competition at the Major League Lacrosse All-Star Game.So when the crowd wasn’t loud enough prior to his second attempt in the freestyle competition, Miller sprinted down the field with his hand to his ear in an attempt to rally support for “Jovi Nation.”He proceeded to jump over a young female fan, catch a ball in mid air and fire it home past the goaltender. This after an exciting behind-the-back 360 he pulled off in the first round.“I knew I was going to have to do something with my athleticism,” Miller said. “I’m not big on stick tricks and stuff, so I was going to have to be creative.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“As far as the 360, I’ve been practicing a few weeks for that. I’m not going to lie, I was pretty pumped about it.”Miller, who plays for the Charlotte Hounds, was one of five former Syracuse players participating in Saturday’s All-Star Game held at FAU Stadium on the campus of Florida Atlantic University. He was joined by former teammates Stephen Keogh and Joel White on the Young Guns team, while Casey Powell and Steven Brooks played for team Old School.In typical all-star fashion, there was little defense on Saturday with team Old School holding on for an 18-17 win. But that didn’t matter to the crowd of close to 5,000 that was enthralled by a flurry of behind-the-back, between-the-legs and other outrageous shot attempts. And when Brooks scored the game-winning goal with less than two minutes to go, Syracuse had left its imprint firmly on Major League Lacrosse.The SU players put on a clinic at the skills competition held at halftime as well. In addition to Miller participating in the freestyle competition, White, a midfielder who plays for the Rochester Rattlers, took home the title in the obstacle course and Brooks finished second in the speed-shooting challenge.Miller ultimately fell just short to Hamilton Nationals goalie Brett Queener, who tossed his stick in the air and kicked the ball into the net after a series of fancy fakes and dance moves. Yes, dance moves.White navigated the obstacle course with ease, showing off the foot speed that made him a college All-American to cruise to a victory in 14.62 seconds.“This opportunity is just great,” White said. “It’s something you will cherish being out here with all this talent.”And to show that the old guys still have it, Brooks, a midfielder for the Chesapeake Bayhawks who graduated from SU in 2008, clocked in at 105 miles per hour on his two attempts in the speed-shooting event. He finished second to Kyle Hartzell, 6-foot-2 defender, who tied the MLL record with a 111 mile-per-hour rocket.As for the game itself, the oldest SU alum was arguably the most impressive. Powell, who graduated from Syracuse in 1998 and is the all-time leading scorer in MLL history, scored two goals and had one assist.His second goal of the game came off a beautiful maneuver that began behind the goal. He darted out in front of the crease and scored high on the near post after a low fake.“He’s unbelievable, man, I’ll tell you what,” White said. “It’s an honor to be on the field with him.”Miller, who treated the game as a glorified freestyle competition anyway, impressed the fans with his creative dunk-like attempt in the first quarter. He took a running start and leapt audaciously from behind the goal, attempting to go over the top and slam the ball into the net.Though the attempt went awry, he couldn’t help but smile. Miller has always been an entertainer, and Saturday’s All-Star game was the perfect setting.“It’s an All-Star game, so I get to play around for a bit,” Miller said. “I absolutely loved it. It was everything I thought it would be.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Keita misses practice with sprained right knee, still listed as day-to-day

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 10, 2014 at 5:24 pm Contact Stephen: sebail01@syr.edu | @Stephen_Bailey1 Baye Moussa Keita did not participate in Syracuse’s practice Monday due to the sprained right knee he suffered against Clemson on Sunday, SU Athletics spokesman Pete Moore confirmed in a text message.Moore said Keita received treatment on his knee and is still listed as day-to-day heading into the top-ranked Orange’s matchup with No. 25 Pittsburgh on Wednesday night.He suffered the injury coming down “funny” on his right leg after fouling Tigers freshman forward Jaron Blossomgame late in the first half, Moore said. Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim declined to provide a further update during the Atlantic Coast Conference’s coaches’ teleconference Monday.Sophomore forward Jerami Grant filled in for Keita against Clemson, playing 8:40 at center in the second half while Rakeem Christmas sat on the bench with four fouls.Boeheim said on Monday that Grant would practice with the centers this week.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

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Pitching wasn’t the easiest path, but it led Alexa Romero to becoming Syracuse’s ace

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Editor’s note: Prepare yourselves for the spring seasons of Syracuse Athletics with our 2018 season preview series, which will spotlight senior runner Danielle Delgado, next-in-line hurdler David Gilstrap, former freshman tennis standout Miranda Ramirez and Syracuse softball’s sophomore ace, Alexa Romero.Alexa Romero was at a karate tournament. It was one of the sports Romero’s parents signed her up for in elementary school in an attempt to combat her shyness. She was at the tournament while both her parents were at work.She was alone and felt stranded. She didn’t want to be there. She called her mom to pick her up.“Later that day, my mom was like ‘If you don’t choose a sport, I’m going to choose one for you,’” Romero said.Her younger brother was playing T-Ball at the time and it looked more appealing to Romero than ballet classes. Her parents bought her a glove and signed her up for softball.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMore than 10 years later, in her first season at SU, Romero went 12-7. She struck out 155 batters, including a career-high 12 against Pittsburgh in mid-April. Now, a sophomore at Syracuse, Romero enters the season as SU’s ace.“As the season went on she got stronger and stronger,” SU head coach Mike Bosch said of Romero’s freshman campaign.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorRomero grew up in Aurora, Colorado less than a half hour outside Denver. With travel teams few and far between, Romero’s family formed their own team.Most of the travel teams in Colorado at the time were far away from the Denver area and the one team in the area had a coach who wasn’t what the Romero family wanted for their daughter’s softball coach.They were also tired of playing the same few teams over and over again. To solve their problem, Romero’s father, Larry, and one of his friends took charge.“My husband and his best friend both had grown up playing baseball,” Romero’s mother, Andrea Romero, said, “and they kind of went into it like ‘Hey, yeah, we can easily coach girls’ softball.’ It didn’t take long for them to realize it was very different.”The coaches were in place and members of the local recreation teams joined up. The Colorado Magic travel team was created. In their first season, they only won once and Romero wasn’t at that game.By 2008, two years later, they were competing for the travel state title in her age group.In the final inning of the state championship game, the score was tied with two outs. A runner stood on second and Romero was up to bat. She made contact with the ball, sending it between the legs of the first baseman before it eventually rolled under the fence for a ground-rule double.“I got the MVP award,” Romero said. “I still have it. It’s in this little glass thing, it was really cool. It was amazing to me because we won states.”Under her dad’s tutelage, she didn’t just build her softball skills, but more importantly found her place as a pitcher.After her first year playing softball, Romero approached her parents. She wanted to pitch. Her parents said absolutely not, citing the time and difficulty as factors behind not becoming a pitcher. But with few positions for a left-handed softball player, Romero eventually convinced her parents to let her try it.“She wanted to do it. In elementary school, it was fun,” Andrea said. “Everybody that young, they want to pitch, they want to catch. They all want to try and do different things. And then when (Romero) got to middle school, it started to become more serious.”It was in middle school that Romero started to second guess her choice. The competition became harder and most of the pitchers on the travel team traded the circle for other parts of the field.For a few months, Romero took a break from pitching, her mother said. She used to cry every time she pitched. Romero said her friends were good at it without trying even as she had to try hard.“You’re either all in or you’re all out,” Andrea said. “I would say out of all her friends that were pitchers, probably 95 percent quit at that age.”Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorShe only took a few months’ hiatus from pitching, though, and when she returned, it took her a while to fully enjoy the position. It wasn’t until her sophomore year of high school that Romero broke out as a pitcher. Her dad hung up his head coaching hat and Joe Bruley, one of the coaches of the Eaglecrest (Colorado) High School Raptors, took over in helping Romero grow as a pitcher.“Sophomore year is when I got really good at (pitching),” Romero said. “I fell in love with it. It’s so bad for me to say but I love being the center, being in the middle. I love having control of the game. I love having the ball, I’ve become a ball hog.“I love having the ball.”Romero knew she wanted to play softball in college when she was 8 years old. By the time she was in high school, her parents pushed her into attending recruiting camps as a way to get exposure. Romero wore a bright pink shirt at each camp to stand out.When the offers rolled in, Syracuse was the highest-caliber team to reach out. After she came to campus and walked into the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center, she knew it was the place she wanted to be.On Feb. 10, 2017, Romero stepped into the circle while donning a Syracuse jersey for the first time. Facing then-No. 10 Georgia, Romero pitched six innings, tallying three strikeouts while allowing 11 hits and six runs. Her parents watched from the stands, crying. They didn’t expect her to be pitching so early in her college career.“We threw her right into the mix and started her against Georgia our first weekend out,” Bosch said. “A lot of freshmen would probably be a little nervous and she probably was a little bit nervous doing that too. I think she grew a lot that weekend, she got some experience that really helped her through the ACC season.”Despite living in Colorado, Romero’s parents plan on following the team on the road this season. They’re renting an RV and planning on attending numerous road games, usually played in warmer weather than Syracuse and less likely to be canceled.Back in middle school, Romero took a break from pitching. In high school, she finally broke through and found her college of the future. In her sophomore year at Syracuse, her parents will get plenty of opportunity to see her shine in the circle.“(Romero’s) a hard-worker. She wanted to be successful more than she was successful,” Andrea said. “So she put a lot of hard work, a lot of sweat and tears into it. I feel like a lot of kids are born talented athletes but she created that in herself.” Comments Published on January 28, 2018 at 9:33 pm Contact Kaci: klwasile@syr.edulast_img read more

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Syracuse’s freshmen aren’t playing like freshmen

first_img Comments Lined up in the slot to Eric Dungey’s left, freshman receiver Taj Harris burst out of his stance and down the field, streaking past Clemson safety Nolan Turner in coverage.Dungey saw the wideout dart open and flung the ball to Harris, who ran under it, making a bobbling catch for 51 yards on third down to set up Syracuse’s first touchdown against then-No. 3 Clemson.“I was running, running, running, running,” Harris said of the play postgame, “and I put my hands out and just waited for it to hit my hands.”Harris’ catch is just one highlight play from Syracuse’s (4-1, 1-1 Atlantic Coast) freshman class. Safety Andre Cisco, cornerback Trill Williams, running back Jarveon Howard, Harris and a handful of other freshmen have all made steady contributions, large and small, early in their SU careers, bolstering a roster that in years past lacked depth.“We’re trying to be a different class here,” Williams said. “Bring a different dynamic to the team.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut before the group stepped on campus, head coach Dino Babers acknowledged the difficulties of playing college football as a true freshman during his National Signing Day press conference. He referred to the 2018 recruiting class as a “break” class, meaning the players could take a break from playing football regularly to learn and develop.Harris remembered asking Babers about the opportunity to play early. Babers, as Harris recalls, said that if he was serious about contributing right away, he needed to study the playbook and refine his craft as much, and as soon, as possible.The gap started closing as soon as most of the freshmen stepped on campus at the beginning of summer. Before official conditioning workouts began, Williams, Harris and Howard, along with a handful of others — all freshman, sophomore or transfer skill position players and quarterbacks  — gathered on South Campus to practice.A common drill pitted wide receivers and defensive backs in one-on-ones. Harris particularly remembered lining up against Williams and experiencing the 6-foot-2, 202-pound defensive back’s jam at the line of scrimmage. Harris learned it’s part of Williams’ trademark physicality.“He’s gonna lay the boom on a lot of people,” Harris said. “He’s jamming cats up at the line, chest work.”The freshmen entered their first fall camp at SU, where they started making an impression. Williams, said junior cornerback Chris Fredrick, led all players in camp interceptions. Harris developed a connection with Dungey. Cisco, who enrolled early and practiced in the spring, was the starting free safety during fall camp.”This is the most ready I’ve seen freshmen come in,” senior wide receiver Jamal Custis said on Aug. 16.Laura Angle | Digital Design EditorIn the season opener against Western Michigan 15 days later, Cisco recorded an interception — his first of a college football-leading four — less than five minutes into the game. He snagged two more against Wagner and another against UConn.While Cisco’s ballhawking has been a boost to a team striving for turnovers, other parts of his game, particularly deep ball coverage and run fits, have come along slower. The freshman got burned badly against the Broncos and is prone to taking bad angles against the run. Cisco has recognized the issue, though, due to the difference in speed from high school to college. In response he’s played deeper from the line of scrimmage to accommodate.Williams’ arc of progression has been longer, playing in spurts at cornerback or nickel throughout Syracuse’s first five games. Cisco benefitted in part from a thin safety depth chart. Williams hasn’t had that luxury, stuck behind Scoop Bradshaw, Chris Fredrick and Antwan Cordy at cornerback and nickel back, respectively. Published on October 3, 2018 at 10:46 pm Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham Even in limited reps, Williams has been consistent in coverage and sturdy against the run while making occasional splash plays.Against Clemson, Williams picked off Tigers quarterback Chase Brice for his first career interception. Before the drive, on the sideline, Williams remembered teammates saying he was due for an interception. When Brice badly overthrew an out route to his right, Williams pounced.“What a coincidence,” Williams said.Aside from the defensive back duo, Howard, a big-bodied running back from Mississippi has arrived as Syracuse’s power run option. Against Florida State, Howard took a shotgun handoff from Tommy DeVito and followed left tackle Cody Conway. With a defender closing the edge, Howard hit a cut inside and rumbled inside the five before getting chased down from behind.So far, the freshman has toted the football 24 times for 187 yards and hasn’t scored.And there’s Harris, who caught his first touchdown against Wagner on a 24-yard crossing route. But the freshman wide receiver from Beverly, New Jersey, had his best performance to date against the Tigers, notching career highs in catches (three) and yards (66).Harris, just like the other freshmen, is trying to use each rep to prove he deserves the next.“You’ve got to earn it,” Harris said. “And if you earn it, you get a shot.” Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Scudetto Odds on the Rossoneri rapidly receding

first_img Flutter moves to refine merger benefits against 2020 trading realities August 27, 2020 Share StumbleUpon Share ‘Deal maker’ Rafi Ashkenazi ends Flutter tenure  August 27, 2020 Related Articles Submit CT Gaming bolsters Italian profile with The Betting Coach  August 27, 2020 After a £160 million pound overhaul of their squad, the odds on seven time European champions, AC Milan winning next season’s Scudetto have been slashed. At the culmination of last season, the Rossoneri were a massive 16/1 to end Juventus’ reign of domination in Italy. However, their lavish summer of spending means that their price has been shortened to just 6/1. With the help of their new Chinese ownership, Milan have acquired a wealth of talent from all over Europe; Franck Kessié, Ricardo Rodriguez, André Silva, Hakan Calhanoglu, Andrea Conti and Lucas Biglia are just some of the players that make up their list of new signings. Nonetheless, their biggest coup is undoubtedly capturing highly regarded defender, Leonardo Bonucci from Italian champions Juventus. Selling one of their most sought after defenders to Milan, suggests that Juventus resonate with the bookmakers, who despite shortening the price of Milan, continue to rank them as outsiders for the title.The Rossoneri are currently third favourites for the Serie A glory, with Juventus odds on to win an unprecedented seventh consecutive Scudetto and Napoli 5/1 outsiders for their first title since the Maradona era.Alan Alger, BetwayAlan Alger of Betway spoke to SBC about Milan’s chances this season: “They have shortened up from 16/1 at the start of June to their current price (6/1). I would say most of these signings come under the promising category rather than the proven one in terms of Championship winners or challengers.“They’ve finished on average over 30 points behind Juventus the last 3 seasons so have enormous ground to make up on them and also have to participate in the Europa League.”The Italian football season begins on 20 August, AC Milan travel to Crotone on the opening weekend.last_img read more

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Ascot and Chester due to host races from The Silk Series

first_img ARC continues financial support for greyhound trainers during COVID-19 shutdown April 15, 2020 ITV secures three-year British racing broadcast deal August 5, 2020 Ascot and Chester racecourses have agreed to host races from the third series of The Silk Series in 2019, with the first race taking place at Ascot Racecourse this Saturday.The £150,000 series of races for female jockeys aims to promote the achievements of both amateur and professional female jockeys across Britain. Jockeys take part in a series of fifteen races across summer to compete for points. The races will take place at nine ARC racecourses, including Goodwood, Hamilton Park, Musselburgh and York Racecourses alongside Chester and Ascot.ARC’s Group Director of Partnerships, David Leyden Dunbar said, “It was fantastic to collaborate with our partner racecourses outside of our group in 2018 and this year’s further expansion of The Silk Series represents a real opportunity for the racing community to work in partnership to celebrate the achievements of female jockeys”.The races are set to be supported by official betting partner, bet365, with Sky Sports Racing presenter Hayley Moore set to offer race insights and tips ahead of each stage of the competition. Moore will also be offered a £100 charity bet for each race from bet365, with all of the proceeds to be donated to Cancer Research UK.The Silk Series will be continuing its support of Cancer Research UK in the third edition of the competition, having previously raised in excess of £52,000 last year. The Final will take place at Doncaster Racecourse on Thursday 12 September where the overall Champion will receive the Tufnell Trophy.  The trophy is named in honour of Meriel Tufnell, the first woman to ride a winner under rules in Britain when winning the Goya Stakes at Kempton Park in 1972. Submit Related Articles Share StumbleUpon Share Sportech highlights new client wins under lockdown June 26, 2020last_img read more

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Sumner Newscow forum: The Wellington City Council race (part 2)

first_imgYunker — Water rationing is an option. Placing lawn watering restrictions on those that use city water to operate their sprinkler systems is a small step but we would need to consider other options.Fatema YunkerPlacing a ban on companies wanting to use water for oil fracking is a must. We can’t afford to consume water in an irresponsible way. Before we moved into town we owned land off of Dalton road. The company performing the work on this road appeared to be using water from Deer Creek. This is something I am strongly against. Woodrow — The way I see it, we can drill new wells, buy it from other sources, limit water use or do a rain dance, the success or failure of which, according to Will Rogers, depends on timing.Kim WoodrowI see no problem using ‘gray water’  in fracking, but I don’t think we should sell them potable water. Gretchen MooreMoore — We as citizens should be concerned with the water shortage and should conserve water at every opportunity that we can.  Maybe not water our lawns everyday but maybe on a schedule.  No, I don’t believe we should use our water supply for oil fracking. Green — Bringing big business, or industry, to town is a game of incentives.  It’s very competitive between potential cities and states.It’s very hard for us to compete.  I feel we need to keep trying, but also focus our attention on bringing smaller, mom and pop businesses to town.  We have relied far too long on the standard methods of promoting our city and we’re not seeing the positive results that I know are obtainable.City hall needs to recognize that we are the best advocates for our city and market ourselves accordingly.  Wellington has a fabulous downtown area, we have fantastic turnpike access and most of all this town is filled with a large number of small businesses owners who could provide great insight into the issue.  As mayor I will definitely involve these untapped resources!  During my time on the city council I have fully supported alternate ways to grow our community and economy and will continue to do so.Hatfield — Showing the businesses that our community is expanding and advancing with the times. That we’re not afraid of change and being open to them.Moore — To have more business into come our city is to utilize the I-35 corridor with signs to show what Wellington has to offer in terms of business.  An option is to offer some incentives to the new business whether that is tax incentives (reduction in taxes – possibly).  There are several buildings downtown that are remodeled and sitting empty maybe offer the building owner some incentives to have the rent at a lower rate to bring business into downtown.  Offering utilities at a reduced rate could be another option.Palmer — In appropriate situations, I believe that incentives and tax breaks are appropriate. More importantly though, there needs to be a consistency in the leadership of our community in its communication to businesses seeking expansion in small town America. We have excellent, trained workers. We have a commitment to traditional family values. We are committed to the success of our community and likewise we will be loyal to those businesses that give us that chance.Sears — To attract business to the city, Welling should do what bigger cities do.  Give tax and utility breaks for a specific amount of time.Valentine — Word of mouth to people in other towns when you visit there. Play your city up for what it has to offer not what it does not have to offer. Be positive.Woodrow — See my answer on number 3 which states: “From what I’ve been told, it has, in the past, been difficult to open a new business in Wellington. If we are to become prosperous again, we will have to entice new businesses and make it inviting for them to come here by offering incentives. Perhaps in the form of temporary tax and utility breaks,  and/or reduced land fees. I know this may seem less than agreeable, but in the long run, I think Wellington will come out ahead.Another possibility would be to ask the people who have built successful businesses in Wellington, perhaps form a committee to explore new ideas.”Yunker — One area is the people and the values implicit to the community as a whole. In today’s world businesses look for tax breaks but it goes beyond that factor. Wellington has a high percentage of single parent families with young children below the poverty line and we continue to allow low-income housing to be built. Do not misunderstand my statement, I believe a community should take care of those that need assistance.My family needed the aid of low-income housing when I was a child but continuing to build low-income housing and not have a diverse job market is not helping those that need help and it does nothing for the City of Wellington to appeal to outside companies to set up shop in our community. Jerry SearsSears — If the City is going to grow and sustain itself, we will need a sustainable supply of water.  Drilling more wells might be the answer.  Do not allow water use for oil fracking when water is in short supply. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (16) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 280 weeks ago It’s sad that the two running for mayor AND council, copy and pasted their responses to the questions that were also asked of them in the “mayor forum”. Maybe if one of them wins both mayor and council, they can have both seats, since their answers are the same for each position. Report Reply 8 replies · active 279 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down Guest · 279 weeks ago Yesterday there was a comment about a city council candidate who filed bankruptcy and was charged with insurance fraud…Then the comment was removed. Why? It’s true. Report Reply 3 replies · active 279 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down WellCitizen · 279 weeks ago If you google ‘Kip Etter Arizona’ you will find his bankruptcy filing. Would that be the documentation you require, Tracy? Also, I’ve heard that Tracy has obtained the attendance records for the City Council men/women. Tracy, please post the attendance records so that the voting public can be informed. Report Reply 1 reply · active 279 weeks ago -3 Vote up Vote down Larry · 279 weeks ago So those on the city council now and in the past that have never had a bankruptcy filing have spent the tax payers money wisely and never made a mistake. I would think we should get more information first before making a judgment. Good thing Donald Trump isn’t running for the council. Report Reply 0 replies · active 279 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Mark HatfieldHatfield — Lawn watering restrictions. Maybe even a update to the current reservoir to fix the tributary feeding it. And yes depending on the water situation fracking could be a viable solution for this towns financial needs. Part 2 of two-part seriesby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following is second part of the Sumner Newscow Candidates Forum for the Wellington City Council. This will be for questions five through eight. The first four questions are featured here.  Candidates who are running for both mayor and city council will be have duplicate answers for both races.The candidates running for council include: Cindy Antonich, Kevin Dodds, Kip Etter, Kelly Green, Mark Hatfield, Gretchen Moore, Stanton Palmer, John Alan Saunders, Jerry Sears, Jim Valentine, Kim Woodrow, and Fatema Yunker.Three of the 12 candidates will win a city council seat.The forum answers provided below will be presented in alphabetical order of the candidates last name. We did not receive answers from candidate Saunders.Remember the city election is April 7, next Tuesday. Forums for the Wellington school board and the Wellington City Mayor race can be found elsewhere as well.5. Because of the recent drought, water has become an issue for the city of Wellington and across south-central Kansas. Outside mother nature, what should the city do to make sure there is ample water for its citizens in the next 10 years? Do you believe the city of Wellington should allow water for oil fracking? Cindy AntonichAntonich — Water is certainly a big concern for our quality of life. I don’t agree with the premise that raising the water rates is a solution for the lack of water in Wellington. Researching grey water for certain things is a viable option. Education on grey water usage, zero scaping, and what we can all do to save as much water as possible could prove beneficial to everyone. Even wells draw from the water table. This is without a doubt a problem that will take time and education.As far as allowing water to go for fracking, I am very much against that. Bad idea all the way around.Kevin DoddsDodds —  Because of the recent drought, water has become an issue for the city of Wellington and across south-central Kansas. Outside mother nature, what should the city do to make sure there is ample water for its citizens in the next 10 years? Do you believe the city of Wellington should allow water for oil fracking?Much in the way the council members should be diligent stewards of the community’s tax dollars, I believe that they should also be diligent stewards of our natural resources. I do not believe that potable water or water that is suitable for irrigation should be used for fracking. It seems to me that it would be counterproductive to our community to do so.Kip EtterEtter — Drought and water issues in Kansas.  I wish someone had a magic wand and could fix it, however that is not the case. We cannot just stick our heads in the sand, it will not go away and it will become a larger more complicated issue that our children will have to deal with.  The current drought, ample, viable, clean water supplies for Wellington, oil fracking and how they all interact with one another are all subjects that I would need more information on.  I feel it would be best handled on a case by case basis, with input from not only industry professionals, The City’s staff, experts in the field(s) and also the public.  We are after all talking about one of the most vital necessities to our very existence.  This is a very important subject that cannot be taken lightly.Kelly GreenGreen — In 2014, I led the city council in forming a water conservation committee to address Wellington’s water issues.  Phase One is a rebate and product program that helps residents purchase or receive products to reduce their water consumption.  Phase Two is a program to provide educational materials to our elementary children.These things are great… but only a small part of what we need to do as a city to insure a healthy, abundant water supply.  We need an aggressive water line replacement program, we need to maintain our lakes and wells, and we also need to brainstorm ideas for gray water usage.  We need to study ways to hold and preserve water run-off from heavy rains.  Data shows that the annual frequency for heavy rains is increasing, even though our total amount of annual rainfall is not.  The same way a citizen uses a rain barrel, the city should study methods of collecting this run-off.In 2012 the amount of water used for fracking in Kansas equaled less than 1 percent of the total water used.  This is a very small amount, but we must also consider that the water used is not reusable.It’s too dirty to be used for anything other than drilling.  I’m not ready to say we should ban the sale of water to the oil companies but I believe our policy needs to continually adjust to reflect the changes in our current state of water in Wellington.  I have attended the Governor’s Conference on the Future of Water in Kansas the past two years and will continue to be informed on water issues affecting not only us, but our state. 8. Can you tell voters why they should elect you as the mayor or a city council member of Wellington? Antonich — I care about the quality of life for the taxpayers and citizens of Wellington. I have been a city council member before and have a strong voice for the people. I am not afraid to ask tough questions. There is one, and only one thing to remember. The city council members work for the people. You can tell them no.Dodds — I believe that the people of Wellington should elect me to the city council if they want someone who is dedicated to making informed decisions. By that, I mean that I am not a “go along to get along” kind of person. I will investigate all sides of every issue before I commit myself to taking a position. I will listen to the citizens of our community and do my best to act upon their concerns.I will strive to be their representative on the council. I would appreciate the opportunity to sit on the city council and I will give my solemn word that I will do everything in my power to keep our city moving forward into the future, diligently looking for opportunities for our city to grow and become more prosperous.Etter — I feel that I bring a unique prospective to the table, Wellington is my home.  It’s where my wife and I chose to “plant our roots” and raise our children.  However, I did leave and was gone from Wellington almost 15 years before returning home.  During that time I was exposed to numerous cultures, experiences and ideas that allowed me to broaden my perspective and see the way things are done in other countries, states, cities and communities.Wellington is what it is today because of the people that live here and choose to call it home just as my wife and I do.  I’m not asking for your vote so I can completely change the face of Wellington.  I’m asking for your vote so I can help build upon the history of our great hometown.  Just as my wife and I did as well as four generations of my family before me did, I want Wellington to be the place that my children and grandchildren choose to call home or come back home to raise their children.There is nothing that any of us can do about the past; no matter how hard we try it cannot be changed. We can only learn from it amd make lemonade out of the lemons that we have occasionally been dealt.I am asking for your vote.  However, I am going to ask more than that from you.  I ask that if you’re not registered to vote, please do so and that if you are, please take the time to cast your vote regardless of the candidate.  There are an unimaginable amount of souls that paid the ultimate price.  Families that have suffered the losses of their loved ones.  There are countless other brave young men and women that are currently putting or have laid their lives on the line, with their services to our great country giving us this opportunity and right.  Your voice does count! GOD BLESS AMERICA!Green — Because I can provide the type of new leadership our community needs to thrive.  I am a hands-on person, I won’t be just another smiling face nor am I looking for self-promotion.I have proven that I will work hard for the city of Wellington and not delegate the difficult or time-consuming tasks to others.  Furthermore, I’m not looking to use the position of mayor as a stepping stone to a political career or to pad my resume.I’m in this race because I can be in the game every day, focused and dedicated toward creating solutions that better our lives… that better our community.  Wellington is in a situation where we need to realize we can’t continue along the same path and expect different results.  A different path is right before us, great changes are happening, good things are coming.  Let’s take that path!  I’d appreciate your vote on April 7.Hatfield — Me and my wife are business owners of the largest vaper shop in the state. and have done it all with a strong desire to help people stop using regular tobacco products. And if elected I will work just as hard to make this a even greater place to live in. And a community we can all be proud of.Moore — If I get elected for city council I will listen to the public with their concerns and take all aspects into account for the best interest of the citizens and the city.  The city needs to be run as a business and should consider all possibilities of running in the black and not in the red.Palmer — A vote for Stanton Palmer is a vote for a progressive leader who respects the traditions of Wellington. A vote for Stanton Palmer is a vote for a hard working father, loving grandfather and committed husband. With all of these roles I have in life — I want the best for my family and the best for my community. A vote for me is a vote for a concerned citizen stepping up for all of the families and individuals in our great community.Sears — Voters should elect me to City Council because I have no personal agenda.  I want to hear what the citizens of Wellington want and do my best to make that happen.Valentine — Don’t vote for me if you think this is a popularity contest.Vote for me because you know, not think, I can do the best job of representing all of us. You are important to me, everyone of you. What you want is what I want – a better life. A more constructive life for all of us.Woodrow — I believe I can be an asset to this city. As in the first question, I stated that I was an industrial engineer, the true definition of industrial engineer is someone who fixes things that are broken. I believe that I can be instrumental in fixing the problems of this city.Yunker — I feel the structure and my answers to two of the above questions cover this question. Simply put; it is time for a change.Follow us on Twitter.center_img Antonich — I will go back to the downtown revitalization idea. The City needs to work with people to create a healthy attitude about starting a business in Wellington. When a person wants to start a business in Wellington, the City Council should be ready to direct the City Manager to assess the problems a person will encounter in starting a business, and work with, not against, a possible new business owner. Valentine — We need to try and conserve a little more. Trust in God it will rain when it is ready and not one minute before.As far as the issue of water versus fracking: well you can drink water, but you can’t drink oil.Jim Valentine Dodds — As I stated in an earlier question, Wellington needs to become more competitive with other cities when it comes to offering incentives to businesses that are interested in our community.As a city, we need to team up with the chamber of commerce and find ways to promote our city in such a manner that it will spark interest with entrepreneurs who may be looking for somewhere to expand their business or open a new business. We need to actively seek opportunities and not sit back and hope that opportunities present themselves. Etter — Attracting Businesses to Wellington… this is something that is so very important to Wellington.  As I stated in question #3, we must not overlook or forget about our current businesses as we look ahead trying to attract new employers to our City.  I believe that diversification is something that we need to strive for in Wellington.  We have a heavy aircraft and agriculture influence, so we need to look at other things that can build upon those current strengths while also adding diversity.We have a great highly skilled workforce but have many facilities that are sitting empty or are currently operating at less than optimal capacity or production.  Couple that with 2 railroad lines that pass through Wellington (one with a terminal), two U.S. highways, I-35, The Kansas Star Casino located within 15 miles, an airport that has a runway that has been lengthened , a new police and fire station, a great aquatics center, superior golf course, a new recreation center that’s in its finishing stages, the newly renovated Memorial Auditorium, Worden Park, along with a school district that just recently passed a bond to help with some much needed renovations and repairs to its facilities.I see Wellington as a prime location for small to medium sized businesses that are looking to relocate or start up a new operation.  However, Wellington is not going to just pop up on a Google search when these entrepreneurs and/or business executives are looking for a location.  We must set up a strategic plan to recruit these businesses to Wellington; possibly a committee of individuals from not only the City Council, but also including the Wellington Area Chamber of Commerce, the Sumner County Commissioners, representation from USD 353, as well as others passionate about the growth of our community. 7. Do you feel our utility rates are too high or are they in line with other communities? Antonich — They are too high. We don’t have the tax base of other communities.Dodds — As a resident, I am always of the mind that our utilities are too high. However, I am not looking to relocate due our utility rates. Since Wellington has become part of an electric cooperative, I am curious to know if there is a recurring study to determine if this is still a less expensive option for our electrical service as opposed to generating our own electricity. These are the type of questions that I will be asking if I am elected to the city council. I will always look for ways for the citizens of Wellington to save money.Etter — Utility Rates in Wellington… utility Rates are high in Wellington and that it is something that needs to be looked at.  On the surface this question seems very straight forward and basic, but it is not.  Why are they at the current rate they are?  What are the customers getting for those rates? Can the current rates be lowered? Are there areas where the city could become more efficient, thus allowing for a rate reduction?Would we as an entire community be in a better position overall to consider having an outside entity takeover our current electrical department and/or sanitation department? What is the current status of our infrastructure?  These are just a few of the questions that must be considered & researched before it can be answered.    Often times elected officials are privy to information in which the public is not.  Those elected officials must make tough decisions with input from the citizens but also with knowledge of said information.  I don’t feel that myself or anyone else can or should answer this question without all of the information available.In my opinion, to do so would be a disservice to the community.  That being said, I do believe that lower utility rates is an area we can focus on and that would be a positive change, ultimately making Wellington a more attractive community for families & business looking for a new home in addition to those of us currently living here.Green — I’d love to tell you that our utility bills are out of line, but the data provided to me shows that Wellington is comparable to other towns.  What I can tell you is this:  I will not approve any rate increase unless I am 100 percent convinced it is warranted.  I am not against raising rates, but I am against raising rates to cover for poor budgeting skills.  Rate increases should be the final option, not an easy solution.Hatfield — They are in line with a few other communities I have researched.Moore — Utility rates in themselves are not high the part that makes the utilities high is the energy cost charges.  That is where the utilities are high.  As far as what makes up the “energy cost” we as citizens do not know and maybe offer an explanation as to why, maybe this would help to explain why the electric is so high.  If you look on your bill you will see where you get charge for the electric service cost which is a decent amount then right below that is the Energy cost and a lot of the time it is about double the electric service cost.  So it appears to be a double charge for energy.   An option to look into is wind energy for the city.Palmer — Yes I do. The city utilities continue to increase without justification, other than the city needs to make up for shortfalls in other areas. A person doesn’t get a raise simply because they need more money – it must be justified – improvement of services, changes in services, increases in efficiencies that will project a savings in the future. None of the present  increases have been justified to the community.Sears — Are our utilities too high compared to other communities?  I honestly can’t answer that because I have not compared the rates.  If elected I will listen to the opinions of the people I serve on that account.Valentine — I get really tied of comparing us to other cities. I find that as an excuse not an answer. Yes, I feel they are too high and I am trying to get to the bottom of the problem.Someone has forgot the word transparency. What’s this about a rebate? Minds have slipped or closed. I will bring this up at a forum.Woodrow — I seem to remember seeing  a chart showing that we were in the upper end of the scale, but that was a while ago and I don’t know where we are now.Yunker — If you look at the national averages by state, Kansas is slightly higher for the West North Central area. I feel Wellington’s utilities are in line for the most part with other communities. I can accept our cost for utilities (KS averaged at 12.13 cents per Kilowatts-hour) when you compare other states like Connecticut that is at 19.59 cents per Kilowatt-hour or Hawaii at 37.34 cents per Kilowatt-hour. 6. What is the best route to attracting business to the city of Wellington?  Palmer — The availability of drinking water has become a major problem for many cities across the country. Wellington is no different.I do not believe that anyone knows the one solution that will work.Stanton PalmerHowever, exploring the drilling of new water wells, educating citizens on water conservation and creative ways to recycle water, as well as, modernizing fixtures are several immediate ways the water issue can be improved. I do not believe it is appropriate to allow oil fracking to utilize city water without regulation or accountability.last_img read more

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Career in limbo, Steelers LB Shazier helping in other ways

first_imgPITTSBURGH (AP) — At least one portion of Ryan Shazier’s daily routine hasn’t changed much from the previous time the Pittsburgh Steelers were preparing to face Cincinnati, even if the rest of the injured linebacker’s life is hardly the same. Shazier still makes his way to the club’s practice facility around 7 a.m. most days. Any teammate willing to drop by Shazier’s usual spot can feel free to pull out a notebook and start jotting Shazier’s thoughts while he serves as both peer and professor.“He’s just trying to find little nitpick things,” Pittsburgh rookie safety Terrell Edmunds said.It is Shazier’s way of staying connected to the game even as he continues his long and inspiring recovery from that frightening moment last December when the Pro Bowler lowered his helmet to hit Bengals wide receiver Josh Malone late in the first quarter, a play that ended with Shazier clutching his lower back in agony while players knelt around him in prayer and Paul Brown Stadium feel eerily silent.Ten months later, the sight of Shazier being taken off the field on a stretcher before being placed in an ambulance remains fresh as the Steelers (2-2-1) brace themselves for their annual visit to Cincinnati (4-1) on Sunday.“It was just a really weird feeling after that happened,” Pittsburgh linebacker L.J. Fort said. “You’d make a good play but nobody was really jumping around or was excited or anything like that, so it was really sobering moment and brought to the forefront that football is not the most important thing in life.”Playing amid a mixture of fear for their friend and uncertainty over Shazier’s status, the Steelers rallied for a 23-20 victory .Asked how they managed to recover emotionally in time to put together a stirring rally, they’re still not sure. In the immediate aftermath of Shazier’s injury there was only chaos and confusion.Outside linebacker Bud Dupree admitted he and inside linebacker Vince Williams — two of Shazier’s closest friends on the team — were under the impression Shazier had been blindsided by a member of the Bengals. The two spent the rest of the first half looking for revenge.“We were just walking around trying (to hit) the first person we see,” Dupree said. “We weren’t worried about football. We wanted to take up for our brother.”In the end, it’s Shazier who has taken up for his teammates.Though the 26-year-old remains open to the possibility of playing again — he’s able to get around the practice field without assistance these days and his practice clothes remain hanging in his locker much as they have been before he got hurt — he’s intent on helping in other ways.His mere presence provides an emotional lift, but Shazier is intent on being something far beyond an avatar for inspiration. He’s become a go-between of sorts between the coaching staff and the defense. He can cut through the clutter and deliver some “real talk” when necessary.During last Sunday’s 41-17 romp over Atlanta, Shazier sat on the bench with a tablet in hand. After every series the inside linebackers would crowd around him looking for instruction and insight. Shazier would offer words of encouragement when necessary or tips on how to avoid mistakes.“Since he’s not playing, his mental part of the game is so great,” Dupree said. “He shares a lot of stuff with us. He lets us know stuff ahead of time before the coaches even tell us. We already know it. It keeps us on our toes.”And it keeps Shazier engaged. There remains no timetable for when he will make a decision on whether returning to play is feasible. There’s so much going on in his life — from his physical recovery to his new role with the team to becoming a father for a second time — it hardly matters.Football remains an integral part of his plan no matter how his physical recovery goes. When asked if he believes Shazier could become an effective coach whenever his playing career ends, linebacker Tyler Matakevich nods enthusiastically.“You look at him, what he’s been through, how he’s handled it combined with his love for the game and his mind for the game, it’s amazing,” Matakevich said. “It hasn’t changed him. He’s been the same guy since the day I got here.”And in a way, Pittsburgh is counting on it. Shazier will be back on the turf in Cincinnati with the rest of the team on Sunday afternoon as the Steelers look for their first winning streak of the season. When the defense runs onto the field, he’ll linger behind, a feeling that will probably never truly feel normal.Yet if this is the best way for him to contribute, he’ll take it. So will the teammates who have come to rely on him in so many ways.“The only time he really doesn’t come is when he’s tired from rehab,” Dupree said. “You see him on the sideline. He’s active at practice. In the meetings. Never sleeping. Attacking every day like he’s still here.”NOTES: S Morgan Burnett (groin), LB L.J. Fort (ankle) and WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (ankle) did not practice on Wednesday. … LB Vince Williams (hamstring) and Edmunds (calf) were full participants.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/tag/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL In this Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers injured linebacker Ryan Shazier, right, poses with Pittsburgh Penguins NhL hockey player Sidney Crosby before an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)last_img read more

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Patterson’s promises did not end well the 1st time

first_imgDear Editor,I write to offer a warm welcome back to my parliamentary colleague, Mr David Patterson; the Public Infrastructure man seems to have been hibernating in a back room, Patterson has returned to the pages of our nation’s newspapers in his inimitable splashy style. Mr Patterson announced a 188-megawatt natural gas plant would be built by the Government, no cost or feasibility study was referenced, it would seem with no parliamentary oversight in place, anything can be said or promised during the election season. Patterson was accompanied by Larry London (of D’Urban Park fame) when he turned the sod for the construction of a new Civil Aviation Authority headquarters, despite no source of financing yet identified for this impressive-sounding building. The Patterson style!While Mr Patterson is in ‘announcement’ mode, the people of Guyana would have been pleased if he could have explained how US$9000 from the Chinese Consortium appeared in his personal bank account and if he could have produced evidence of transfer of the said US$9000 to MARAD. The people await announcements that the Auditor General has found the $600 million missing from the D’Urban Park Project; A completion date for the CJIA extension project; an explanation of how the CJIA cost the taxpayers, millions of US dollars more for a smaller airport than originally paid for by way of ‘fixed price’ contract; he would have come clean on how the Harbour Bridge feasibility study has cost 10s of millions more than approved by Cabinet and which has now been referred by the Public Procurement Commission to the Auditor General for forensic investigation.Patterson has taken every other opportunity for ‘announcements’, a ‘Skype call’ from a Virgin-Atlantic Airlines executive was parlayed into ‘Virgin coming’. Mr Patterson fears no embarrassment, taking to social media to claim credit for the expected increase in rice production; the fact is the rice farmers have demonstrated great resilience and tenacity resulting in an upswing in production despite adverse budget measures of the APNU/AFC that include application of 14 per cent VAT on machinery, sending up cost of acquisition; increase of land and water charges; the lack of assistance with drainage and irrigation; the removal of fertilizer subsidies and the virtual neglect of farm to market access roads.The mango season is upon us and we can expect more glib statements and empty promises from Mr Patterson and his colleagues. The people of Guyana have seen this play before; Mr Patterson’s promises did not end well the first time, maybe he should have done a feasibility study before returning to the limelight.Yours truly,Bishop Juan A Edghilllast_img read more