Patterson’s promises did not end well the 1st time

first_imgDear Editor,I write to offer a warm welcome back to my parliamentary colleague, Mr David Patterson; the Public Infrastructure man seems to have been hibernating in a back room, Patterson has returned to the pages of our nation’s newspapers in his inimitable splashy style. Mr Patterson announced a 188-megawatt natural gas plant would be built by the Government, no cost or feasibility study was referenced, it would seem with no parliamentary oversight in place, anything can be said or promised during the election season. Patterson was accompanied by Larry London (of D’Urban Park fame) when he turned the sod for the construction of a new Civil Aviation Authority headquarters, despite no source of financing yet identified for this impressive-sounding building. The Patterson style!While Mr Patterson is in ‘announcement’ mode, the people of Guyana would have been pleased if he could have explained how US$9000 from the Chinese Consortium appeared in his personal bank account and if he could have produced evidence of transfer of the said US$9000 to MARAD. The people await announcements that the Auditor General has found the $600 million missing from the D’Urban Park Project; A completion date for the CJIA extension project; an explanation of how the CJIA cost the taxpayers, millions of US dollars more for a smaller airport than originally paid for by way of ‘fixed price’ contract; he would have come clean on how the Harbour Bridge feasibility study has cost 10s of millions more than approved by Cabinet and which has now been referred by the Public Procurement Commission to the Auditor General for forensic investigation.Patterson has taken every other opportunity for ‘announcements’, a ‘Skype call’ from a Virgin-Atlantic Airlines executive was parlayed into ‘Virgin coming’. Mr Patterson fears no embarrassment, taking to social media to claim credit for the expected increase in rice production; the fact is the rice farmers have demonstrated great resilience and tenacity resulting in an upswing in production despite adverse budget measures of the APNU/AFC that include application of 14 per cent VAT on machinery, sending up cost of acquisition; increase of land and water charges; the lack of assistance with drainage and irrigation; the removal of fertilizer subsidies and the virtual neglect of farm to market access roads.The mango season is upon us and we can expect more glib statements and empty promises from Mr Patterson and his colleagues. The people of Guyana have seen this play before; Mr Patterson’s promises did not end well the first time, maybe he should have done a feasibility study before returning to the limelight.Yours truly,Bishop Juan A Edghilllast_img read more

NPA Signs MOU Extension with GPA

first_imgThe National Port Authority (NPA) and the Georgia Ports Authority have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) extending the ports’ partnership.Although, there is no monetary value to the MOU, the original one signed August, 4, 2010, to 2012, is being extended for an additional three years. The new MOU is geared towards expanding trade between the Southeastern United States and Liberia. The Port of Savannah is the highest-volume exporter to Liberia among U.S South Atlantic ports, and the highest in imports from Liberia.According to a statement from the NPA, the MOU encourages voluntary cooperation in the areas of capacity building, joint marketing activities, and information sharing on trade forecasts, market studies and developments in the shipping market, as well as details of modernization and technological improvements necessary to meet market demands and enhance throughput. The signing ceremony took place after the US-Liberia Trade and Investment Forum held September 15 and 16 in New York during which the Liberian Government’s Agenda for Transformation (AFT) was presented. In remarks, NPA Acting Managing Director David Williams expressed the government’s willingness to develop Seaport Industry evidenced by the completion of key projects in the Port of Greenville, the Port of Buchanan and plans by the NPA management to rehabilitate the Port of Harper.Mr. Williams said the NPA’s current management team places serious emphasis on developing the seaports, particularly in the areas of human resource, infrastructure development, automation, and the pavement of internal roads within the Freeport Port of Monrovia to enhance cargo movement. For his part, the Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) Executive Director, Curtis Foltz stated “It is with great pleasure that we welcome the Liberian delegation today to continue our trading partnership. As African trade continues to strengthen and increase, this agreement continues developing a foundation for even stronger growth.” As part of the agreement contained in the MOU, trainers from the GPA are expected to visit the NPA in April 2016 to begin training port operations personnel. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

YMCA Begins Post Ebola Recovery Program in Bong, Margibi

first_imgThe YMCA of Liberia has begun the implementation of a post Ebola recovery program aimed at rebuilding stronger and more resilient communities in the aftermath of the virus outbreak, according to a press release.Titled “Mobilizing Young People in Liberia and Sierra Leone to Rebuild Communities Devastated by the Ebola Outbreak,” activities under the project are intended to help rebuild the lives of young people in the project areas, while at the same time increasing security and cohesion, restoring livelihoods to affected beneficiaries, maintaining health & hygiene practices and habits and increasing resilience to future disasters. The proposed activities under the project will include: Psychosocial counseling for 100 young people to manage trauma related to the Ebola outbreak and training of 96 young people in leadership skills.The two year project will also involve the training of 54 young people and 30 teachers in peace education and mediation to establish school peace clubs, the conduct of youth-led peace building events involving 4,500 young people to strengthen community relations and reinforce young people’s role as positive change agents. Additionally, 140 young people and community members will attend engagement meetings with 44 government and CSO representatives to strengthen coordination for Ebola recovery, including peace and security. Two hundred thirty three young people will receive vocational or entrepreneurship and life skills training and post-training kits, and capital to set up or revitalize existing businesses or access employment. These young people will gain access to savings & credit groups to allow 154 young people build resilience.The Liberia YMCA will also under the project train 24 youth peer educators on health & hygiene awareness including Ebola prevention and reach 4,850 young people through a one on one and mass awareness-raising initiatives. This will include referral to health clinics. Eight water points and 8 latrines will be constructed and Water Sanitation and Hygiene committees established to ensure their maintenance.Additionally, 60 portable hand-washing points will be established, intended to improve access to health and WASH information and services to engender behavior change and prevent the spread of Ebola and prevalent diseases.Disaster resilience will be built through psychosocial first aid training for 80 community leaders; Disaster Risk Reduction Training of Trainers for 48 YMCA staff and County/District, Health Workers to deliver DRR training to 112 young people.The YMCA will also train 8 youth-led DRR committees of 56 members who will be established to lead DRR activities identified through HVCAs and reach 1,950 people through awareness raising and implementation of DRR action plans.The program will be implemented over a period of two years, February 1, 2016 to January 31, 2018 in Bong and Margibi Counties. In Margibi, four communities are benefiting which include: Larkayta, Mandingo Quarter, Gio Quarter, while in Bong County, Vi, Faiju, Gbaota and Barwolor communities are benefiting. During the life of the project, a total of 6,596 direct beneficiaries will be reached. The project is being implemented by the Liberia YMCA with funding from Comic Relief through Y Care International.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

AT&T aids Arnold’s after-school program

first_imgSACRAMENTO – Telephone giant AT&T, which spent millions last year to influence legislation giving the company access to California’s cable-television market, gave about $500,000 Tuesday to a private after-school program founded by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Schwarzenegger, who signed the 2006 cable law, attended a ceremony in San Antonio, where AT&T’s philanthropic arm announced the donation to the governor’s nonprofit After-School All-Stars program. Schwarzenegger founded the national program in 1992 as a way to provide tutoring services and sports to at-risk middle-school students. It has affiliates in 14 cities. For AT&T, Tuesday’s donation followed a 2006 legislative session in which California lawmakers approved a law giving the company and Verizon Communications access to the state’s $5.3 billion-a-year cable-TV market. The law took effect in January. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In 2006, AT&T gave $744,614 to political candidates and campaigns, including $44,600 to Schwarzenegger. Meanwhile, the company spent $23.6 million to hire lobbyists and pay for television commercials promoting the cable bill. Verizon and its employees contributed $395,347 to political candidates and campaigns, and the company spent $2.3 million on lobbying expenses. The chairman of the after-school program, former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, a Cabinet member in the Clinton administration, said he sought the donation from AT&T, which is headquartered in the Texas city. “They have been very generous to a range of nonprofit activities, so it made sense for them to support the After-School All-Stars,” Cisneros said. The program serves about 65,000 children in 15 cities, he said. It started out providing sports activities for kids but has been transformed into an academic program, he added.last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTUESDAY Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a games social, 7 p.m. in Lancaster. Bring a snack to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 946-5222. Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Ex-sergeant ‘enlists’ for kids

first_imgPALMDALE – Retired Army Sgt. Leroy Garner volunteers so often at Highland High School that when he’s gone, students call him on his cell phone to ask why. Called “Coach G” or “Mr. G” around campus, he regularly puts in eight- and 10-hour days, dispensing advice to teens, mentoring them in their senior projects, helping out swamped school staff during class registration and coaching boys basketball. “He is such a great person with a great personality, someone you can talk to, especially with the boys here,” parent volunteer coordinator Monica Barrus said. “If there’s a student who wants to learn to drive, he takes time to teach him. He’s got a heart of gold. He’ll do anything for anybody.” Garner puts in more hours than any other volunteers at the high school, where he assists in the counseling and attendance offices and the cafeteria. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsHe compiled 617 hours in 2005 and 443 hours in 2004. Between January and March of this year, the total is 154 hours. He also is varsity assistant basketball coach, for which he receives a stipend, and this year he has started working as a substitute custodian. Garner also helps Highland coach Jeff Smith run a summer basketball league, and he is facility manager for the Antelope Valley Athletic Club’s basketball program for 600 boys. Garner, who spent 22 years in the Army, was named the school’s Volunteer of the Year in 2005, and this year he was given special recognition and a plaque by the board in April for his exemplary service. Principal Stacy Bryant said Garner is an integral part of the school. In running banter with her, Garner says she will have to hire him because he is at the school so often. She jokes back: “Why would I pay you for 40 hours when I get you for 80 hours for free?” “He’s everywhere,” she said. “He hangs out at lunch, helps kids, facilitates things if they are having trouble with class. Or if they have a problem on campus, he goes and helps them work through it. “He’ll set up meetings with teachers to find out what students need to do to get a better grade. He’s very much a parent to a lot of kids on campus, at-risk or otherwise,” Bryant said. “He fills in where we need any kind of help. He happily does it. He loves kids, and the kids know that. He holds their toes to the fire. He makes them do what needs to be done, but he also is their advocate, and that’s important. The kids know they can go to him,” Bryant added. Garner, a Lancaster resident, began volunteering at Highland to keep track of one of his foster children. He had volunteered at other schools when the children were younger. Garner was a foster parent for nine years and helped raise 89 children. He assumed guardianship over several of them. “After I came out of the Army, I bought a big house. It had spare rooms. I loved kids. I just started taking care of foster kids,” said Garner, who is not married and has two grown children of his own. One summer he noticed the Highland staff was just swamped during registration, so he started to help out. “I got attached to Highland and fell in love,” Garner said. Guidance clerk Dianamarie Prevatt described Garner as very compassionate and kind. “He helps us out with registration, talks with parents when they come into register, helps review paperwork to make sure they live in the attendance area,” guidance clerk Dianamarie Prevatt said. For his birthday in April, students brought him a cake. “I like working with the kids. God gave me a gift of working with young people,” Garner said. “A lot of them come to me with problems, stuff they don’t go to their parents with. When they come to the counseling office, they ask for me: Is Mr. G. here?” Senior Ron Holden said Garner has been like an uncle to him. “He’s real big in the sports community. People who didn’t think they could play, he always gives them a chance, welcoming people with open arms,” Holden said. “My freshmen year he asked me to join his basketball traveling team. From then on, he helped me improve my basketball skills. He helped me become a young man besides being a good basketball player.” Board member Jim Lott, who suggested that the board honor Garner, said his own son is among players Garner has coached. Garner takes children home after practice if they don’t have rides or waits with them, sometimes up to an hour, for their parents to pick them up, Lott said. “He keeps hundreds of kids off the streets. That’s critical at this age level. They love him,” Lott said. “He disciplines like a sergeant in the Army. As a person they respect him. He counsels them about classes. He teaches respect and character. He follows them to see how their grades are doing. He follows attendance. He’s a neat person for kids.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

‘METEORITE OVER DONEGAL’ CLAIM WAS FAKE

first_imgCLAIMS of a meteorite over south Donegal have been dismissed as a fake.There had been online claims of a sighting over the county yesterday.But experts say anyone seeing a meteorite here would have needed he eyesight of Superman – a small object was spotted over the Irish Sea…lasting five seconds!  ‘METEORITE OVER DONEGAL’ CLAIM WAS FAKE was last modified: January 16th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalmeteorlast_img read more

Car with no tax since 2013 leads to court date for driver

first_imgGardai in Letterkenny have apprehended a car which has not been taxed for five years.Members of the Traffic Corps stopped the Subaru Impreza in recent days.The distinctive car was stopped and Gardai also discovered the driver had no insurance or NCT. An official Garda twitter comment remarked “Donegal rally is well and truly over for this driver.”The driver is expected to appear before the local courts in the coming weeks.Car with no tax since 2013 leads to court date for driver was last modified: June 26th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalletterkennySubaru Imprezataxlast_img read more

Using Public Data to Fight a War

first_imgThat reveals the explicit information that people have entered, but what’s particularly impressive about Cazoodle’s work is that it also merges in implicit information from sources like Flickr. For example, running a search on the photo service shows hundreds of photos taken within Afghanistan mentioning “mosque” in their descriptions. The coordinates can be pulled out of the geotagged photos, and used as an input to the list of mosques for the town they were taken in. Without realizing it, photographers are helping to build up a crowd-sourced map of everywhere they shoot. This isn’t completely unprecedented; during World War Two the BBC appealed for holiday photos of the beaches of Normandy for an exhibition. In fact, the 9 million snaps received were used to research landing sites for the coming invasion.ResultsThe end result of the gathering process is a console that Army personnel can use to pull up information on towns across the country, giving a detailed breakdown of all the data that’s been gathered on the location: 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Why You Love Online Quizzes Related Posts pete warden What I find most fascinating about this project is that it’s the first practical application for ‘linked data’. In contrast to the more academic approach, Cazoodle has attacked the problem in a much messier but more pragmatic way. A good example of this is how the system uses “fuzzy matching” to link data from different sources together. That means if OpenStreetMap shows a mosque in a particular location, and a Flickr photo with coordinates a hundred yards away mentions a mosque in the description, then it’s reasonable to assume they represent the same place, even though there’s a small probability that’s incorrect.This means data may not be quite as vetted as a more traditionally sourced gazetteer, but it has much broader coverage and is far more dynamic. In many ways, it’s like the tradeoff between Yahoo’s original hand-edited directory and Google’s chaotic but all-encompassing search index. By lowering the barriers to data entry, and in many cases using public information people don’t even realize they’re revealing, Cazoodle is able to create an effective guide.The project is still being evaluated by the Army right now, and hasn’t been used in the field, but it’s not hard to imagine this approach becoming far more common as public data sources grow and multiply. It also illustrates the conflicts we’ll face more and more frequently as this public data is used for completely unintended purposes. How will local photographers and OpenStreetMap editors feel if their work is reused by the U.S. Army? Christopher Albon, a researcher into public health in warzones also has some cautionary words on the limits of what can be done remotely: While an impressive start, Cazoodle’s approach is missing the data that really matters. A map of a physical space only takes you so far. An Afghan village is no more a collection of mosques and houses than Silicon Valley is a collection of coffee shops and office space. What matters is a location’s social, political, and economic structures; its human terrain. Who is related to whom? Who owns the fertile fields by the river or the rocky fields on the slopes? Who is healthy and who is sick? Cazoodle can not provide this type of information, leaving American soldiers to gather it the old fashioned way: talking to people door to door, face to face.center_img Tags:#Big Data#hack Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Photo by James Vaughn How does a technology built for apartment-hunting end up being evaluated by the U.S. Army for use in Afghanistan? Cazoodle is using public data sources like Flickr and OpenStreetMap to build detailed guidebooks for American soldiers. Last week at Strata I sat down with company CTO Govind Kabra to find out how they do it.Its project for the Army is to build a detailed database of information about places in Afghanistan, using only public sources on the Web. The goal is to describe in detail the towns and cities including everything from names, locations and populations, as well as lists and coordinates for schools, mosques, banks and hotels. The military already collects this sort of information, but using traditional offline sources through groups like the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. It’s a slow and dangerous process to send personnel door to door for research within war-torn countries, and though the agency’s budget is classified, presumably very expensive. The hope is that by using online, crowdsourced data from sites like Wikipedia and Flickr, it will be possible to gather rich information without putting lives at risk, all at a fraction of the cost.OriginsCazoodle was started four years ago at the University of Illinois – Urbana Champaign. Kubra and his co-founders were graduate students, so naturally the top of their priority list was finding a cheap apartment. As they trawled through Craiglist, following links to other sites, consulting maps and looking up details, they realized that what they really needed was an automated way of pulling the information they cared about from all these disparate sources, and putting it into a single spreadsheet they could use to make their decisions easier. They formed the company to build this system, and created an apartment search engine based on the technology.The founders knew there were lots of other problems that would also benefit from the same underlying technology, so they branched out into shopping and vacations, and also started building custom search engines for enterprise customers. That was when they spotted a Small Business Innovation Research grant opportunity from the U.S. Department of Defense. The task was to curate public information on the Web related to Afghanistan into a single database that Army personnel could use to guide their operations. Their technology already took a soup of unstructured Web pages related to locations and converted it into a spreadsheet of data, cleanly split into labeled columns, so it seemed like a natural fit for this problem.TechnologyTo understand how it works, imagine trying to create a list of mosques in a small town in Afghanistan. There’s no handy Yellow Pages you can refer to, and the maps don’t have that much detail. However, if you go to Wikipedia you can pull out basic information about a town like Pul-i-Alam, and then look through the OpenStreetMap data for Afghanistan to spot locations that are tagged as religious buildings, eg: How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees?last_img read more

Golfer Woods was asleep at wheel, passed breath test – police

first_imgMOST READ The 14-time major winner has blamed the DUI arrest near his home in Jupiter, Florida, on an adverse reaction to prescription medication.READ: Golfer Tiger Woods sorry for arrest, says no alcohol involvedFEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingHis police report, obtained and published by several media outlets, said Woods was “co-operative” and “confused” when found by police, with “extremely slow and slurred speech.”He initially told officers he had been driving back to Florida from Los Angeles but later stated “he did not know where he was.” Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games NBA Finals coverage still hangs Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Tiger Woods apologized on Monday, May 30, 2017, after he was arrested for driving under the influence. He denied alcohol was involved saying he was taking medication. The Palm Beach County (Florida) police released the mugshot of Woods. PALM BEACH COUNTY PHOTOMIAMI, United States — Tiger Woods was found asleep at the wheel of his car when he was arrested, police records showed Tuesday as golf legend Jack Nicklaus pledged support for the troubled former world number one.Woods, who issued a statement on Monday saying alcohol was not involved in the incident, needed to be woken by a police officer, his arrest report showed.ADVERTISEMENT BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds “It offers visual proof of the news, of another public embarrassment,” Sobel wrote.“There is no positive way to spin this story. No silver lining, no beneficial after-effects that might spring from it — the main takeaway here is sadness. Just pure sadness.” CBBSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “Tiger’s a friend,” Nicklaus told the Golf Channel. “He’s been great for the game of golf. He needs our help.“I feel bad for him. He’s struggling … He needs support from a lot of people. I’ll be one of them.”A police mugshot of Woods looking bleary-eyed and unshaven rapidly went viral after its release on Monday, underscoring the fall from grace of the superstar athlete once renowned as a clean-living, corporate pitchman.“I would like to apologize with all my heart to my family, friends and the fans. I expect more from myself too,” Woods said in a statement issued late Monday.‘He needs our help’The arrest is the latest gloomy episode to hit the athlete, who once towered over his sport before being engulfed by turmoil in his private life and a series of debilitating injuries.His return from a year-long injury layoff was cut short in February when he pulled out of the Dubai Desert Classic after the first round because of back pain.News of Woods’ arrest was pored over in detail by US media on Tuesday, with many commentators unable to resist comparing the golfer’s disheveled mugshot with images of the fresh-faced superstar in his heyday.“What happened to the young man we all thought we knew…Where has he gone?” asked USA Today columnist Christine Brennan, contrasting the mugshot with an image of Woods from one of his most famous victories, winning the Masters in 1997 at the age of 21.“What a stunning contrast these two photos are, taken 20 years and seven weeks apart,” Brennan added. “They chart the rise and fall of a man who had it all, then watched it crumble away, all of it self-induced.”ESPN writer Jason Sobel commented that the mugshot “offers tangible representation” of Woods’ decline in fortunes. Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games The golfer was unable to complete various roadside sobriety tests which included standing on one leg and the “walk and turn” test.However contrary to reports on Monday which said Woods refused a breathalyzer test, the golfer agreed and “blew zeroes” indicating there was no alcohol in his system.Woods also told police he had been using four prescription medications including the powerful painkiller Vicodin, which is commonly prescribed following surgery.Woods has undergone four separate surgeries on his back since 2014, with the most recent procedure taking place in late April.News of the 41-year-old’s arrest has triggered alarm throughout the golfing world. On Tuesday, Nicklaus offered words of support for Woods.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LATEST STORIES Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more