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Georgia cops kept 13-year-old handcuffed in freezing squad car to get him to talk

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(ROSWELL, Ga.) — Flipping a coin to decide whether to arrest a sobbing woman. Keeping a K-9 on the force after it repeatedly attacked a man despite its handler’s commands. And now, leaving a 13-year-old boy handcuffed in the back of a squad car in freezing conditions and then taunting him.The police department in Roswell, Georgia, has grabbed headlines for the third time this year after body camera footage surfaced that showed an officer trying to “freeze out” a teenager to get information out of him.The officer, Sgt. Daniel Elzey, was placed on paid administrative leave July 19 — six months after the Jan. 2 incident. Questions remain about what appears to be a pattern of inappropriate conduct on the part of the Roswell Police Department.City administrator Gary Palmer wrote on July 25 in a Facebook post, after the body camera footage went public, that the series of incidents would be investigated by outside firms and that the police department would also conduct its own internal investigation.“It is clear to me, the mayor and council and the chief of police that what you are seeing are symptoms of bigger issues; issues that we need to clearly identify and deliberately address as expeditiously as possible,” he said.The police department has not commented on the incident involving the teen.The January body camera footage involving the 13-year-old boy was first obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and then published online by the Roswell police on July 25.In that video, a police officer, identified as C. Dickerson, came across a teen boy driving a golf cart down a highway, according to the report filed by the officer.The boy, who had grass all over his knees and whose sweater sleeves were soaked and frozen, gave Dickerson conflicting answers about where he lived, how he got the golf cart and where his mother was, the report stated.In the video, the officer detained the boy in handcuffs at the back of her police car and as the teen sobbed and said the handcuffs hurt, she tried to get him to tell her about a parent she can release him to.As the night wore on and the officer became more and more frustrated with the boy’s evasiveness — “I’ve had enough. I’ve lost my patience,” she declared at one point — her sergeant, Daniel Elzey, stepped in.He rolled down the windows of the squad car, asked her to join him in his own heated car and instructed the boy to “think on it for a few minutes” in the back of Dickerson’s open car.“Let him get a little chilly. Maybe that’ll help,” he told Dickerson.A little over 10 minutes later, when he went to check on the defiant teen, he told him, “You can take it? Cool. So can I. Because I’ve got heat in this car… If we can make contact with mom, then maybe we can get some heat going.”“He’s freezing him out,” Dickerson explained to another officer out of view of the body camera.In the incident report filed by Dickerson and published online, there is no mention of the use of cold as a coercive tactic on the boy.The boy eventually gave the officers his mother’s contact information, and they left him with her, the report said.Elzey will remain on paid leave pending the outcome of an administrative investigation, police said in a statement.Elzey did not return an immediate request for comment from ABC News.The Roswell Police Department has been in the news for all the wrong reasons recently.Shocking body camera footage from April this year showed police officers flipping a coin to decide whether they would arrest a driver who was pulled over for speeding.As the woman, 24-year-old Sarah Webb, sat sobbing in her car, the officers used a coin toss app in their own car, amidst laughter, and later arrested her.In reaction to criticism over the video, Roswell Police Chief Rusty Grant posted a statement on Facebook on July 13, saying, “I have much higher expectations of our police officers and I am appalled that any law enforcement officer would trivialize the decision making process of something as important as the arrest of a person.”The two officers were fired last week.In another video first published by Atlanta NBC affiliate WXIA on July 18 and then posted online by the police department, a police dog attacked and bit a man who was complying with police orders. Despite being commanded to let go over 20 times, the dog refused to release the man’s arm. The incident took place in August 2016 but the dog was kept on the force, according to the police post.“After this incident occurred, the K-9 was given additional training and has not had any incidents with following commands since the additional training,” the post said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Financial services firm outsources temp recruitment

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Financial services firm outsources temp recruitmentOn 11 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today Prudentialfinancial services has outsourced all its temporary recruitment, claiming thatoutsourcing HR functions has brought greater control, assurance and savings tothe company. SpringGroup Plc has taken over all temporary staffing at Prudential, a move thatfollows the outsourcing of all permanent staffing to AMG.Accordingto Prudential, outsourcing has contributed to a 33 per cent drop in the costbase of HR, and the fall in the number of HR officers from 405 in 2001, to 220in 2003.RussellMartin, HR director at Prudential, said that while part of the HR function hadbeen outsourced, it remained deeply woven into the fabric of the company, withconsultants attending regular briefings and enjoying a very comfortablerelationship with the rest of HR.”Thisis an evolutionary process. We have looked at the whole HR model to create HRbusiness partnerships and HR specialisation,” he said. “Now we can besure we will get staff with the right kind of experience for the right kind ofroles.”Prudentialalready operates an HR system where line managers trained in employee relationsskills are responsible for the well-being of their staff. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Practical steps

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Practical stepsOn 4 Jun 2005 in Personnel Today MARK THOMAS, policy adviser, Unison policy unitThere are some positive moves in the right direction from the government – particularly in the area of parental rights and working time regulations.But the bottom line is that Britain still has the longest working hours in Europe, and there are various areas where we are less optimistic of major change.This includes a variety of issues on individual employment rights in the workplace, as a lot of them have qualifying periods. For instance, there is currently no immediate right to unfair dismissal – you have to be in a job for a certain length of time.Then there’s the issue of protection for agency workers, as they are often drafted in as a cost-cutting measure and subsequently miss out on such things as training opportunities and pension rights. At the same time, agency workers also tend to work in the most vulnerable, low-paid sectors.As the prevalence of agency workers is very high, it is something that really can’t be ignored by the government. However, the UK is currently blocking an EU Agency Workers Directive that’s been designed to ease the situation.So with these and many other areas, we are not very optimistic. There have been small advances in recent years, but in many areas this has been tinkering with the technical details rather than the fundamentals of the system.And while there are plenty of good employers around, there are also plenty of unscrupulous ones. It’s because of them that we need stronger employment rights. After all, what can you currently do about a bad employer?Lewis Sidnick, employment policy adviser, British Chambers of CommerceThe Labour government has a very ambitious flexible working agenda, and this poses a number of potential threats to business.For instance, maternity and paternity extensions, the increase to flexible working in general, the increases in minimum wage and the plans for age discrimination legislation may all have a significant effect.We believe it is vitally important for the government to make sure business doesn’t get harmed by these. However, there’s a significant possibility that the financial burden on employers will increase.The BCC has developed a burden barometer that adds up the total cost of employment regulations on British business. Since the Labour government came into power, there has been an extra 38.9bn in business costs. Around 15bn of this has been employment costs since 1997/1998.So business has already been hit hard by employment regulations such as the minimum wage. While it has been bearable until now, there have been eight increases in the last two years and that’s beginning to bite – quite simply, if you start pushing wages up from the bottom, people who are slightly above want increases too. It is a domino effect throughout industry.The same applies to European legislation, as it has had a big impact on UK businesses. We have to make sure it has a benefit to UK business.Hannah Reed, Senior employment rights officer, TUCThe Labour manifesto included a raft of employment rights that will benefit female workers, in particular.This includes their commitment to extending holiday entitlement to include bank holidays, as it will benefit women more than anyone else.At present we are entitled to four weeks paid annual leave. But through the Working Time Regulations and the Warwick Agreement, the government has already agreed to extend the statutory rights to include bank holidays. This means everyone will be entitled to four weeks and eight days.Our studies suggest that 1.45 million part-time workers will benefit from the measures and most of these will be women in low-paid, unskilled and non-unionised employment.At the same time, the increases in the minimum wage will also benefit female workers more than anyone else.If there’s a 4.1% increase in 2005 it will benefit 1.2 million workers. Possibly as many as two-thirds of these will be women, as around half of the total gainers will be part-timers.Lastly, the potential changes to childcare and paid maternity leave will mean women have more control of their situation.We believe that the best route out of poverty is for women to get into work. But to do that women have to be able to exert some control over their lives at work and home.If the government’s measures are successful this may, for the first time, become reality.David Yeandle, deputy director of employment policy, Engineering Employers FederationThe really big issue is how the regulations surrounding age discrimination are going to be introduced. We already know this has been controversial to date and it has enormous practical difficulties for companies, ranging from recruitment to promotion, pay and benefits structures, pensions, redundancy, unfair dismissal… the practical implications are enormous. And we know that, as it’s a European initiative, it has to be implemented by October 2006.We are still waiting to see the thinking on what way the government will jump over the issues. But it’s almost certain that the redundancy system will change. Whether it’s a change that increases employers costs I don’t know, but it seems likely that many businesses will have to review their redundancy payments.Equally, another important aspect will be pensions. At one stage the government was talking about excluding pensions from the regulations. But there are serious concerns that it may not exempt companies that have closed their final salary scheme to existing members and offered defined contribution arrangements instead.If the government does not exempt these companies, many will have to bite the bullet and close their defined benefit schemes completely as they cannot afford the cost of potential litigation if, five years down the road, they are fined for offering different pension schemes to different groups.last_img read more

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I/Ca in epifaunal benthic foraminifera: A semi-quantitative proxy for bottom water oxygen in a multi-proxy compilation for glacial ocean deoxygenation

first_imgThe decline in dissolved oxygen in global oceans (ocean deoxygenation) is a potential consequence of global warming which may have important impacts on ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystems. Current climate models do not agree on the trajectory of future deoxygenation on different timescales, in part due to uncertainties in the complex, linked effects of changes in ocean circulation, productivity and organic matter respiration. More (semi-)quantitative reconstructions of oceanic oxygen levels over the Pleistocene glacial cycles may provide a critical test of our mechanistic understanding of the response of oceanic oxygenation to climate change. Even the most promising proxies for bottom water oxygen (BWO) have limitations, which calls for new proxy development and a multi-proxy compilation to evaluate glacial ocean oxygenation. We use Holocene benthic foraminifera to explore I/Ca in Cibicidoides spp. as a BWO proxy. We propose that low I/Ca (e.g., 15%) may provide semi-quantitative estimates of low BWO in past oceans (e.g., <∼50 μmol/kg). We present I/Ca records in five cores and a global compilation of multiproxy data, indicating that bottom waters were generally less-oxygenated during glacial periods, with low O2 waters (<∼50 μmol/kg) occupying some parts of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Water mass ventilation and circulation may have been important in deoxygenation of the glacial deep Pacific and South Atlantic, whereas enhanced remineralization of organic matter may have had a greater impact on reducing the oxygen content of the interior Atlantic Ocean.last_img read more

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Cardiology Heart Failure – Clinical Assistant Professor (44495)

first_imgProvide and maintain a high level of quality In-patient andOutpatient care for heart failure patientsActive participation in Cardiovascular Fellowship training inthe heart failure and clinical general cardiology areaProvide clinical teaching of trainees in Cardiology andparticipate in Cardiology educational programDevelop and sustain a heart failure research program. Work withmedical Director of Research and Research Administrator to initiateheart failure research studies as well as seek out appropriateresearch protocols for heart failure. The Cardiovascular Center at the University of Florida College ofMedicine -Jacksonville seeks a fulltime Heart Failure Cardiologistat the non-tenure accruing position at the rank of AssistantProfessor. Responsibilities include: The University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is thelargest of the three UF colleges – medicine, nursing and pharmacy -located on the approximately 110-acre UF HealthJacksonville campus. The college’s 16 clinicalscience departments house more than 400 faculty members and 300residents and fellows. The college offers 32 accredited graduatemedical education programs. In addition to graduate medicaleducation, clinical rotations in all the major disciplines areprovided for students from the UF College of Medicine inGainesville.For practicing physicians, the college offers a continuing medicaleducation program that recruits national and international speakerswho are well known and respected in their fields. The campus’faculty, residents and fellows are active in clinical research.Residents and fellows regularly present their findings at locationsacross the country and publish their projects in well-knownpublications.Residents in Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia are offeredall the benefits of an academic health center by combining ourstrengths with that of the UF Health Jacksonville. Together, theUniversity of Florida Health Science Center–Jacksonville and UFHealth Jacksonville form the region’s premier academic healthcenter–UF Health, a leader in the education of healthprofessionals, a hub for clinical research and a unique provider ofhigh-quality patient care.With more than 5,000 faculty and staff, the academic health centerin Jacksonville is the largest UF campus outside of Gainesville,offering nearly 100 specialty services, including: Cancer services;Cardiovascular; Neuroscience; Orthopaedic; Pediatrics; PoisonCenter; Trauma and Critical Care; and Women and Families services.At 37 clinical sites throughout Northeast Florida, UF physicianstally more than 600,000 outpatient visits and more than 34,000inpatient admissions annually.Located in North Jacksonville is UF Health North, the onlyfull-service hospital in North Jacksonville. The state-of-the-arthospital at UF Health North offers conveniently located,high-quality health care to patients across Northeast Florida andSoutheast Georgia. It offers a wide range of inpatient andoutpatient services unavailable anywhere else in NorthJacksonville, provided by UF Health and community physicians. Thehospital features all-private rooms, which studies show promotehealing and improve the patient experience. Patient engagementtechnology in patient suites allows for easy meal ordering, TVcontrol and access to nurses. The hospital is adjacent to theexisting medical office building, where UF Health providers offermore than 20 specialties, including pediatrics and women’s healthservices. The campus is located on Max Leggett Parkway close toJacksonville International Airport, approximately 15 minutes fromNassau County and less than 30 minutes from Georgia. For moreinformation, visit http://north.ufhealthjax.org/.Located on Florida’s First Coast, Jacksonville is one of thelargest cities in land area in the United States. The city providesan eclectic combination of southern hospitality, business andrecreational paradise. More than 1 million people live in thefive-county area known as Florida’s First Coast. The area offerssomething for everyone, with a temperate climate incorporatingseasonal changes, miles of beautiful waterways and beaches, and amyriad of public facilities for work and play.Candidates must have MD/DO, BC/BE in Cardiology with high interestand expertise in heart failure. Must be able to obtain a FloridaMedical License.Review of applications will start on March 12, 2019 andapplications will be accepted until the positions is filled. Pleaseupload Cover Letter and CV with application.The final candidate will be required to provide official transcriptto the hiring department upon hire. A transcript will not beconsidered “official” if a designation of “Issued to Student” isvisible. Degrees earned from an education institution outside ofthe United States are required to be evaluated by a professionalcredentialing service provider approved by National Association ofCredential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found athttp://www.naces.org/If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.#medicine=35The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

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Hall footballers to meet Worcester in final

first_imgSt. Edmund Hall 2 – 2 Lady Margaret Hall (St. Edmund Hall won on penalties)St. Catherine’s 0 – 5 Worcester Talismanic goalkeeper Nicola Ielpo once again took Teddy Hall to victory as they sneaked into the Cuppers final, courtesy of a penalty shoot-out victory against LMH on Friday. LMH will certainly feel hard done by after outplaying Hall for large chunks of this absorbing encounter. In a game that at times lacked quality, they acquitted themselves admirably, twice taking the lead against Hall, only to be pegged back both times, with defensive lapses costing them dear. The dogged Hall side, who have won three out of their last four Cuppers matches on penalty shoot-outs, will now face top of the table Worcester at Iffley road in Cuppers Final in 8th week. LMH entered the game at the top of Division 1, but with the addition of several University players, they looked more than capable of causing an upset to a Teddy Hall side that has gone from strength to strength in the JCR premiership, unbeaten in all competitions since November. It was LMH who made all the early running, taking a deserved lead after twenty minutes of unrelenting pressure. Their giant centre-back rose unmarked at a corner to clatter a header against the bar, and striker Wheeler reacted fastest to nod the ball into the net. Hall’s response was immediate; a slip from the LMH left-back let in Talbot-Smith who took the keeper by surprise, arrowing in off the far post. Despite these two early goals, both sides struggled to settle, with misplaced passes and snatched half chances epitomising the rest of the first half. Talbot-Smith again found room in the LMH penalty area, but his snapshot clipped the post on its way wide; while LMH’s dominance at set pieces was yielding results as Ielpo was kept on his toes throughout. In the second half Tom Wherry’s dominance in the air for LMH, coupled with the tricky wingplay of McCrickerd and Allchin, meant that Teddy Hall at times found themselves penned in their own half, with Wilfred Frost looking increasingly isolated up front. A goal seemed imminent and the right foot of Allchin provided it. His composed finish with twenty minutes remaining would have killed off most sides, but Captain John Waldron has instilled a ‘never say die’ attitude in this Hall team, and yet again, when asked the question, their response was swift. Mike Sopp’s through-ball released Talbot-Smith marauding down the right hand side. His cross looked to be too close to goalkeeper Di Capite, but Wilfred Frost’s ‘old fashioned’ challenge caused havoc and in the ensuing melee Frost bundled it over the line to draw the teams level once more. The game was now thrown wide open. Heroic last ditch tackling from Waldron and Lefanu kept the LMH front line at bay, while at the other end a deflected cross from the mercurial Mike Sopp trickled agonisingly wide, with the keeper beaten as time expired. 120 minutes could not separate the sides, and so it went to the agony of a penalty shoot-out. Italian ex-Serie C keeper Nicola Ielpo has an outstanding record in penalty shootouts, and despite picking up an injury in the second half, he saved two LMH spot kicks, to the relief of Hall captain Waldron after his pathetic excuse for a penalty. The enigmatic Talbot-Smith then stepped up to nonchalantly stroke the decisive penalty home, to send Teddy Hall into the final. In the other semi-final, Premiership title contenders Worcester had a comfortable 5-0 victory over St Catz. Blues striker Niko de Walden had effectivley guaranteed the victory for the Premier Division giants within the first twenty minutes with two goals. Kunal Desai added a third on the stroke of half time. Two second half goals from Tim Grady and Danny Plaxton added further gloss to the scoreline, but a young Catz side will be all the better for the experience of competing at such a level as they seek to build for next season in the Premier Division.by Ben Cosseylast_img read more

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Get The Led Out Provides a Familiar Soundtrack to Another Ocean City Summer

first_imgby Matt KoellingIt’s still only June. Some kids aren’t finished school yet. But on the Ocean City boardwalk, summer is already in full swing. In this third season covering the Summer Concert Series for OCNJ Daily, show nights at Ocean City Music Pier feature familiar summer faces: Ellen manning the Information Desk, a plethora of returning seasonal staff at the box office and security, plus the omnipresence of the Bill Graham of South Jersey, veteran show promoter Bob Rose. Another familiar sight gracing the stage Monday and Tuesday night was Get The Led Out. The Delaware Valley-bred Led Zeppelin sextet are the best tribute band working. Packing the Pier for a pair of shows each summer is testament to that.The crowd appeared split evenly between those seeing GTLO for the first time and return customers. As singer Paul Sinclair explained the first time he spoke to OCNJ Daily, the goal is to lovingly replicate the Led Zeppelin records generations of rock fans grew up cherishing. “The world is conditioned to hearing those songs the way they have heard them on classic rock radio, or on the albums they’ve owned since they were young”, says Sinclair.  He and guitarists Paul Hammond and Phil D’Agostino, bassist Jimmy Marchiano, keyboardist Eddie Kurek, and drummer Adam Ferraioli, give the people what they want.Paul Sinclair (left) and Paul Hammond (right)A new wrinkle in the 2018 Ocean City Music Pier crowd was the Super Bowl Champion Eagle swag many patrons were sporting. The band, locals themselves, probably didn’t mind hearing a few “E-A-G-L-E-S” chants before the show, even in between songs early in the set. Get The Led Out was here performing the soundtrack to their tailgate. The attention to detail stopping on a dime for “The Lemon Song” break, or Sinclair nailing the high-end on “Hey Hey What Can I Do”, allows the audience to remain in step. The band and crowd know what’s coming next. Led Zeppelin’s live output (The Song Remains the Same, How the West Was Won), for better or worse, drifted from that blueprint.Paul Sinclair (foreground) and Adam Ferraioli (background)The set list changes by Sinclair’s estimation, “60% night to night”. Without crunching the numbers, that feels accurate compared to their last visit. There’s a few staples you can expect in every GTLO show. You can count on a three-song encore, with the final two being “Stairway to Heaven” and “Whole Lotta Love”. Keyboardist Eddie Kurek getting a chance to flex on “No Quarter” is a safe bet. So is “Going to California” opening a mid-show acoustic set. Towards the set close, you will find yourself moving through “Kashmir”. The rest is anybody’s guess, while only the band is privy to that selection process.Eddie KurekWas opening Monday night’s show with “The Immigrant Song” purposefully coinciding with a topic currently inescapable in the news? Or is that propulsive “Hammer of the Gods” stomp just an ideal way to kick off a set? Who’s to say. But since many Zeppelin songs have titles that don’t seemingly correspond to the lyrics, it’s probably best not to assign additional subtext. The music of Led Zep is more about sonics than content. It’s the contrast of power and delicacy, from song to song, sometimes within the same one. A perfect example highlighted in last night’s set would be “Ramble On”. The band segued seamlessly from the bluebird lilt of the verse, to the driving crunch of its chorus.The audience ranged from high school kids born twenty years after Led Zeppelin broke up, to people who were in high school during the band’s peak. Mainland Class of ’77 grad and lifelong Ventnor resident Linda Wray is in the latter demographic. “I’ve been collecting Zeppelin vinyl since I was 14 years old, but I was too focused on school when I was young to get to a show”, she explains. That dedication to her studies would eventually earn her a Master’s Degree in Journalism. But by the time school was done, so was Led Zeppelin. Get The Led Out, forty years later, helped to fill in that gap for her. “This was my first time seeing anything Led Zeppelin-related, and I felt like they resurrected the records I used to play in my bedroom every night back then” gushed Wray.Regina Dinotel (left) and Linda Wray (right)Wray’s companion was her best friend since both entered as freshman, Mainland Class of ’77 grad Regina Dinotel. While Wray’s commentary came post-show, Dinotel’s enthusiasm was visibly palpable from the first song. There were multiple people dancing by the doors on either side of the venue, but Dinotel made by far the most noticeable boogie in the building. Late in the show, once the opening chug of “Bring It On Home” arrived, Dinotel’s train was traveling to the middle of the venue’s track. Some in the neighboring seats, along with Music Pier security, took issue with that. It was a difference of opinion that eventually resulted in her being escorted to the exits before the performance ended.Phil D’Agostino (left) and Paul Hammond (right)Shadowing crowd activity while taking in the action onstage, it seemed like a good time to be a buffer after a nearby Ocean City police officer entered the discussion. Cooler heads prevailed with some space between, once Dinotel left the pier for the beach, where Wray rejoined her following the set closer. “I had a great time. I understand where security was coming from if I was blocking anyone’s view”, Dinotel explained while outside as the encore could be heard faintly from the beach, “but in the moment I didn’t appreciate being reprimanded for dancing. I’m a Deadhead since the seventies. I love to dance, it’s my favorite form of exercise. And this band made me wanna dance all night long”.Paul HammondAs guitar virtuoso Paul Hammond was literally wrapping Get The Led Out’s show with a bow on “Whole Lotta Love”, a young girl named Elle was one of the kids out of school for the summer. Elle was on the boardwalk with a microphone, giving a performance of her own. While in the fall she’ll move onto fourth grade, she’s thinking about the big picture. Elle has approximately 15-20 of the greatest inspirational speeches in American history committed to memory. She will recite any one of them upon boardwalk passerby request. Satisfied customers can donate into a homemade tip-jar she labeled “college fund”.Enterprising Orator Young ElleAs Elle stood outside perfectly reciting Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, you could hear drummer Adam Ferraioli’s last cymbal crash inside at the same time Elle was reaching the crescendo of “Free at Last”.  Applause erupted in the venue and broke out on the boardwalk. A few new college fund donations were made. Smiles abounded in both places. It’s summertime in Ocean City. Like Paul Sinclair exclaimed onstage during Get The Led Out’s set, “you know the words, so sing along with me”.last_img read more

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Hovis reveals TV ad details

first_imgHovis has revealed more details on its major TV campaign, which will be shown for the first time this Friday, 12 September.The ad, which was filmed in Liverpool with a cast of more than 750 extras, depicts the highs and lows experienced by Britain during Hovis’ existence. The epic ad will cover World War 1, the suffragette movement, the first car, World War 2, the 1953 coronation and the “swinging sixties”, right up to the Millennium celebrations. It ends with the strapline ‘As good today as it’s always been’.The ad is the major part of parent company Premier Food’s plan to rejuvenate the Hovis brand. It will break with a 122-second spot during Coronation Street on Friday, to reflect the brand’s launch 122 years ago. Shorter 90 and 10-second versions will run until December. A four-week cinema campaign, press and in-store activity will support the campaign.Last week, Hovis’ marketing director Jon Goldstone told British Baker that the aim of the campaign was to “put real pride back into the fantastic Hovis brand”.last_img read more

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Registration open for St. Joseph County Parks “Outdoor Adventures” camps

first_img Previous articleUSPS taking steps to protect customers, workers during pandemicNext articleUWSM asking for volunteers, donations to help combat coronavirus Brooklyne Beatty Google+ Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Registration open for St. Joseph County Parks “Outdoor Adventures” camps IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market TAGSCampsCounty ParksOutdoor AdventuresSt. Joseph CountySummer Nature (Photo Supplied/St. Joseph County Parks) You can now register for St. Joseph County Parks’ “Outdoor Adventures” Summer Nature Camps.The camps are held at St. Patrick’s County Park, and are offered for children entering kindergarten through 8th grade.The camp schedule is as follows:June 22-26: Big Kid Nature Camp (ages 10 -11)June 29: Mountain Biking (ages 11-14)July 1: Tree Top Adventure (ages 11-14)July 6-10: Animal Safari (ages 6-7)July 13-17: Mud Monsters (ages 5-6)July 20-July 24: Outdoor Artists (8-9)For more information, or to request registration materials, call (574) 654-3155 or click here.center_img By Brooklyne Beatty – April 10, 2020 0 293 Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

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Off Road Legends: A Conversation with Eastern Mountain Bike Legend Matt Marcus

first_imgOff Road Legends: A conversation with Matt MarcusMatt Marcus has been mountain biking since before they called it mountain biking. Right now, He’s is 600 miles into a bike adventure down the East Coast to the Florida Keys. He’s not counting on getting there until he’s there. After a long day’s ride, he called in to talk about his life and his favorite sport.“When Matt was really into mountain biking and early days of the scene, there was no internet. He lived it, but didn’t blog about it. His memory is really good and he has the mind of a great trial lawyer,” said fellow old-school Blue Ridge mountain bike legend Susan Haywood, of Marcus. “I would describe him as an early pioneer of East Coast mountain biking and racing. He lived in the D. C. area and worked as a bicycle messenger. He would travel every weekend to races or to ride in Canaan on the tough stuff. He was a weekend warrior that finally made the leap to move to Canaan. He eventually bought Blackwater Bikes in Davis and was the face of mountain biking in Canaan for many years.”Continued Haywood: “He was involved in WVMBA ( West Virginia Mountain Bike Association) and IMBA( International Mountain Bike Association) and was a strong advocate for trail access, especially at a time when trails were getting shut down. He wasn’t always the diplomat in these situations, but his strong passion for trails dictated his actions. And even though he was sometimes on the extreme end of the spectrum, it was what was needed to save trails.”BRO: What did you do before you discovered mountain biking?MM: I was a bike messenger in D.C. That’s when I first saw mountain bikes sold commercially—at a bike shop in Gerogetown. Another bike messenger had a Stumpjumper—one of the first mountain bikes that ever came out. My buddy was more of a BMX rider and I was a road rider at the time. We both got into it heavily. He ended up being a pro. He was really fast.I started racing up in West Virginia and ended up moving there in 1988. I bought Blackwater Bikes in 1990. Owned it for ten years. I worked there before I owned it and I’ve worked there on and off since I sold it. I might end up working there again.BRO: Coming from an urban/road biking background what attracted you to mountain biking?MM: Being able to ride in the woods on trails and up steep hills was alluring. My friend and I got into the mountain bike scene together. It was fun going to races with him because he would win a lot. Davis, West Virginia, was the first place we went to race truly gnarly off-road stuff. People would come from Georgia, New York, parts of New England, and Florida—all over the East coast.The first race I rode was in Rock Creek Park before they outlawed biking there. But it was pretty sketchy. It was an off-road bike messenger race so it was pretty funny.The first real mountain bike race I entered was 1984, The Canaan Mountain Series in Davis, WV. Laird Knight was the race promoter and started it in 1983. We were going through rivers and swamps. It was serious, hardcore, sick downhill stuff. You could probably ride it now on a downhill bike but then it was sketchy on a rigid bike. We rode everything rigid then. There was not much suspension at the time. The Canaan Mountain Series is one of the oldest continuously run mountain bike race in the world, definitely the oldest and longest still running on the east coast.BRO: If you could have an on-going theme song while you biked, what would it be?MM: “Jumping in the fire” by Harry Nilsson. That’s been running in my head all day.BRO: What was your first mountain bike?MM: Univega Alpina 1983 model.BRO: Do you have a name for your mountain bike?MM: (Laughs) no, I mean it’s named Cannondale Scalpel. Some people do though.BRO: What has been your proudest moment in the sport?MM: When my friend Nick Wait won the Junior National Championship in 2001 (fc). Another was when Sue Haywood got chose to represent the U.S. in the Olympics. It was a proud moment though it later went to court and she got it yanked from her. Watch the movie called off-road To Athens. It’s a big part of mountain bike history. It would take a whole other interview to tell you that one, buddy. Those are the two moments I’m most proud of because I was involved with both those athletes in terms of riding with them and getting them started in the sport.BRO: Is the sport worth the risk/danger?Well of course, yes, it’s worth the risk/danger. There are plenty of other things that are a hell of a lot more dangerous and people do them all the time. High School football; driving to Walmart is probably more dangerous than mountain biking.On this trip I’m on now, I left Durham, NC and hit part of the East coast greenway. It’s a 20-30 mile long rail trail and I never had to worry about my safety in terms of cars or trucks or anything. Those are the kinds of facilities that would be nice to have. If there were a cross-country rail trail, I would be on it in a heartbeat. Those are the kind of facilities that would make the sport of cycling stronger, in general.BRO: Where is your favorite place to ride a mountain bike in the U.S.?MM: West Virginia is what I’m most familiar with. Davis and Canaan Valley, that area. I love one of the newer trails in the area called Splash Dam. North/Central West Virginia is rocky, rooty, muddy, plateau. Its not as friendly to beginners. It’s more hardcore technical and rocky.Other place I’ve been that I love to ride? Moab, obviously, and there are some other really cool places around there. Gooseberry and Fruita. Steamboat Springs in Colorado is really great, too. There’s some really awesome riding down in Central and South America. I want to go to Guatemala. I did the death road in Bolivia…It’s not a mountain bike ride but it’s really cool. It starts at something like 16,000 ft. and ends at something like 2,000 feet.BRO: Can you tell me about the moonshiners?MM: Back when I owned the bike shop in the 90s, I came across this story on this sheet of paper about how back in the 1920s during Prohibition moonshiners made these bicycles with gearing that they used to run the moonshine over the mountains from Dryfork, W.V., in Randolph County. That’s the story and if I ever find it again I’ll send it to you. I don’t even know where it came from.But it wasn’t one group. Hundreds of people all over the world discovered mountain biking. It was just the guys out in California that finally took it to production. They’re the ones who pulled it off. It seems like there are more bike shops in California and Florida than anywhere else in the U.S. and its because of the climate and terrain.BRO: Where do you see the future of the sport going?MM: I think mountain biking has matured to the point where the technology is not going to go as fast anymore, maybe. But who knows because there’s always new stuff the manufacturers want to build. First there were 26in wheels then 29in and 650b and now people are riding these fat bikes in snow and sand. The sports going to keep evolving and changing and people will always want new and better gear. I don’t know where the future is going. All I know is the bicycle is one of the greatest inventions that man has ever made and it’s not going away.BRO: Why do you love mountain biking more than road biking?MM: Okay, this is basically the reason why I love mountain biking: if you screw up its your fault. It’s not a car’s fault. Your not in some road race with a sprinting pack that’s going to crash. Nine times out of ten if you wreck on a mountain bike, it is your own fault. All the responsibility rests on you but you also don’t have to worry about somebody else screwing you up, usually. It’s as safe as you want it to be. Its individual…But a friend of mine—a bear hit him. So you know, shit happens. The bear got up and shook it off. My buddy may have had some cracked ribs. I can’t remember the details but he definitely got hit by a bear or they hit each other. They were both going along pretty fast.last_img read more