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Letters

first_imgLettersOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today This month’s lettersApril Fool not so far-fetched?Thank you to Joan Lewis and Linda Goldman for revealing the future of OH in‘A political issue’ (Occupational Health, April 2003). As the powerful collective of OH nursing organisations begins to flex itslobbying muscle, I allow myself to dream about the outcome. If I were to ask you to suspend your disbelief and dream with me, with nopossibility of failure, tell me this: – Who will the minister be? – Can we influence this decision? – What will a minister for occupational health do for our profession? – When will the collective reach a critical mass? – Does the collective know your views? Yes, I believe a critical mass is needed. Each voice that we can add to thecollective brings it more power. I urge you to add yours. Do you share thisdream? If this dream is to become a reality, what action do you (yes you) need totake? Claire Raistrick Advocate for the ‘Department of Occupational Health’ Editor’s reply: In the April issue of OH, we published an April Fool’sarticle by Linda Goldman and Joan Lewis, which described plans to introduce anew extra-governmental organisation to reorganise internal processes (EGOTRIP),with the formation of a Department for Occupational Health. But maybe this ideais not as far-fetched as it first seemed? Management holds key to absenteeismReading the April edition of Occupational Health, it is interesting, but notsurprising, that three articles are dedicated to the issue of absenteeism andrehabilitation in the workplace. The absence of an employee for a long period of time naturally puts pressureon an organisation, in terms of the costs of covering absence and also themorale of team workers. Achieving the smooth return to work of an employee who has been absent forsome time, requires early steps to be taken to establish a non-threateningrapport with the individual concerned. If the emphasis in managing sickness absence transfers from the GP to theemployer, (as correctly outlined in Graham Johnson’s article ‘Sickness absencecure’), it is essential that management has the appropriate skills andexpertise to deal with this issue. I have met many managers who see the return-to-work interview as justanother procedure that has to be carried out. Bill, one of my client departmental managers, told me: “It is justsomething I usually do while walking down the corridor, and I get the employeeto sign on the dotted line before I even get to my office.” If management are to be proactively involved in this process, they need afull understanding of the reasons behind the initiative, and training to ensurethey have good communication skills, so that discussions between them and theiremployees take place as an ongoing process, and not just when they are absent. Management has the key to absenteeism. OH is essentially in place whenneeded for its specific expertise, but management are there on the shopfloor toidentify and diffuse issues as and when they occur, and before they get out ofhand. The ‘Bills’ of this world cannot be expected to perform their jobeffectively, unless they have the tools to do the job. People are not necessarily born ‘good communicators and listeners’. Theyneed training, and organisations need to invest in developing people managementskills. Carole Spiers Carole Spiers Group, Corporate Wellbeing Consultants www.carolespiersgroup.com Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Occupational health research round-up: September 2018

first_img Previous Article Next Article No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Talking toolkits: unpicking Covid-19 return-to-work advice for occupational healthWith the UK now gradually reopening for business, organisations across the workplace health spectrum have been developing toolkits and resources… Related posts: Occupational health research round-up: September 2018By Sarah Silcox on 7 Sep 2018 in Cancer, Disability, Research, Return to work and rehabilitation, Occupational Health, Personnel Today Occupational Health & Wellbeing research round-up: December 2020Fatigue and workplace exercise programmesWork-related fatigue is related to a range of negative consequences, including poor productivity. This study… Amputation and return to workThe extent to which amputees integrate into normal living after losing a limb affects their return-to-work prognosis, according to this study of 147 people with lower extremity amputations. Almost 70% of the people in the study, who were all employed at the time of their limb loss, returned to work, although trans-femoral (above the knee) amputees were less likely to go back than others with lower extremity amputations. Another important factor affecting return-to-work was the number of years since the amputation, the study finds. However, the study concludes that the reason for amputation, that is, whether it was the result of a traumatic work-related event or a non-work-related incident, is not associated with return-to-work prognosis.Journeay W S et al. “Return to work after occupational and non-occupational lower extremity amputation.” Occupational Medicine, published online 27 June 2018.Return to work after common mental disordersWorkplace interventions designed to help those with mental ill health back to work are crucial to most organisational wellbeing policies and practices. This systematic review of 42 publications and meta-analysis of 32 studies reveals strong evidence that maintaining contact with employees off sick due to a common mental disorder is an effective approach, as are multicomponent interventions. The results of the research also suggest that interventions targeting stress rather than other mental ill health, such as personality disorders, are amongst the most successful in supporting return-to-work.Mikkelsen M B and Rosholm M. “Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions aimed at enhancing return to work for sick-listed workers with common mental disorders, stress-related disorder, somatoform disorders and personality disorders.“ Occupational & Environmental Medicine, published online 28 June 2018.Work-related outcomes in self-employed cancer survivorsSelf-employed people with a cancer diagnosis are less likely to take time off work as a result compared with salaried survivors, according to this multi-country study. Amongst those working at the time of the research, self-employed people had reduced their working hours to a greater degree (compared to their pre-diagnosis hours) than salaried workers, but still worked more hours per week than employed survivors. Self-employed people with cancers received less financial support when absent from work compared with salaried employees, and more of the former reported a negative financial impact as a result of the diagnosis. The authors conclude that, “self-employed survivors more often continued working during treatment and had, in general, worse financial outcomes than salaried cancer survivors.”Torp S et al. “Work-related outcomes in self-employed cancer survivors: a European multi-country study.” Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, published online 26 June 2018.9/11 rescuers at higher risk of drug-related mortalitySome rescue and recovery workers at the World Trade Center on 9/11 have a significantly elevated risk of dying from drug or alcohol-related causes, according to this analysis of data from the World Trade Center Health Registry for 2004 to 2012. In total, 5.5% of deaths amongst people on the register were related to substance abuse, but male rescue workers with 9/11-related post-traumatic stress disorder, particularly those who also sustained a physical injury, were at greatest risk of mortality due to drugs and/or alcohol.Welch A E et al. “Alcohol and drug-related mortality among enrollees in the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR), 2004-12.” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, published online 13 June 2018.OCD limits work participationPeople with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) experience marked difficulties participating in the labour market, according to this Swedish study of 16,267 individuals with the condition and 157,176 controls. People with OCD were more likely to be in receipt of a disability pension, be absent from work long-term or long-term unemployed. The authors conclude that their findings emphasise the need for cooperation between policy makers, workplace rehabilitation specialists and mental health specialists to design and implement strategies to improve the participation of people with OCD in the labour market.Pérez-Vigil A et al. “Labour market marginalisation in obsessive compulsive disorder: a nationwide register-based sibling control study.” Psychological Medicine, published online 28 June 2018.Going back to work early eases back painAn early return-to-work after an absence due to acute low back pain improves the condition and functional recovery, according to this longitudinal study of 557 individuals. Pain and function improved more rapidly for workers with an immediate return (30.7% improvement), or a return within seven working days (36.8%). The benefits of an early return were still partially observed even after controlling for a range of workplace, demographic and health variables.Shaw W S et al. “Early return to work has benefits for relief of back pain and functional recovery after controlling for multiple confounds.” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, published online 21 June 2018.Chronic illness and workplace adjustmentsChronically ill people, particularly as they age, often need adaptations to enable them to remain in work. This study explores how often such workplace modifications are made following a diagnosis of chronic disease, comparing the experiences of self-employed and employed older people. It finds that improvements to working conditions after a diagnosis of chronic illness, for example, giving people greater autonomy and control at work and lowering working hours, were restricted to self-employed people. The authors conclude that “this could suggest that workplace adjustments are necessary after diagnosis of chronic disease, but that the self-employed are more likely to realise these”.Fleischmann M et al. “Changes in autonomy, job demands and working hours after diagnosis of chronic disease: a comparison of employed and self-employed older persons using the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).” Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, published online 23 June 2018.Job strain cuts healthy life expectancyPoor psychosocial working conditions increase the likelihood of various types of morbidity and may reduce healthy or chronic disease-free life expectancy, this multi-country study suggests. Job strain was consistently related to shorter self-reported healthy life expectancy (1.7 years difference). The association was more pronounced among men and those in lower occupational positions, for example, a difference of 2.5 years was observed among low-grade men compared with 1.7 years among high-grade men. Job strain was also associated with shorter disease-free life expectancy, although this association was weaker and inconsistent, the authors conclude.Magnusson Hanson LL et al. “Job strain and loss of healthy life years between ages 50 and 75 by sex and occupational position: analyses of 64,934 individuals from four prospective cohort studies.” Occupational & Environmental Medicine 2018, volume 75, pp486-493.last_img read more

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Weber State continues domination of Montana State, 93-84

first_imgBraxton finished with 17 points and 12 rebounds for the Wildcats (13-6, 7-1), who picked up their fourth straight win by beating the Bobcats (7-11, 4-4) for the 10th straight time, including five in a row in Bozeman. Weber State is now 31-28 all-time at MSU. Freshman Israel Barnes scored 10 points on 4-of-6 shooting. Reserve Michal Kozak grabbed nine rebounds and Chapman pulled down seven as the Wildcats owned the boards 46-27. January 25, 2019 /Sports News – Local Weber State continues domination of Montana State, 93-84 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — Jerrick Harding, the reigning Big Sky Conference player of the week, tallied 23 points, Brekkott Chapman scored 21 and Zach Braxton pitched in with a double-double to propel Weber State to a 93-84 victory over Montana State on Thursday night. Associated Press Tyler Hall, who became the Big Sky’s all-time leading scorer in an 85-81 loss at Eastern Washington last time out, scored 28 to lead Montana State. He now sits at 2,222 points. Keljin Blevins added 17 points and Harald Frey scored 15 with five assists.center_img Tags: Big Sky/Weber State Wildcats Basketball Written by Chapman had 14 points and the Wildcats shot 55 percent from the floor to take a 44-35 lead into intermission. Harding, who came in averaging 21.3 points per game, good for second in Big Sky play, hit back-to-back 3-pointers to push the Wildcats’ lead to double digits early in the second half and the Bobcats got no closer than seven from there.last_img read more

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HMS Ocean Sails from London, UK

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today HMS Ocean Sails from London, UK HMS Ocean Sails from London, UK Britain’s largest wars hip HMS Ocean has yesterday sailed from London following her success in keeping the capital safe during the Olympic Games.The 21,500 tonne ship provided a very visible presence at Greenwich for the summer, acting as a helipad for aircraft to patrol the skies and as accommodation for more than 400 soldiers on Olympic security duties.As well as hosting high profile visits from the Prime Minister David Cameron and the Princess Royal, the ship controlled 180 flight deck landings from seven types of aircraft and sent personnel on more than 120 security patrols along the river.Chairman of the London 2012 Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG), Lord Coe said:“Our heartfelt thanks go to the men and women who stepped up to work shoulder to shoulder with us to deliver an effective, seamless and well regarded security operation.”The amphibious assault ship arrived in London in mid-July to much fanfare as sailors donned blue, yellow, black, green and red tops to form the Olympic rings on the flight deck, symbolising the nation’s building excitement.As one of her primary tasks was to coordinate the flying operations above the capital, her flight team immediately set to work and eventually clocked a total of 1680 hours of flying aircrew and snipers in their embarked Lynx helicopters.While the ship ran their security operation, the public were also welcomed on board with three open days attracting more than 11,000 visitors to explore the ship and meet the team keeping the capital safe.Three charity receptions were hosted on Ocean while their chefs busied themselves in the galley cooking up more than 100,000 meals for the ship’s company while visits from the Team GB athletes helped keep morale high.The sailors were also given the chance to explore Number 10 Downing Street after a personal invite from the Prime Minister to thank them for their efforts.Writer Colin Lingwood, aged 21, said: “It was a real honour for me to get a chance to visit such an important building, especially because it’s so rarely open to the public. “The most memorable part of the tour was our visit to the Cabinet Room – it was a great experience to stand in a room where all the big decisions that affect so many people’s lives are made.”As she leaves the capital behind, HMS Ocean will continue with her routine tasking which includes a visit to Holland.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, September 13, 2012; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: HMS Training & Education View post tag: Sails View post tag: London View post tag: fromcenter_img View post tag: ocean View post tag: UK Share this article View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval September 13, 2012last_img read more

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US Navy turns to drones to battle corrosion

first_img Photo: Topside Drone demonstration aboard the USS Midway Museum in San Diego, California. Photo: US Navy Share this article View post tag: Topside Drone The US Navy is looking to employ unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) as another tool in its inventory for the management of corrosion on its ships.In a recent demonstration, a UAV launched from the deck of the decommissioned USS Midway, capturing ship imagery for a few minutes along its predetermined flight path.Although decommissioned, the US Navy in partnership with the Midway Museum’s leadership team still discover opportunities to utilize the ship to benefit America’s sailors and marines.“Topside Drone” is a development of a corrosion/anomaly detection sensor payload and processing scheme, outfitted to a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) UAV.The technology will inspect and detect material defects, corrosion, warping and other conditions plaguing naval vessels. The drone flies around the area of inspection and takes photographs and measurements for evaluation to determine if corrosion exists—and the severity.TechSolutions—the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global’s rapid-response science and technology prototyping initiative—is the sponsor for this developing technology.“Corrosion is there all the time; elements like rain and seawater are constantly corroding a ship,” said Lt. Rouben Azad, a student at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, who attended the demonstration. “I have been on ships where it is difficult for the human eye to identify corrosion. Through infrared imagery, the Topside Drone inspection technology can identify corrosion from 80 feet away.”Topside Drone features complementary payloads for data collection. A LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) payload uses light in the form of a pulsed laser to measure distances to an object. A LiDAR scan accurately captures the geometry of everything in line of sight and is used to create a digital model of the ship.A second payload of visible/infrared camera captures images that orient geometrically to the digital model. The images are then algorithmically inspected for corrosion using computer vision.Photo: US Navy View post tag: US Navy In addition to enhanced identification capabilities, Topside Drone will reduce the maintenance demand for sailors.“Sailors spend a lot of their time looking at different things on the ship, from corrosion to other equipment,” said Dr. Mark Bilinski, Naval Information Warfare Center, Pacific and the integrated project team lead for topside drone. “A UAV can go around and take photos of the topside of a ship, collect that data quickly and autonomously, and then the data can be evaluated to identify if corrosion exists without tying up a sailor’s time.”During the demo, the computer vision algorithm analyzed the collected data and revealed significant corrosion all over the USS Midway—as a museum ship, it was a target-rich environment.TechSolutions accepts requests directly from sailors on the deck plates and marines on the front lines and delivers prototype solutions within approximately 12 months.The Topside Drone demonstration comes in the wake of a number of shipspotters and journalists highlighting the increasingly more present rust on US Navy ships. View post tag: rust managementlast_img read more

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OUP publishes largest thesaurus in the world

first_imgThis week sees the long-awaited publication of The Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary by Oxford University Press.The 3,952 page thesaurus has taken more than forty years to produce, has been staffed by 230 people who have dedicated 320, 000 hours of research and includes more than 800, 000 meanings and synonyms for words, some of which haven’t been used since 700AD.Ironically, the word with the largest category is “immediately”.Professor Quirk of UCL called the HTOED, “the single most significant tool ever devised for investigating semantic, social and intellectual history”… and will come handy if you wanted another word for deawwyrm, ædre or squinny and happened to have £275 to spare.last_img

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Celebrate Bob Dylan’s 75th Birthday With His Best Moments & Tributes

first_imgHappy 75th Birthday Bob Dylan! Possibly the greatest poet to come out of the 60s, Dylan is our most revered contemporary songwriter. His incredible catalog represents some of the most important work in the history of Folk, Americana, and Rock music. Classics tunes such as “All Along The Watchtower”, “Like A Rolling Stone”, “Maggie’s Farm”, “Tangled up in Blue”, and “I Shall Be Released” are just a small piece of the puzzle, as Dylan released several legendary and influential albums like Blood on the Tracks, Blonde on Blonde, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, and Highway 61 Revisited.Famous for “going electric” at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, Dylan is credited with bringing contemporary Folk music into the Rock era, weaving his politically-charged lyrics with the exciting live musicianship that we’ve come to expect from concerts today. By doing so, Dylan essentially merged the worlds of Folk and Rock that encouraged the musical counter-culture movement of the late 60’s.Dylan’s acceptance of “plugged in” instruments (and subsequent hiring of The Band as his “electric” band) inspired a generation of musicians to explore the medium, and he heavily influenced artists like The Grateful Dead, Neil Young, and Jimi Hendrix (among countless others) to plug in and explore their instruments and songs in new, groundbreaking ways. On top of all that (as the story goes), he even maybe-sort-of introduced The Beatles to the joys of marijuana! Without Bob Dylan, we might have never heard Jerry Garcia play one of his beautiful guitar solos on an electric guitar, The Beatles might have never been introduced to their psychedelic side, and The Band may have never made their way into the public eye. It’s truly amazing to consider how massive Bob Dylan’s influence has been to the world of music and the culture that surrounds it!To celebrate this legendary artist’s 75th birthday, check out some great footage of the man himself performing some of his best songs over the years, along with a few of his most fun collaborations, and some very impressive covers performed by an eclectic range of artists. Enjoy the videos below, and happy birthday Bob!“Mr. Tambourine Man” at Newport Folk Festival in 1964.“Maggie’s Farm” opening the first-ever electric set at Newport Folk Festival, performed by Bob Dylan in 1965 (note the heavy booing by angry folk music fans at the end!).Bob Dylan and The Band perform “Forever Young” during The Last Waltz.26 minutes of Bob Dylan with The Grateful Dead from Giants Stadium 7/12/1987 during their “Alone and Together” mini-tour.In the late 80’s, Bob Dylan was part of a super-group called the Travelling Wilburys with George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, and Tom Petty. While the band never toured together, here’s a music video of their hit song “Handle With Care.”Famed producer T. Bone Burnett organized these incredible contemporary songwriters to complete unfinished songs from Dylan’s Basement Tapes era with The Band. This modern supergroup, dubbed The New Basement Tapes, includes Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Marcus Mumford of Mumford and Sons, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, Rhiannon Giddens, and Elvis Costello. This video below captures Mumford singing the beautiful “Kansas City”, with special guest Johnny Depp filling in for Costello on guitar.Here’s some audio of the great Johnny Cash performing Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright” at Newport Folk Festival in 1964Dave Matthews Band has been covering Dylan’s incredible “All Along The Watchtower” for years. Check out this version from their Live in Central Park.Guns n’ Roses turned “Knockin on Heaven’s Door” into an arena rock anthem on Use Your Illusion II. Watch them perform the seminal song at Rock In Rio festival 1991.How does it feel?last_img read more

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Class of 2014 Convocation

first_imgHarvard’s leaders welcomed the Class of 2014 Tuesday (Aug. 31), in a convocation ceremony filled with pomp and circumstance. They urged the new students to use their College years as a time to experiment, learn, and discover.last_img

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Fakhri A. Bazzaz

first_imgFakhri A. Bazzaz, H. H. Timkin Professor of Science from 1984 to 1997 and then Mallinckodt Professor of Biology from 1997 until his retirement in 2004, passed away on February 6, 2008, of complications following a stroke.  A giant in the field of plant ecology, Bazzaz transformed the study of plant population biology through his deep knowledge of plant physiology.  The dominant theme throughout his career was that of how plants respond to natural and anthropogenic disturbance, from the classical area of plant succession—how plant communities succeed one another over time—to the impacts of global climate change on the productivity and stability of ecosystems.  Bazzaz’s landmark studies of old-field succession broke with the descriptive paradigm that dominated mid-twentieth century plant ecology and established a modern experimental approach grounded in mechanistic understanding of plant physiology and community interactions.  He played an equally important role in the study of climate change, conducting far-reaching work on the mechanisms by which plants, plant communities, and ecosystems respond to elevated carbon dioxide and other global change factors such as increases in temperature and nitrogen deposition.  Bazzaz was invited by Vice-President (then Senator) Al Gore to testify before Congress in 1992, and he was a signatory of a scientific letter to President Clinton in 1997, advising serious and careful attention to global climate change.  His long and productive career is recorded in nearly 300 scientific papers, 18 book chapters, and 6 books, while his lasting impact on the field of ecology is reflected in the careers of his 56 graduate students, 36 postdoctoral fellows, and 17 undergraduate research students.Fakhri Bazzaz was born in Baghdad, Iraq, on June 16, 1933, to a family prominent in public service.  He studied biology at Baghdad University, obtaining his undergraduate degree in 1953.  An Iraqi government scholarship for postgraduate study allowed him to complete both his M.Sc. (1960) and Ph.D. (1963) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, under the supervision of Professor Lawrence Bliss.  After two years as a Lecturer at Baghdad University, he returned to an assistant professor position at the University of Illinois, rising through the ranks to full professor, head of the department of plant biology, and acting director of the School of Life Sciences.The agricultural landscape of central Illinois, with its patchwork of abandoned fields, formed a natural laboratory in which Bazzaz first made his mark on ecology.  As such “old fields” give way to increasingly taller and more perennial vegetation, Bazzaz recognized that the process of species replacement was governed by the life history characteristics of individual species.  In doing so, he transformed what had been a purely phenomenological line of inquiry into a predictive, hypothesis-driven science.  Bazzaz used field, glasshouse, and laboratory experiments to test hypotheses of how the underlying mechanisms by which plants compete for resources influence community interactions.  Bazzaz was the first to understand that plasticity is itself a trait under selection and to study how variation in allocation to roots, leaves, and especially reproductive structures influences competitive interactions.  His infusion of physiological mechanism into plant population biology and his insistence on integrating the entire plant life cycle—from germination through to seed production—placed him at the vanguard of the nascent field of plant physiological ecology.Bazzaz’s move to Harvard University in 1984 coincided with an increasing focus on the study of climate change.  He was among the first ecologists to recognize not only the significance of such anthropogenic impacts on natural ecosystems, but also their complexity.  While other scientists were content to document the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on the growth of individual plants, Bazzaz realized that climate change had the potential to alter interactions between species and even to decrease plant diversity.  He documented how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations could have far-reaching impacts on ecological communities due to differential effects on the reproductive allocation of plants and the altered nutritional quality of plant tissues.  In particular, Bazzaz’s research showed how the effects of climate change on plants could cascade through the food chain, affecting communities of pollinators and herbivores with important consequences for human health.  He recognized the need to study interactions between rising carbon dioxide concentrations and other aspects of global change such as nitrogen deposition and increases in temperature.  He spoke eloquently and with great fervor about the dangers of climate change.  Bazzaz’s contributions to humanity are reflected in his scientific work, which lays bare the potential impacts of climate change on plant communities and the consequences for human well-being of failing to respond to such a serious and self-induced threat.Bazzaz was an energetic and dedicated teacher, who inspired a generation of young ecologists.  His commitment to students was reflected in the tightly organized and effective lab group that was the hallmark of his leadership style.  He took immense pride in his students’ success, both personal and professional, and considered their continued work an important part of his legacy.Throughout his career, Fakhri Bazzaz received many honors, including election as a Fellow of Clare Hall of Cambridge University (1981), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1987), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1989), and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (1993).  He was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1988, the Humboldt Forschungspreis in 1996, and the Desert Research Institute’s “Nevada Medal” in 2004.  Bazzaz received a founding membership in the Iraqi National Academy of Science in 2003, and he helped found the Arab Science and Technology Foundation and served on its Advisory Board.  He is survived by his wife of nearly 50 years, Maarib Bakri Bazzaz, his daughter Sahar Bazzaz of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his son Ammar Bazzaz of Chino, California.Respectfully submitted,David R. FosterAndrew H. KnollJames J. McCarthyDonald H. PfisterN. Michele Holbrook, Chairlast_img read more

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U.S. announces restoration of relations with Palestinians

first_imgUNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration is announcing a restoration of relations with the Palestinians and a renewal of aid to Palestinian refugees. The announcement by acting U.S. ambassador Richard Mills is a reversal of the Trump administration’s cutoff of aid to the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees. Mills told the U.N. Security Council this reengagement with the Palestinians is key to the Biden administration’s support for a two-state solution to the decades-old conflict agreed to by Israelis and Palestinians. He said Biden hopes to start working slowly to build confidence on both sides toward Israeli-Palestinian peace.last_img