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Celebrate Bob Dylan’s 75th Birthday With His Best Moments & Tributes

first_imgHappy 75th Birthday Bob Dylan! Possibly the greatest poet to come out of the 60s, Dylan is our most revered contemporary songwriter. His incredible catalog represents some of the most important work in the history of Folk, Americana, and Rock music. Classics tunes such as “All Along The Watchtower”, “Like A Rolling Stone”, “Maggie’s Farm”, “Tangled up in Blue”, and “I Shall Be Released” are just a small piece of the puzzle, as Dylan released several legendary and influential albums like Blood on the Tracks, Blonde on Blonde, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, and Highway 61 Revisited.Famous for “going electric” at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, Dylan is credited with bringing contemporary Folk music into the Rock era, weaving his politically-charged lyrics with the exciting live musicianship that we’ve come to expect from concerts today. By doing so, Dylan essentially merged the worlds of Folk and Rock that encouraged the musical counter-culture movement of the late 60’s.Dylan’s acceptance of “plugged in” instruments (and subsequent hiring of The Band as his “electric” band) inspired a generation of musicians to explore the medium, and he heavily influenced artists like The Grateful Dead, Neil Young, and Jimi Hendrix (among countless others) to plug in and explore their instruments and songs in new, groundbreaking ways. On top of all that (as the story goes), he even maybe-sort-of introduced The Beatles to the joys of marijuana! Without Bob Dylan, we might have never heard Jerry Garcia play one of his beautiful guitar solos on an electric guitar, The Beatles might have never been introduced to their psychedelic side, and The Band may have never made their way into the public eye. It’s truly amazing to consider how massive Bob Dylan’s influence has been to the world of music and the culture that surrounds it!To celebrate this legendary artist’s 75th birthday, check out some great footage of the man himself performing some of his best songs over the years, along with a few of his most fun collaborations, and some very impressive covers performed by an eclectic range of artists. Enjoy the videos below, and happy birthday Bob!“Mr. Tambourine Man” at Newport Folk Festival in 1964.“Maggie’s Farm” opening the first-ever electric set at Newport Folk Festival, performed by Bob Dylan in 1965 (note the heavy booing by angry folk music fans at the end!).Bob Dylan and The Band perform “Forever Young” during The Last Waltz.26 minutes of Bob Dylan with The Grateful Dead from Giants Stadium 7/12/1987 during their “Alone and Together” mini-tour.In the late 80’s, Bob Dylan was part of a super-group called the Travelling Wilburys with George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, and Tom Petty. While the band never toured together, here’s a music video of their hit song “Handle With Care.”Famed producer T. Bone Burnett organized these incredible contemporary songwriters to complete unfinished songs from Dylan’s Basement Tapes era with The Band. This modern supergroup, dubbed The New Basement Tapes, includes Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Marcus Mumford of Mumford and Sons, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, Rhiannon Giddens, and Elvis Costello. This video below captures Mumford singing the beautiful “Kansas City”, with special guest Johnny Depp filling in for Costello on guitar.Here’s some audio of the great Johnny Cash performing Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” at Newport Folk Festival in 1964Dave Matthews Band has been covering Dylan’s incredible “All Along The Watchtower” for years. Check out this version from their Live in Central Park.Guns n’ Roses turned “Knockin on Heaven’s Door” into an arena rock anthem on Use Your Illusion II. Watch them perform the seminal song at Rock In Rio festival 1991.How does it feel?last_img read more

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Class of 2014 Convocation

first_imgHarvard’s leaders welcomed the Class of 2014 Tuesday (Aug. 31), in a convocation ceremony filled with pomp and circumstance. They urged the new students to use their College years as a time to experiment, learn, and discover.last_img

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Fakhri A. Bazzaz

first_imgFakhri A. Bazzaz, H. H. Timkin Professor of Science from 1984 to 1997 and then Mallinckodt Professor of Biology from 1997 until his retirement in 2004, passed away on February 6, 2008, of complications following a stroke.  A giant in the field of plant ecology, Bazzaz transformed the study of plant population biology through his deep knowledge of plant physiology.  The dominant theme throughout his career was that of how plants respond to natural and anthropogenic disturbance, from the classical area of plant succession—how plant communities succeed one another over time—to the impacts of global climate change on the productivity and stability of ecosystems.  Bazzaz’s landmark studies of old-field succession broke with the descriptive paradigm that dominated mid-twentieth century plant ecology and established a modern experimental approach grounded in mechanistic understanding of plant physiology and community interactions.  He played an equally important role in the study of climate change, conducting far-reaching work on the mechanisms by which plants, plant communities, and ecosystems respond to elevated carbon dioxide and other global change factors such as increases in temperature and nitrogen deposition.  Bazzaz was invited by Vice-President (then Senator) Al Gore to testify before Congress in 1992, and he was a signatory of a scientific letter to President Clinton in 1997, advising serious and careful attention to global climate change.  His long and productive career is recorded in nearly 300 scientific papers, 18 book chapters, and 6 books, while his lasting impact on the field of ecology is reflected in the careers of his 56 graduate students, 36 postdoctoral fellows, and 17 undergraduate research students.Fakhri Bazzaz was born in Baghdad, Iraq, on June 16, 1933, to a family prominent in public service.  He studied biology at Baghdad University, obtaining his undergraduate degree in 1953.  An Iraqi government scholarship for postgraduate study allowed him to complete both his M.Sc. (1960) and Ph.D. (1963) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, under the supervision of Professor Lawrence Bliss.  After two years as a Lecturer at Baghdad University, he returned to an assistant professor position at the University of Illinois, rising through the ranks to full professor, head of the department of plant biology, and acting director of the School of Life Sciences.The agricultural landscape of central Illinois, with its patchwork of abandoned fields, formed a natural laboratory in which Bazzaz first made his mark on ecology.  As such “old fields” give way to increasingly taller and more perennial vegetation, Bazzaz recognized that the process of species replacement was governed by the life history characteristics of individual species.  In doing so, he transformed what had been a purely phenomenological line of inquiry into a predictive, hypothesis-driven science.  Bazzaz used field, glasshouse, and laboratory experiments to test hypotheses of how the underlying mechanisms by which plants compete for resources influence community interactions.  Bazzaz was the first to understand that plasticity is itself a trait under selection and to study how variation in allocation to roots, leaves, and especially reproductive structures influences competitive interactions.  His infusion of physiological mechanism into plant population biology and his insistence on integrating the entire plant life cycle—from germination through to seed production—placed him at the vanguard of the nascent field of plant physiological ecology.Bazzaz’s move to Harvard University in 1984 coincided with an increasing focus on the study of climate change.  He was among the first ecologists to recognize not only the significance of such anthropogenic impacts on natural ecosystems, but also their complexity.  While other scientists were content to document the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on the growth of individual plants, Bazzaz realized that climate change had the potential to alter interactions between species and even to decrease plant diversity.  He documented how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations could have far-reaching impacts on ecological communities due to differential effects on the reproductive allocation of plants and the altered nutritional quality of plant tissues.  In particular, Bazzaz’s research showed how the effects of climate change on plants could cascade through the food chain, affecting communities of pollinators and herbivores with important consequences for human health.  He recognized the need to study interactions between rising carbon dioxide concentrations and other aspects of global change such as nitrogen deposition and increases in temperature.  He spoke eloquently and with great fervor about the dangers of climate change.  Bazzaz’s contributions to humanity are reflected in his scientific work, which lays bare the potential impacts of climate change on plant communities and the consequences for human well-being of failing to respond to such a serious and self-induced threat.Bazzaz was an energetic and dedicated teacher, who inspired a generation of young ecologists.  His commitment to students was reflected in the tightly organized and effective lab group that was the hallmark of his leadership style.  He took immense pride in his students’ success, both personal and professional, and considered their continued work an important part of his legacy.Throughout his career, Fakhri Bazzaz received many honors, including election as a Fellow of Clare Hall of Cambridge University (1981), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1987), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1989), and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (1993).  He was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1988, the Humboldt Forschungspreis in 1996, and the Desert Research Institute’s “Nevada Medal” in 2004.  Bazzaz received a founding membership in the Iraqi National Academy of Science in 2003, and he helped found the Arab Science and Technology Foundation and served on its Advisory Board.  He is survived by his wife of nearly 50 years, Maarib Bakri Bazzaz, his daughter Sahar Bazzaz of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his son Ammar Bazzaz of Chino, California.Respectfully submitted,David R. FosterAndrew H. KnollJames J. McCarthyDonald H. PfisterN. Michele Holbrook, Chairlast_img read more

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U.S. announces restoration of relations with Palestinians

first_imgUNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration is announcing a restoration of relations with the Palestinians and a renewal of aid to Palestinian refugees. The announcement by acting U.S. ambassador Richard Mills is a reversal of the Trump administration’s cutoff of aid to the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees. Mills told the U.N. Security Council this reengagement with the Palestinians is key to the Biden administration’s support for a two-state solution to the decades-old conflict agreed to by Israelis and Palestinians. He said Biden hopes to start working slowly to build confidence on both sides toward Israeli-Palestinian peace.last_img

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ND School of Architecture awards Manzano Prize

first_imgAustralian-born architect Donald Gray has been named the 2015 recipient of the Rafael Manzano Martos Prize for Classical Architecture and Monument Restoration, an annual award presented by the Notre Dame School of Architecture and the Richard H. Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust.According to a Notre Dame press release, Gray is a Spanish citizen and works out of La Alpujarra. Some of his notable architectural work includes the Urbanización La Virginia in Marbella, Spain; Las Lomas del Marbella Club, a city hall in Pitres, Spain; and the Hotel La Tartana in Granada, Spain. According to a separate release from the Notre Dame School of Architecture, his work is generally referenced as the “Marbella architectural ensembles” and has contributed greatly to “the enrichment and recovery of Andalusian architecture.”“Donald Gray began his career at a time when appreciation for traditional building was at one of the lowest points, and he has succeeded in creating new spaces that inspire and celebrate the traditions of how we live together and how we build,” Michael Lykoudis, the Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of Architecture, said. “His story is one of heroism as he persevered undaunted by the popular infatuation with the avant-garde and the often castigating eye of the architectural establishment.”According to the press release, the Manzano Prize honors architects “who defend and preserve vernacular architecture and reinforce Spain’s architectural heritage.” Architects “of any nationality, who submit works that respect the landscape and urbanism of Spanish cities, can be candidates for” the prize. The award is named in honor of Rafael Manzano Martos, a Cadiz-born architect who spent his career working towards “the preservation of the architectural and urban heritage of Spain through both the restoration and design of new architecture based on this heritage.”The origins of the Manzano Prize formed in 2010, when Manzano received the Richard H. Driehaus Prize from Notre Dame and met with Driehaus in Chicago. Dreihaus, according to the press release, was named by Barron’s magazine as one of the top 25 influential financiers of the twentieth century. He has been named an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando “in recognition of his work to preserve the Spanish heritage and his outstanding patronage.” He is the eighth recipient of that title and the first U.S. citizen to receive the honor.According to the press release, Gray will receive 50,000 euros in award money and a medal during the prize ceremony, which will take place on Oct. 28 in Madrid. The Manzano prize is known as “the most generous in Spain in terms of its prize money.” Additionally, the prize establishes a two-day seminar to be held at a later time. This year’s seminar, “Architecture and Humanism,” directly addressed architects and encouraged them to use their occupation as a means of enhancing the quality of life for those they serve, a relevant theme in light of Pope Francis’ recent encyclical, “Laudato Si.”“The ceremony will be held at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando,” MaryBeth Zachariades, communications program director for Notre Dame’s School of Architecture, said. “The ceremony will include remarks from prize juror and [Notre Dame] alumna Melissa DelVecchio, on behalf of Dean Michael Lykoudis, juror Léon Krier, Richard Driehaus and Donald Gray.”“As a classical architecture school devoted to the idea of humanism, we believe in and teach the enduring values that traditional architecture and urbanism embody,” Lykoudis said. “Mr. Gray has made an extraordinary contribution to the idea of the inseparability of urbanism and architecture. His work embodies the Vitruvian values of beauty, utility and durability — all of which are necessary for the cultivation and sustainability of the built and natural environments.”Tags: Donald Gray, Rafael Manzano Martos Prize, Richard Driehaus, School of Architecture, spanish architecturelast_img read more

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Dominion cancels plans for $200 million, 500MW gas peaking plant in Virginia

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Danville Register & Bee:Dominion Power, which had hoped to invest about $200 million in a power plant at the Southern Virginia Megasite at Berry Hill, has canceled its plans at the site.“We no longer believe it is possible to build the units planned in Pittsylvania County despite the economic and reliability benefits for our customers,” Dominion spokesperson Jeremy L. Slayton wrote in an email to the Danville Register & Bee on Thursday afternoon. “We plan to conduct a further reliability study to determine how best to move forward to maintain the around-the-clock service our customers need.”The 500 megawatt, combustion turbine power plant, which would have been a total investment of more than $200 million, was projected to be the first business at the mega site, located in Pittsylvania County a few miles west of Danville.The power plant — announced in November 2019 — would have been connected to the existing Transco natural gas pipeline that runs through the Berry Hill Megasite. It was to be a peaking station, only to be used during peak times where the renewable energy options can’t keep up with demand.At full power, the plant would have provided enough power for 125,000 homes.[John Crane]More: Dominion pulls plug on power plant plans for Southern Virginia Megasite Dominion cancels plans for $200 million, 500MW gas peaking plant in Virginialast_img read more

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Operation Martillo: Coast Guard Cutter Gallatin returns home

first_imgBy Dialogo June 15, 2012 MIAMI, U.S.A. – The crew of the 378-foot Coast Guard Cutter Gallatin returned to its homeport of Charleston, S.C., on June 7 after successfully taking part in Operation Martillo, a multinational effort to curtail illicit trafficking routes on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. During its 91-day patrol, the Gallatin crew worked to disrupt drug running in the Caribbean Sea and Florida Straits. The Gallatin crew worked alongside members of the Coast Guard Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron based in Jacksonville, Fla. Gallatin crewmembers conducted four law enforcement-related boardings during the course of the cutter’s patrol, including a joint boarding with the Nicaraguan Navy. The 44-year-old Gallatin and 11 other original Secretary-class, high-endurance cutters, are being replaced by eight Legend-class, National Security Cutters (NCS). The NCSs are faster, better equipped and more durable, efficient and safer than their predecessors, according to the Coast Guard. As the Coast Guard’s last Hamilton-class cutter stationed on the East Coast, the Gallatin is the largest and most capable Coast Guard vessel patrolling the Caribbean Sea. The U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy, Customs and Border Protection, and partner nation aircraft and vessel crews work together to conduct counter-narcotics patrols in the Caribbean Sea. Belize, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States are participating in Operation Martillo, which started in mid-January.last_img read more

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Melville Crash Leaves Bicyclist Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 33-year-old Farmingdale man was fatally struck by an SUV while riding a bicycle in Melville over the weekend.Suffolk County police said Bruce Pye was riding his bike eastbound on Old Country Road when he collided with a Chevrolet Tahoe that was making a left onto Tuxedo Drive shortly after 3 p.m.The victim was taken to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow, where he later died.The driver, 48-year-old Salvatore Ceravolo of Melville, was not injured.Second Squad detectives ask anyone with information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8252.last_img

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Credit union loans are heating up

first_imgSummer is well underway and credit union lending—like the weather—is heating up.Credit union loan portfolios are up 2.7% through April and are on track to grow at a double-digit rate in 2016.If that happens, it will be the first time in nearly 30 years that the movement recorded three consecutive years of double-digit gains in loans outstanding.The driving force behind big credit union loan gains will almost certainly be automobile loans. Modest inflation pressures will keep market interest rates low through the end of 2017.That, combined with continuing improvement in labor markets (more hiring and higher wage gains), will buoy consumer confidence and will keep auto sales—both new and used—chugging along for the foreseeable future. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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PREMIUMFertilizer firm makes successful debut in bear stock market

first_imgLinkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social account Fertilizer company PT Saraswanti Anugerah Makmur Tbk received a warm welcome from investors during the company’s debut on the Indonesian stock exchange on Tuesday as most share prices gained ground after a significant fall on the previous day.The shares of Saraswanti Anugerah, listed by Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) under the code SAMF, rose by 35 percent to Rp 162 per share from Rp 120 just a minute after trading opened, showing that there is still appetite for newcomers.The company’s share performance in the local bourse was helped by a slight recovery on large stocks on the exchange in the morning session. The Jakarta Composite Index (JCI), the main gauge on the IDX, had gained 1.7 percent before the afternoon break after losing 2.8 percent on Monday. Despite the increase, the index has lost about 28 percent of its value so far this year.Saraswanti Anuger… Google Indonesia stock-market Saraswanti-Anugerah fertilizer IPO listing revenue prospect Forgot Password ? Topics : Facebooklast_img read more