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Bob Weir To Join Dumpstaphunk Tonight For Annual Halloween Show

first_imgDumpstaphunk will return to Sweetwater Music Hall tonight for their annual Halloween celebration in Mill Valley, CA. For the second year in a row, Grateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir will join the New Orleans funk masters for a night of mischief music, alongside the Jazz Mafia Horns. In 2016, Weir joined Dumpstaphunk for a “Shakedown Street >Dear Prudence > Iko Iko > Big Chief New Orleans Medley > Knockin’ on Heavens Door” medley that kept fans dancing all night long. There’s no telling what will go down tonight, but the band warns fans to come on out and “find out what tricks n treats we gonna pull outta the Dumpsta!!”There is a limited supply of tickets left here.Check out a taste of what’s to come in the video below, from last year’s “Shakedown Street”:last_img read more

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Sinclairville Man Arrested After Police Find Him Driving Stolen Vehicle

first_imgSINCLAIRVILLE – A Village of Sinclairville man was arrested Sunday after New York State Police say he was pulled over in a stolen vehicle.Troopers say Dakota Barber, 28, was pulled over for a traffic violation on Park Street.Through investigation, troopers discovered that the license plates did not belong to the vehicle, which was reported stolen from California.Additionally, the license plates were reported stolen from a truck stop in Tennessee, police say. Barber is charged with fourth and fifth-degree criminal possession of stolen property.Police say Barber was placed under arrest, processed at State Police Barracks in Jamestown and transported to the Chautauqua County Jail. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Sunny Afternoon & Angela Lansbury Honored at Oliviers

first_imgSunny Afternoon was the big winner at the Olivier Awards on April 12, garnering the most awards, four, for any single production including Best Musical. A View From The Bridge won three—Best Revival, Best Actor for Mark Strong and Best Director for Ivo Van Hove. Other notable honorees at the U.K.’s equivalent of the Tonys, held once again at London’s Royal Opera House, include Angela Lansbury, winning her first Olivier for Blithe Spirit and Wolf Hall’s Nathaniel Parker, who is currently reprising his now Olivier-winning role of Henry VIII on Broadway.The compete list of winners is as follows:BEST NEW MUSICALSunny AfternoonBEST MUSICAL REVIVALCity Of AngelsBEST NEW PLAYKing Charles IIIBEST REVIVALA View From The BridgeBEST NEW COMEDYThe Play That Goes WrongAUDIENCE AWARDWickedBEST ENTERTAINMENT AND FAMILYLa SoiréeBEST ACTORMark Strong for A View From The BridgeBEST ACTRESSPenelope Wilton for Taken At MidnightBEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLENathaniel Parker for Wolf Hall and Bring Up The BodiesBEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLEAngela Lansbury for Blithe SpiritBEST ACTOR IN A MUSICALJohn Dagleish for Sunny AfternoonBEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICALKatie Brayben for Beautiful: The Carole King MusicalBEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICALGeorge Maguire for Sunny AfternoonBEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICALLorna Want for Beautiful: The Carole King MusicalBEST DIRECTORIvo Van Hove for A View From The BridgeBEST THEATRE CHOREOGRAPHERSergio Trujillo for Memphis The MusicalBEST LIGHTING DESIGNHoward Harrison for City Of AngelsBEST SET DESIGNEs Devlin for The NetherBEST COSTUME DESIGNChristopher Oram for Wolf Hall and Bring Up The BodiesBEST SOUND DESIGNGareth Owen for Memphis The MusicalOUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSICRay Davies for Sunny AfternoonOUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN AN AFFILIATE THEATREBull at The Maria at Young VicBEST NEW OPERA PRODUCTIONThe Mastersingers Of NurembergOUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN OPERARichard Jones for his direction of The Girl Of The Golden West, The Mastersingers Of Nuremberg and RodelindaOUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN DANCECrystal Pite for her choreography in the productions of The Associates: A Picture Of You Falling, The Tempest Replica and Polarisat Sadler’s WellsBEST NEW DANCE PRODUCTION32 Rue Vandenbranden and Juliet And Romeo – Tie.This year’s Special Award winners were Sylvie Guillem and Kevin Spacey. View Commentslast_img read more

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Cancer cooking class

first_imgMore than 40,000 people are diagnosed with cancer each year in Georgia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and nearly 15,000 die. The exact cause of cancer is unknown. But there are ways to help prevent this deadly disease. “More and more, research on chronic diseases has shown that what we eat and how active we are influences our risk for these diseases and even our chances for recovery or effective long-term management if we become ill,” said Connie Crawley, a nutrition expert with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. “Overall, a plant-based diet that emphasizes whole grains, fruits and vegetables, low-fat or non-fat dairy foods and small amounts of nuts and vegetable oils seems to be the most protective.”UGA Extension agents across the state routinely hold classes to teach people about cancer and what steps they can take to limit their risk for it. Eating well and leading a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk of cancer by up to 50 percent, according to the National Cancer Institute.Cooking class“We teach families how they can eat healthy, but still eat well, while improving their health and reducing their risk for chronic disease,” said Denise Everson, UGA Extension Family and Consumer Sciences agent in Oconee County.Nancy Dennis came to one of Everson’s classes to help her family. “I have a 12-year-old son, and he is a getting to be a little bigger. I don’t want him to have obesity issues as he grows,” Dennis said. “I need to learn how to cook healthier and change my eating habits.” Manage risk“We are exposed to carcinogens everyday,” Everson told the class. “There are no miracle foods or proven causes. We only know what makes developing cancer less likely.” Eating saturated fats, or those found in whole milk products and meat and poultry skins, can increase cholesterol levels. Everson recommended consuming unsaturated fats like those found in vegetable oils or omega-3 fatty acids found in fish such as salmon or tuna. To cut fat and cholesterol, Crawley says to: Bake, broil, boil or grill food. Choose lean cuts of meat like loin, leg or round cuts.Remove skin from poultry. Eat vegetables, whole grains or fruits. Eat fish twice a week. Season food with fat-free broth or herbs and spices instead of fatty meats or butter. Choose low-fat and non-fat dairy foods. Use ground turkey breast and ground chicken breast. Eat less lunchmeats and prepared meats. Replace whole eggs in recipes with egg whites or egg substitute. Choose “light” or “heart healthy” menu items when dining out. Knowing portion size, Crawley said, is important. A portion of vegetables, fruit or grains is half a cup, or about a handful. Meat portions should be 3 ounces, or the size of a deck of cards. A ping pong ball is the size of a portion of peanut butter, or 2 tablespoons. Get MovingGet moving 30 minutes or more every day. “For cancer, the more vigorous and regular the physical activity is, the better the reduction in risk,” Crawley said. “For most other chronic diseases, moderate activity for about 30 to 60 minutes seems to be enough.” Plan well to make slow, realistic changes. “We learn to crave sweet and salty foods, and we can change our habits,” Everson said. “The simple steps we take today, improved eating habits and an active lifestyle, can decrease our risk for chronic disease and improve our overall well-being.”For more information on healthy life choices or similar classes in your area, contact a local UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

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Dutch Caribbean Islands Combat a Different Type of Piracy

first_img Commodore Hans Lodder: I meant that you cannot expect a nation to share all the information with everyone who is playing on the field. That’s just impossible. What I meant to say is that, if you require information you tell someone, “Listen, in order to do my operation well, this is the information I require and then I can do this with that information.” Then it’s much easier to tell someone, “If that’s what you require, we can set up an arrangement for you to get that information. The more you want the more complex the arrangements become.” So instead of asking for a whole array that’s available, just ask for what you actually require for what you want to do with it. That makes it much easier and that’s what I meant with it, because if you want to go and say, “We want everything, nobody will do it.” DIÁLOGO: Your area of responsibility sounds very interesting and exciting, but it’s not a walk in the park, is it? DIÁLOGO: For an outsider, the Netherlands looks like a country that is very open with regard to drug use, including the presence of so-called coffee shops, where you can buy drugs freely. So what is the big concern in this region? DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, you mentioned that you feel information-gathering and sharing is almost a utopia, because countries don’t share enough. What did you mean by that? DIÁLOGO: Do you think that the fact that Aruba and Curacao are rich islands attracts more drugs and drug dealers? DIÁLOGO: What’s the significance of being close to South America? Commodore Hans Lodder: Being close to South American countries means that there is a lot of illicit trafficking from those nations coming up through the area I’m responsible for and making its way up to either North America or Europe, and that’s something we don’t really like, so we try to stop those in advance. Commodore Hans Lodder: It could be. I think the overall approach of JIATF-South of incorporating more and more agencies is the same thing we did in Afghanistan. We had this strategy called the 3D Approach: defense, diplomacy and development. It’s an overall approach to the problem, not just a defense approach, but an overall government approach and what you do is get all the agencies involved. You are not just looking at fighting the crime that is there, but also at getting rid of the source of the crime, which means that you have programs to help nations educate a population, not just educate their police force, because, again, that’s the aspirin to the problem and you want to get to the root cause of it. That could be something which we should be doing more often, and if you do it multinationally, that strengthens the strategy even more because then you can actually contain the region and contain the problem. Commodore Hans Lodder: This conference was great because it’s the way that you meet up with each other and the only way forward for the military to work together and inform each other. It’s not about only sharing information, but about informing each other, knowing each other and communicating. That’s the most important part. Commodore Hans Lodder: No, it is not. It is indeed interesting; it is exciting, but it is a challenge because the three islands, Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao are close to South America. The other three islands are about 600 to 800 miles away. It’s a rather large area with a lot of traffic and open to a lot of illegal traffic coming through. Commodore Hans Lodder: Not really. What we are seeing is that they are used more as transfer ports. Of course, there is drug use in any nation, but the fact that they are so close to the source doesn’t mean there is more use of drugs than in any other nation. It’s more about how they are transporting them that is an issue, because they use these islands as a hub. DIÁLOGO: When I interviewed Brigadier General Dick Swijgman two years ago during CANSEC 2013, he told me that little by little, the Dutch islands in the Caribbean are starting to suffer through what other islands in the region have been facing for a while now, meaning, young males getting access to heavy weaponry because the drug traffickers leave them behind as they pass through. These individuals then organize themselves into gangs. Did this problem increase or decrease in the last two years? Commodore Hans Lodder: There is a difference, I think. In the Netherlands, the politics on the use of soft drugs is that it’s not legal. However it’s—you can use soft drugs for your own use, that’s basically what we said. Hard drugs are still illegal, so we enforce the laws very strongly in reference to that. So it’s being seen by the outside world as a very open country where everybody does drugs. It’s absolutely not the case. It is controlled. Also, there are strict regulations with regard to the coffee shops, the owners of which have to abide by and if they don’t, they are closed down. We have laws on how you should open the coffee shop, but also which kind of people could buy things over there and so on. So it’s not as open-minded as some people think, and if you go over there, you can see it yourself. It is controlled, and we really are hard on the hard drugs because of all the criminality that comes with it. DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, you mentioned that you feel information-gathering and sharing is almost a utopia, because countries don’t share enough. What did you mean by that? Commodore Hans Lodder: It could be. I think the overall approach of JIATF-South of incorporating more and more agencies is the same thing we did in Afghanistan. We had this strategy called the 3D Approach: defense, diplomacy and development. It’s an overall approach to the problem, not just a defense approach, but an overall government approach and what you do is get all the agencies involved. You are not just looking at fighting the crime that is there, but also at getting rid of the source of the crime, which means that you have programs to help nations educate a population, not just educate their police force, because, again, that’s the aspirin to the problem and you want to get to the root cause of it. That could be something which we should be doing more often, and if you do it multinationally, that strengthens the strategy even more because then you can actually contain the region and contain the problem. DIÁLOGO: What’s the significance of being close to South America? Commodore Hans Lodder: There is a difference, I think. In the Netherlands, the politics on the use of soft drugs is that it’s not legal. However it’s—you can use soft drugs for your own use, that’s basically what we said. Hard drugs are still illegal, so we enforce the laws very strongly in reference to that. So it’s being seen by the outside world as a very open country where everybody does drugs. It’s absolutely not the case. It is controlled. Also, there are strict regulations with regard to the coffee shops, the owners of which have to abide by and if they don’t, they are closed down. We have laws on how you should open the coffee shop, but also which kind of people could buy things over there and so on. So it’s not as open-minded as some people think, and if you go over there, you can see it yourself. It is controlled, and we really are hard on the hard drugs because of all the criminality that comes with it. DIÁLOGO: When I interviewed Brigadier General Dick Swijgman two years ago during CANSEC 2013, he told me that little by little, the Dutch islands in the Caribbean are starting to suffer through what other islands in the region have been facing for a while now, meaning, young males getting access to heavy weaponry because the drug traffickers leave them behind as they pass through. These individuals then organize themselves into gangs. Did this problem increase or decrease in the last two years? DIÁLOGO: The Netherlands participate actively in operations conducted by the Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-South). Is JIATF-South a model that should be replicated? Commodore Hans Lodder: It’s not the same in all the islands. All six islands are different and also their problems are different. The problem you see over there is always related to economic problems. Is there enough employment, is there enough future for the youth? What we see is that we are doing a lot together with the other nations on these kinds of problems. In Curacao and Aruba, we have a program in place with the government to help the youth that has been involved in small crime, to train them, to also give them education so they can have a future, and that’s the way we try to get these people out of the crime organizations and the criminal activities. That being said, during the last year, Curacao saw an increase in crime, and the local government acted on it. They asked for our help, and we responded. We are slowly pushing it back, but it’s a long-term process, and it’s not something you can solve straight away, unfortunately. To talk about this and other issues affecting the Dutch islands in the Caribbean, Diálogo talked with Netherlands Navy Commodore Hans Lodder, Commander-in-Chief of the Netherlands Forces in the Caribbean and director of the Dutch Coast Guard in the Caribbean, during the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC 2015), in Nassau, Bahamas, during 20-23 January. DIÁLOGO: Your area of responsibility sounds very interesting and exciting, but it’s not a walk in the park, is it? To talk about this and other issues affecting the Dutch islands in the Caribbean, Diálogo talked with Netherlands Navy Commodore Hans Lodder, Commander-in-Chief of the Netherlands Forces in the Caribbean and director of the Dutch Coast Guard in the Caribbean, during the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC 2015), in Nassau, Bahamas, during 20-23 January. Commodore Hans Lodder: Being close to South American countries means that there is a lot of illicit trafficking from those nations coming up through the area I’m responsible for and making its way up to either North America or Europe, and that’s something we don’t really like, so we try to stop those in advance. For some, the area of responsibility of the Netherlands Forces in the Caribbean, which encompasses the nations of Aruba, Curacao, and Saint Martin, as well as the dominions of Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius might sound like an idealized paradise, but in reality, patrolling their waters has become a daunting task since the amount of drugs trying to reach the United States multiplied in recent years. Commodore Hans Lodder: No, it is not. It is indeed interesting; it is exciting, but it is a challenge because the three islands, Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao are close to South America. The other three islands are about 600 to 800 miles away. It’s a rather large area with a lot of traffic and open to a lot of illegal traffic coming through. Commodore Hans Lodder: Not really. What we are seeing is that they are used more as transfer ports. Of course, there is drug use in any nation, but the fact that they are so close to the source doesn’t mean there is more use of drugs than in any other nation. It’s more about how they are transporting them that is an issue, because they use these islands as a hub. DIÁLOGO: How would you asses CANSEC 2015? Commodore Hans Lodder: I meant that you cannot expect a nation to share all the information with everyone who is playing on the field. That’s just impossible. What I meant to say is that, if you require information you tell someone, “Listen, in order to do my operation well, this is the information I require and then I can do this with that information.” Then it’s much easier to tell someone, “If that’s what you require, we can set up an arrangement for you to get that information. The more you want the more complex the arrangements become.” So instead of asking for a whole array that’s available, just ask for what you actually require for what you want to do with it. That makes it much easier and that’s what I meant with it, because if you want to go and say, “We want everything, nobody will do it.” DIÁLOGO: For an outsider, the Netherlands looks like a country that is very open with regard to drug use, including the presence of so-called coffee shops, where you can buy drugs freely. So what is the big concern in this region? DIÁLOGO: Do you think that the fact that Aruba and Curacao are rich islands attracts more drugs and drug dealers? Commodore Hans Lodder: This conference was great because it’s the way that you meet up with each other and the only way forward for the military to work together and inform each other. It’s not about only sharing information, but about informing each other, knowing each other and communicating. That’s the most important part. this multimedia news site is the best information site for the Dominicans For some, the area of responsibility of the Netherlands Forces in the Caribbean, which encompasses the nations of Aruba, Curacao, and Saint Martin, as well as the dominions of Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius might sound like an idealized paradise, but in reality, patrolling their waters has become a daunting task since the amount of drugs trying to reach the United States multiplied in recent years. Commodore Hans Lodder: That’s the same kind of idea, basically. It is the needle in the haystack that you are looking for. I have been trained in the past to find Soviet submarines in the Northern Hemisphere, which was also the same kind of idea. So what I did by fighting pirates is I just used the tactics I learned to find Soviet submarines and that’s the same issue here. That’s a great thing of the military training they give people, it’s not something you learn for one specific task. If you used it and if you used it cleverly, you can use it in a much broader spectrum. So you can look at this whole idea and say okay, how would we approach finding drug smugglers in the area I am responsible for? It’s a big ocean and it’s a small ship. The Soviet submarine was in an enormous ocean and under water. We were still able to find them and that’s the same here, and that’s how I did it. In Somalia, we did the same. DIÁLOGO: How would you asses CANSEC 2015? Commodore Hans Lodder: That’s the same kind of idea, basically. It is the needle in the haystack that you are looking for. I have been trained in the past to find Soviet submarines in the Northern Hemisphere, which was also the same kind of idea. So what I did by fighting pirates is I just used the tactics I learned to find Soviet submarines and that’s the same issue here. That’s a great thing of the military training they give people, it’s not something you learn for one specific task. If you used it and if you used it cleverly, you can use it in a much broader spectrum. So you can look at this whole idea and say okay, how would we approach finding drug smugglers in the area I am responsible for? It’s a big ocean and it’s a small ship. The Soviet submarine was in an enormous ocean and under water. We were still able to find them and that’s the same here, and that’s how I did it. In Somalia, we did the same. DIÁLOGO: You participated in a mission in Somalia that involved counter piracy operations. How does it compare to your current mission? DIÁLOGO: You participated in a mission in Somalia that involved counter piracy operations. How does it compare to your current mission? DIÁLOGO: The Netherlands participate actively in operations conducted by the Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-South). Is JIATF-South a model that should be replicated? Commodore Hans Lodder: It’s not the same in all the islands. All six islands are different and also their problems are different. The problem you see over there is always related to economic problems. Is there enough employment, is there enough future for the youth? What we see is that we are doing a lot together with the other nations on these kinds of problems. In Curacao and Aruba, we have a program in place with the government to help the youth that has been involved in small crime, to train them, to also give them education so they can have a future, and that’s the way we try to get these people out of the crime organizations and the criminal activities. That being said, during the last year, Curacao saw an increase in crime, and the local government acted on it. They asked for our help, and we responded. We are slowly pushing it back, but it’s a long-term process, and it’s not something you can solve straight away, unfortunately. By Dialogo March 03, 2015last_img read more

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You can do it! Motivation in 3 easy steps

first_imgIn a 2018 Gallup poll, only 34% of employees were actively engaged in their workplace and a 2015 SHRM report stated that 69% of respondents said they were consistently putting all of their effort into their work. These numbers clearly indicate the importance motivation tools hold in a workplace. Motivation is a powerful leadership tool that can and should be leveraged by managers to help inject a spark of inspiration into a lagging or underperforming team. Incorporating motivational practices into your workplace initiates a switch from making assumptions about your employees’ work to taking action in recognizing each team member’s accomplishments.Why Does Motivation Matter? Motivation helps achieve goals. Employee performance is directly impacted if they feel recognized and supported by their team and upper management. This is important to you, as the employer, because employee productivity directly impacts employer productivity and growth opportunities, such as profit, and company performance, of course, but also in human resources and employee turnover. Finding the right incentives can stimulate performance and motivate employees to achieve goals by emphasizing individual strengths, and how those individual strengths are contributing to the team’s overall successes. Here are 3 ways to bring motivation into your workplace. 1. RecognizeRecognition is a straightforward way to encourage your employees and identity good work that has been accomplished. By pointing out employees who are performing well, it confirms and reinforces that the work being accomplished is right and encourages employees to keep up the good work. There’s an emotional connection that is created between employer and employee, and helps individuals feel like they belong to their team and are a contributor in their workplace. Put a formal program in place. This could be monthly or quarterly public recognitions that elevate employees who are doing good work to help your credit union perhaps through a nomination system or by manager submission.  Ask for employee participation. Don’t let recognition only come from the top, but encourage your teams to raise one another up, and acknowledge good work being accomplished.2. Appreciate As a manager or leader in your credit union, be sure to lead teammates with your appreciation. This does not necessarily need to be public recognition, but can be an expression of gratitude to your employees for their hard work in a more casual work environment. A quick thank you can have a long-lasting motivating effect. Express gratitude. A quick handwritten note, email, or shoutout in a meeting are all ways to show appreciation for hard work. Celebrate team wins. It’s important to give your teams an opportunity to celebrate and praise good things that are happening. This can be informal or a repeating agenda item for regular, repeating meetings in the form of a shoutout, or some other form of appreciation. 3. RewardReward good behavior. Both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards can be powerful motivators. Of course, money or monetary rewards are one generous way to show appreciation to your employees. But, it’s important to keep intrinsic incentives in mind as well where employees can rally around corporate core values through team-building or goal-driven initiatives. Create an incentive program. This may be fueled by monetary incentives or with opportunities to learn new skills in order to reach professional goals. By creating a program that encourages employees to both recognize one another and be recognized for exceptional work, opportunities are presented to motivate one another. Creating an encouraging and rewarding work culture shows an appreciation for your employees and increases productivity for the team as a whole. Taking the time to initiate recognition programs into your workplace will keep them encouraged to continue and bring forward their best work. 79SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Julie ann Wessinger Julie ann Wessinger has spent the majority of her career helping organizations develop and enhance their internal sales and service culture. In her role with Allied Solutions, she works with … Web: www.alliedsolutions.net Detailslast_img read more

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How credit unions can stay ahead of the curve as contactless payment use rises because of COVID-19

first_img 22SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Libby Calderone Libby Calderone is President/COO of LSC. In her role, Libby is responsible for the growth and retention of LSC’s business, as well as its future business strategy and … Details https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/mobile-payments-markethttps://creditcards.usnews.com/articles/how-do-contactless-credit-cards-and-payments-workhttps://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/issue-briefs/2019/10/are-americans-embracing-mobile-payments Contactless payment use is on the rise. According to Allied Market Research, the mobile payment market size is expected to have a compound annual growth rate of nearly 34% between 2017 and 2023. Current concerns about the COVID-19 virus being shared through cash have many businesses and media outlets urging consumers to increase their use of contactless payment methods. Credit unions should be prepared with a good understanding of these newer forms of payment options so they can stay ahead of the curve.What are Contactless Payment Options?A variety of contactless payment methods are competing for adoption in the U.S. These include:Contactless cards using near-field communication (NFC) technologyPayments through mobile appsA combination of bothCredit unions interested in joining the market have a few options.Invest in their own mobile payment apps with the help of their payment processing partners. Leave members to attach cards to their phones’ native digital wallets. Work with their payment processing partners to offer contactless NFC technology on current physical cards.What Are Current Consumer Attitudes?Consumer attitudes toward contactless payments are diverse, even among users. Below are some reasons behind both their use and lack of adoption. Reasons for current and future use include:Contactless cards are faster, particularly for smaller transactions (U.S. News)Mobile payments are a convenient all-in-one option for smartphone users.COVID-19 is now a factor as more people and businesses are becoming conscious of viruses and germs. Factors that hinder adoption are:Consumer questions about the security of these methods, particularly mobile payments. Pew Research shows 38% of people see mobile payments as having low security. Hold-outs are satisfied with their current payment methods and rewards programs and see no compelling reason to change. (Pew Research). What Can Credit Unions Do?Credit unions can know their strengths. Good relationships with members give credit unions a strong starting place to offer contactless payment methods. Stay ahead of the curve. Credit unions should talk to their processors if they are not offering contactless cards.  Enable tokenization for their cards on apps like ApplePay, Samsung Pay, and GooglePay. Communicate with members.  Clearly informing members about the benefits and protections they can expect with contactless payment methods brings value to members and credit unions. It can help put credit unions at the top of members’ minds when they consider contactless payment options. Contactless methods are important to the future of credit union service. While mobile options will add costs for credit unions, many people are already glued to their phones while shopping, making these options quite relevant. This is particularly true for younger adults who make up 74% of mobile payment users according to Pew.With so many options and attitudes toward contactless payment methods out there, staying ahead of the curve can be difficult. Yet, remaining informed, helping members stay informed, and working to become a provider of these methods can give credit unions an edge as the contactless payment market continues to rise.last_img read more

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TRAFFIC ALERT: Disabled bus slows traffic on 201 Bridge

first_imgOther buses have been sent to help pick up the passengers on he disabled bus. JOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — Dispatchers would like to alert motorists to traffic delays out of Johnson City Wednesday afternoon. For the most up to date information, go to 511NY’s website by clicking here. Johnson City Police are on the scene. Dispatchers have told 12 News that a Serafini bus became disabled on the 201 bridge.last_img

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UK: H5N1 outbreak may be linked to wild birds, lax biosecurity

first_imgNov 29, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The initial epidemiologic report, released today, on the United Kingdom’s recent outbreaks of H5N1 avian influenza in Suffolk said the source of the virus is unknown but could have been wild birds.The 24-page report from the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), released on the department’s Web site, said the H5N1 virus infected poultry at the Redgrave Farm facility near Diss, then was transmitted by vehicles, people, or other means to a second farm owned by the same company.The outbreak was confirmed at the first farm on Nov 13 and at the second farm 6 days later, according to previous reports.Investigators have so far ruled out the possibility that infected poultry or poultry products, or the vehicles or people transporting them from other counties, played a role in spreading the virus to the commercial farm, which housed turkeys, ducks, and geese.”Wild birds cannot be ruled out as a source of infection,” DEFRA said in a press release today. “To date, there is no evidence of H5N1 infection in the local wild bird population or in GB [Great Britain] as a whole, but the continued surveillance may help clarify the infection status of the wild bird population.”Among other details in the report, most of the infected birds on the first farm were turkeys, but a few ducks were sick as well. The findings suggest an initial introduction of the virus into one of the groups of turkeys, rather than widespread exposure of poultry on the farm.Genetic analysis of virus samples from birds on the two affected farms revealed that the birds were infected from a single source and that the virus most closely resembled an isolate from wild birds from the Czech Republic that was detected in mid 2007, the report said.The isolate is distinct from the one involved in a February H5N1 outbreak at the Bernard Matthews turkey farm in Holton.Samples from poultry on the farms that supplied birds to the two Redgrave Farm facilities tested negative, and all of the birds were hatched in Great Britain, the report said.Investigators identified two key biosecurity concerns. One was that farm workers who traveled between the facilities did not follow simple measures such as changing clothing, disinfecting their boots, and sanitizing the feed buckets they carried to feed birds. Another was that the first affected farm, a free-range facility, was likely to attract not only migratory waterfowl from a nearby ornamental farm but also “bridge” species such as gulls.DEFRA said its surveillance, testing, and epidemiologic work on the outbreak was continuing.See also:Nov 15 CIDRAP News story “H5N1 suspected at second British farm”last_img read more

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Raising the game

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