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Family friend of missing Colorado mom pleads for help in search

first_imgWoodland Park Police Department(WOODLAND PARK, Colo.) — It’s been nearly three weeks since Kelsey Berreth, a young mother from Colorado, went missing, but her family and friends said they refuse to give up hope.“There’s gotta be somebody that saw something go on there, and if they would get in contact with the police department, so they can get to the bottom … that would be the greatest thing,” Jim Morgan, a close friend of the Berreth family, told ABC News’ Good Morning America on Thursday. “God is powerful and he answers prayers, and I’m just encouraging everybody to lift the family up, lift Kelsey up in prayer.”Berreth, a 29-year-old pilot, was last seen entering a Safeway near her home in Woodland Park, Colorado, on Nov. 22, according to surveillance footage from the store, but her fiancé, Patrick Frazee, said he saw her later that day.Berreth’s mother reported her missing on Dec. 2, police said. The FBI confirmed on Tuesday it’s assisting local authorities in the search.“Three weeks is a long time to be missing,” Morgan said. “We still have hope that she’ll be back and God will bring her back to us, but we certainly can’t guarantee that.”Morgan said he’s known the Berreth family for almost two decades.“In this world, good things don’t always happen, miracles don’t always happen, but fortunately God is with us through it anyway,” he added.Morgan described Berreth as a loving, caring, kind woman — someone who would do anything for her loved ones.“She was my son’s first babysitter, and he really liked her. That speaks highly to her character,” Morgan added. “Her dad is one of my best friends at this point, and we are talking regular trying to help him through a really tough time.”Neighbors and friends are scheduled to hold a candlelight vigil at Memorial Park in Woodland Park Thursday night, according to the Woodland Park Police Department.The footage of Berreth at the Safeway, released by police Tuesday night, showed her entering with her baby in a car seat and getting a shopping cart. It’s the last confirmed sighting of her.There were no leads or suspects as of early Thursday.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Coronavirus updates: School district cancels classes due to staff absences

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 776,000 people worldwide.Over 21.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 170,131 deaths.Here’s how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. 11:50 a.m.: NY gyms can soon reopen at limited capacityIn New York, gyms can open on Aug. 24 at 33% capacity, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.Masks will be mandatory at all times, he said, and health guidelines will be enforced including ventilation requirements.Localities must inspect the facilities before or within two weeks of reopening, Cuomo said, and localities will also make decisions on indoor fitness classes.New York, once the U.S. epicenter of the pandemic, now has one of the lowest coronavirus rates in the country, Cuomo said.Of those tested in New York state on Sunday, .71% tested positive for the coronavirus — the lowest daily number so far, Cuomo said.11:10 a.m.: LA launches testing, tracing program at schoolsThe Los Angeles Unified School District — the nation’s second largest school district — is launching a coronavirus testing and contact tracing program at schools, said Superintendent Austin Beutner.The district is reopening with virtual learning starting Tuesday.Staff, students and their families will get regular testing which will be used “to study the impact and effects of reopening,” the district said.“While this testing and contact tracing effort is unprecedented, it is necessary and appropriate,” Beutner said in a statement. “This will provide a public health benefit to the school community, as well as the greater Los Angeles area.”It also benefits students’ education “by getting them back to school sooner and safer and keeping them there,” he said.“We hope this effort also will provide learnings which can benefit other school systems,” he added.California has more than 625,000 coronavirus cases, higher than any other state in the U.S.8:15 a.m.: Bolivia’s case count tops 100,000 amid protestsMore than 100,000 people in Bolivia have now been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Bolivian Ministry of Health announced the grim milestone on Sunday night, noting that 60% of the diagnosed cases remain active, including 1,198 new infections. There were also 55 additional coronavirus-related fatalities in the past 24 hours, bringing the death toll to 4,058 nationwide.The South American nation descended into chaos and civil unrest last month after the government decided to postpone the first round of the presidential election again, due to the coronavirus pandemic. The vote, which was initially supposed to be held in May, will now take place on Oct. 18. Thousands of people have continued to protest in the streets.7:23 a.m.: Tulsa sees surge in teachers seeking to file willsA rising number of teachers in Tulsa, Oklahoma, are seeking to file wills amid the coronavirus pandemic and fears of returning to the classroom, according to a report from local ABC affiliate KTUL-TV.The Tulsa Classroom Teachers Association told KTUL that the requests from teachers to file wills have increased by 200% since May.Tulsa Public Schools is set to resume classes virtually on Aug. 31.Teachers told KTUL they are thankful that the school district is starting with distance learning for the first nine weeks and they hope it will be extended if the city’s COVID-19 numbers don’t go down. They said they’re afraid of bringing the virus home to their families.6:18 a.m.: Arizona school district cancels classes due to staff absencesA school district in Arizona was forced to cancel Monday classes after more than 100 staff members called out.The J. O. Combs Unified School District in Arizona’s Pinal County was set to resume in-person classes but notified parents in a letter dated Friday that “we have received a high volume of staff absences for Monday citing health and safety concerns.”“Due to these insufficient staffing levels, schools will not be able to re-open on Monday as planned,” the school district said. “This means that all classes, including virtual learning, will be canceled. At this time, we do not know the duration of these staff absences, and cannot yet confirm when in-person instruction may resume.”The school district added that they “will continue to monitor the situation and will share an update no later than 5:00 p.m. on Monday.”A spokesperson for the school district told Phoenix ABC affiliate KNXV-TV that at least 109 people, including teachers and office staff, have requested not to work.Last week, the head of the Arizona Health Services Department and the state’s superintendent of public instruction laid out a series of guidelines that public schools were urged to use when deciding whether COVID-19 infection rates are low enough to safely reopen for full in-person learning.5:37 a.m.: India’s coronavirus death toll crosses 50,000India’s health ministry recorded 941 additional coronavirus-related deaths in the past 24 hours, bringing the nationwide death toll to 50,921.The country of 1.3 billion people has the world’s fourth-highest death toll from COVID-19, behind the United States, Brazil and Mexico, according to a real-time tally kept by Johns Hopkins University.More than 2.6 million people in India have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began — the third-highest count in the world.4:29 a.m.: Another school closes its doors in Georgia amid rising casesA third school in Georgia’s Cherokee County is shuttering due to a growing cluster of coronavirus cases among its students and staff.The Cherokee County School District announced Sunday that it was temporarily closing Creekview High School in Canton, Georgia, with the hope of resuming in-person classes there on Aug. 31.“Over this weekend, the number of positive cases at Creekview High School has increased to a total of 25, with 500 of its 1,800 in-person students now under precautionary quarantine, and additional tests pending that would significantly increase the quarantine total,” the Cherokee County School District said in a statement. “We understand these closings create hardships and are disappointing to students who want to learn in-person as well as their families, but these are necessary measures to avoid potential spread within our schools.”The school district has also temporarily closed in-person learning at Woodstock High School and Etowah High School, where reopening is also tentatively scheduled for Aug. 31. Remote learning will be in effect for all students at the three schools in the meantime.Cherokee County reopened its schools on Aug. 3, welcoming back 30,000 students for in-person learning. Since then, at least 1,876 students and 45 staff members from more than a dozen schools have been placed under mandated two-week quarantines, according to data published on the school district’s website.3:45 a.m.: US reports under 1,000 new deaths for first time in seven daysThere were 42,048 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Sunday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Sunday’s case count is well below the record set on July 16, when more than 77,000 new cases were identified in a 24-hour reporting period.An additional 572 coronavirus-related deaths were also recorded Sunday. It’s the first time in seven days that the nation has reported under 1,000 new deaths.A total of 5,403,361 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 170,052 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July.An internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, obtained by ABC News on Sunday night, shows that the nationwide number of new cases over the last week has continued to decrease in week-over-week comparisons, while the number of new deaths has reversed and gone up. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Krill caught by predators and nets: differences between species and techniques

first_imgSamples of Antarctic krill collected from 6 seabird species and Antarctic fur seal during February 1986 at South Georgia were compared to krill from scientific nets fished in the area at the same time. The length-frequency distribution of krill was broadly similar between predators and nets although the krill taken by diving species formed a homogeneous group which showed significant differences from krill taken by other predators and by nets. There were significant differences in the maturity/sex stage composition between nets and predators; in particular all predator species showed a consistent sex bias towards female krill. Similarities in the krill taken by macaroni (offshore feeding) and gentoo (inshore feeding) penguins and differences between krill taken by penguins and albatrosses suggest that foraging techniques were more important than foraging location in influencing the type of krill in predator diets. Most krill taken by predators were adult; most female krill were sexually active (particularly when allowance is made for misclassification bias arising from predator digestion). Because female krill are larger, and probably less manouverable, than males, the biased sex ratio in predator diets at this time of year may reflect some combination of selectivity by predators and superior escape responses of male krill. Overall, adult, sexually active female krill, forming 40% by number of the local krill population, may comprise 60 to 70% by number and 75 to 88% by mass of the krill taken by their main seabird and seal predators at South Georgia at the time of peak local demand in February.last_img read more

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Get ready for National Cupcake Week

first_imgCupcake bakers and retailers are gearing up to what looks set to be a busy National Cupcake Week, next week.Running from 13-19 September 2010, the week aims to promote this key bakery product of choice, and, importantly, boost sales of cupcakes in your shops.There are now nearly 600 members of the National Cupcake Week group on Facebook, and almost 500 followers of the Week on Twitter. Last month, British Baker announced the Cupcake Champion of Great Britain 2010 – David Bennett of the Sunshine Bakery in Chapel Allerton, Leeds – in a national competition, which saw over 60 entries from professional bakers. Sky television channel Food Network UK, which recently filmed the judging of the cupcake competition, has also been plugging the event every half an hour, on Sky 262 and 263+1.Visit the National Cupcake Week page on bakeryinfo.co.uk to see which bakeries are getting involved this year, and to download a free branded A3 poster and National Cupcake Week logo, which can be used in your shops to generate consumer interest and to promote the week.>>Cupcake Champion of Britain 2010 announced>>Cupcake Champion reveals alllast_img read more

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News story: Education Secretary appoints new Social Mobility Commissioners

first_img I am delighted to welcome a record number of Social Mobility Commissioners who will work to make England a fairer society. This is a group of people with real-life experiences of social mobility to help challenge government, business, and society as a whole, to create a fair system where people can thrive. Many of our new Commissioners had modest starts in life and know the barriers that young people must overcome to become successful. They are also individuals with the skills, resources, and energy to drive real change around the country, united by a passion for fairness and an ability to make a real difference to people’s lives. The Social Mobility Commissioners will take up their new roles next month with an event planned to mark the Commission’s relaunch on 11 December.Their appointments build on Dame Martina’s vision to bring greater ethnic, gender and age diversity to Commission by tapping into a diverse range of backgrounds.Younger commissioners, as well as members based outside London and the south east will make sure its work is better represented regionally, helping to raise its profile and influence young people directly.Joining Dame Martina as commissioners will be: The new commissioners come from all walks of life and include leaders from the fields of business, education and technology. Many have their own personal stories of how they have overcome barriers to success and now work to improve social mobility in their sectors.Education Secretary Damian Hinds said: The appointments follow approval from the Prime Minister and the Public Appointments Committee, and include the editor of a women’s magazine Cosmopolitan, a university professor, a headteacher and two youth ambassadors.Dame Martina Milburn, Chair of the Social Mobility Commission said:center_img Dame Martina and I share a vision for a country where we raise our ambitions for every child, whatever their background. Education is at the heart of this, giving everyone the chance to fulfil the spark of potential that exists in them. This new team of commissioners brings together established business men and women, policy makers, academics and young people all with important perspectives to bring. The Social Mobility Commission will benefit from the expertise of this diverse mix of individuals, all of whom will bring their own unique stamp to what social mobility means in their lives. I look forward to working with the new Commission to make our shared vision a reality. Alastair da Costa, Chair of Capital City College Group Liz Williams, Group Director of Digital Society at BT Farrah Storr, Editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan Harvey Matthewson, Volunteer, and part-time Sales Assistant at Marks & Spencer Jessica Oghenegweke, Project co-ordinator at the Diana Award Jody Walker, Senior Vice President at TJX Europe (TK Maxx and Home Sense in the UK) Pippa Dunn, Founder of Broody, helping entrepreneurs and start ups Saeed Atcha, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Xplode magazine Sam Friedman, Associate Professor in Sociology at London School of Economics Sammy Wright, Vice Principal of Southmoor Academy, Sunderland Sandra Wallace, Managing Partner UK and Joint Managing Director Europe at DLA Piper Steven Cooper, Outgoing Chief Executive Officer of Barclaycard Businesslast_img read more

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Tank And The Bangas Release New Hip-Hop-Infused Single “Nice Things” [Listen]

first_imgNew Orleans five-piece Tank and The Bangas are gearing up to release their sophomore studio album, Green Balloon, due out on Friday, May 3rd via Verve Forecast Records.Brought to fame as the unanimous winners of NPR’s Tiny Desk contest in 2017, Tank and The Bangas have been all aboard a wild ride since the band jumped on the map. Following up the band’s debut LP, 2013’s Think Tank, in April 2018, Tank and The Bangas released “Smoke.Netflix.Chill“, their first release via a major label (Verve Forecast). Led by vocalist and songwriter Tarriona “Tank” Ball, the group continues to evolve in more ways than just music, as Tank continues to grow and develop as a performer and writer.Well-respected producers including Jack Splash, Mark Batson, Zaytoven, Louie Lastic, and Robert Glasper (who also features on three tracks) were all tapped to help create the 17-track LP.Tarriona “Tank” Ball shared her thoughts on the new LP. She explains,‘Green Balloon’ is a sister to ‘Think Tank’. ‘Think Tank’ was 12, and ‘Green Balloon’ is 16 and having sex. She’s out there.Ahead of Green Balloon‘s May 3rd release, Tank and The Bangas have shared a catchy new hip-hop-infused tune, “Nice Things”, which you can listen to below:Tank and The Bangas – “Nice Things”[Video: TankandtheBangas]Head here to pre-order Tank and The Bangas’ Green Balloon LP.For ticketing and a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates in support of their forthcoming record, head to Tank and The Bangas’ website.Green Balloon Tracklist:01. Colors Introduction02. Spaceships03. Dope Girl Magic04. Ants05. Hot Air Balloons (feat. Alex Isley)06. Forgetfulness07. Get Up Interlude (feat. Robert Glasper)08. Too High Prelude09. I Don’t Get High10. Happy Town (feat. Pell)11. Nice Things12. Smoke.Netflix.Chill.13. Floating Interlude14. Mr. Lion15. In London Interlude (feat. Robert Glasper)16. Lazy Daze (feat. Robert Glasper)17. Colors ChangeView Tracklistlast_img read more

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Researchers create quantum calculator

first_imgProgramming a computer is generally a fairly arduous process, involving hours of coding, not to mention the laborious work of debugging, testing, and documenting to make sure it works properly.But for a team of physicists from the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms and the California Institute of Technology, things are actually much tougher.Working in a Harvard Physics Department lab, a team of researchers led by Harvard Professors Mikhail Lukin and Markus Greiner and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Vladan Vuletic developed a special type of quantum computer, known as a quantum simulator, that is programmed by capturing super-cooled rubidium atoms with lasers and arranging them in a specific order, then allowing quantum mechanics to do the necessary calculations.The system could be used to shed light on a host of complex quantum processes, including the connection between quantum mechanics and material properties, and it could investigate new phases of matter and solve complex real-world optimization problems. The system is described in a Nov. 30 paper published in the journal Nature.The combination of the system’s large size and high degree of quantum coherence make it an important achievement, researchers say. With more than 50 coherent qubits, this is one of the largest quantum systems ever created with individual assembly and measurement.In the same issue of Nature, a team from the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland described a similarly sized system of cold charged ions, also controlled with lasers. Taken together, these complimentary advances constitute a major step toward large-scale quantum machines.“Everything happens in a small vacuum chamber where we have a very dilute vapor of atoms which are cooled close to absolute zero,” Lukin said. “When we focus about 100 laser beams through this cloud, each of them acts like a trap. The beams are so tightly focused, they can either grab one atom or zero; they can’t grab two. And that’s when the fun starts.”A close up of a laser used in the quantum simulator to trap atoms for manipulation. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerUsing a microscope, researchers can take images of the captured atoms in real time, and then arrange them in arbitrary patterns for input.“We assemble them in a way that’s very controlled,” said Ahmed Omran, a postdoctoral fellow in Lukin’s lab and a co-author of the paper. “Starting with a random pattern, we decide which trap needs to go where to arrange them into desired clusters.”As researchers begin feeding energy into the system, the atoms begin to interact with each other. Those interactions, Lukin said, give the system its quantum nature.“We make the atoms interact, and that’s really what’s performing the computation,” Omran said. “In essence, as we excite the system with laser light, it self-organizes. It’s not that we say this atom has to be a one or a zero — we could do that easily just by throwing light on the atoms — but what we do is allow the atoms to perform the computation for us, and then we measure the results.”Those results, Lukin and colleagues said, could shed light on complex quantum mechanical phenomena that are all but impossible to model using conventional computers.“If you have an abstract model where a certain number of particles are interacting with each other in a certain way, the question is why don’t we just sit down at a computer and simulate it that way?” asked Ph.D. student Alexander Keesling, another co-author. “The reason is because these interactions are quantum mechanical in nature. If you try to simulate these systems on a computer, you’re restricted to very small system sizes, and the number of parameters are limited.“If you make systems larger and larger, very quickly you will run out of memory and computing power to simulate it on a classical computer,” he added. “The way around that is to actually build the problem with particles that follow the same rules as the system you’re simulating. That’s why we call this a quantum simulator.”Though it’s possible to use classical computers to model small quantum systems, the simulator developed by Lukin and colleagues uses 51 qubits, making it virtually impossible to replicate using conventional computing techniques.“It is important that we can start by simulating small systems using our machine,” he said. “So we are able to show those results are correct … until we get to the larger systems, because there is no simple comparison we can make.” Related “When we start off, all the atoms are in a classical state. And when we read out at the end, we obtain a string of classical bits, zeros, and ones,” said Hannes Bernien, another postdoctoral fellow in Lukin’s lab, and also a co-author. “But in order to get from the start to the end, they have to go through the complex quantum mechanical state. If you have a substantial error rate, the quantum mechanical state will collapse.”It’s that coherent quantum state, Bernien said, that allows the system to work as a simulator, and also makes the machine a potentially valuable tool for gaining insight into complex quantum phenomena and eventually performing useful calculations. The system already allows researchers to obtain unique insights into transformations between different types of quantum phases, called quantum phase transitions. It may also help shed light on new and exotic forms of matter, Lukin said.“Normally, when you talk about phases of matter, you talk about matter being in equilibrium,” he said. “But some very interesting new states of matter may occur far away from equilibrium … and there are many possibilities for that in the quantum domain. This is a completely new frontier.”Already, Lukin said, the researchers have seen evidence of such states. In one of the first experiments conducted with the new system, the team discovered a coherent non-equilibrium state that remained stable for a surprisingly long time.“Quantum computers will be used to realize and study such non-equilibrium states of matter in the coming years,” he said. “Another intriguing direction involves solving complex optimization problems. It turns out one can encode some very complicated problems by programming atom locations and interactions between them. In such systems, some proposed quantum algorithms could potentially outperform classical machines. It’s not yet clear whether they will or not, because we just can’t test them classically. But we are on the verge of entering the regime where we can test them on the fully quantum machines containing over 100 controlled qubits. Scientifically, this is really exciting.”Other co-authors of the study were visiting scientist Sylvain Schwartz, Harvard graduate students Harry Levine and Soonwon Choi, research associate Alexander S. Zibrov, and Professor Manuel Endres.This research was supported with funding from the National Science Foundation, the Center for Ultracold Atoms, the Army Research Office, and the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship. Harvard researchers create room-temperature quantum bits that store data for nearly two seconds Quantum computing, no cooling requiredlast_img read more

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Harvard launches life sciences joint degree

first_img Read Full Story Harvard Business School (HBS) and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) announced this week a new joint master’s degree program that aims to prepare future leaders at the interface of  life sciences and business. The two-year, full-time program begins in August 2020 and will confer both a Master of Business Administration from HBS and a Master of Science from GSAS, through Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB).The new MS/MBA Biotechnology: Life Sciences Program equips students with approaches to the science and medical aspects of entrepreneurial activities and will empower them to build organizations with the potential to transform human health. The curriculum emphasizes an understanding of effective, sustainable structures for discovery and development, the ethical implications of new therapeutics, and equitable access to the fruits of therapeutic discovery.“The world needs more leaders able to bridge science and business,” said HBS Dean Nitin Nohria. “We aim to provide graduates of this new program with tools to understand the most modern biomedical science issues, as well as knowledge of scientific methodologies and timeframes, so they can be effective leaders in this domain.”Students in the program will receive life-science training in HSCRB, a joint department between Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Harvard Medical School.“This is a collaborative effort from several schools across Harvard to fill a unique need we see in the industry,” said Emma Dench, dean of GSAS. “Currently there is no systematic educational approach to train leaders in this field but students yearn for an opportunity to become conversant in biomedical science and business together. Nearly half of HSCRB graduates are now entering careers in biotech/pharma, biomedical consulting, and finance. We want to prepare them to be leaders in these fields, while helping others that may gravitate towards leadership roles in government and non-profits involved in the life sciences.”The Master of Science degree component is led by world-renowned Harvard scientists and clinicians who have extensive biotechnology and pharmaceutical experience. They will give students distilled, focused exposure to a wide range of modern science and show them potential ways to deploy their learnings strategically for the discovery of novel therapeutics.The MBA component is directed by business school faculty members who are experts in biotechnology leadership, financing, and social ramifications. The seamless integration of all these elements will prepare students for leadership in the biotechnology-related arena in a manner that is not currently available through traditional programs.MS/MBA Biotechnology: Life Sciences students will complete their degree requirements over two years, augmented by coursework during August at the beginning of the program and during both January terms. Students will have the summer available between the first and second years to pursue an internship in the life sciences or biotech space.The program aims to attract a diverse group of outstanding students who have an undergraduate degree in life sciences or medicine or significant workplace experience in biotechnology or life sciences.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students pursue fifth year in engineering program at Notre Dame

first_imgTags: engineering, graduate, Math, Notre Dame College of Engineering, science, STEM, Welcome Weekend 2017 Notre Dame College of Engineering will welcome ten Saint Mary’s students into its graduate program this year. Saint Mary’s is one of two women’s colleges in the country to offer an engineering program.Students can earn their first bachelor’s degree from Saint Mary’s and then a second bachelor of science in engineering from Notre Dame during a fifth year of study, according to the College’s website. College alumna Kaleigh Ellis, who will earn a degree in chemical engineering at Notre Dame, hopes to pursue a career in research and development for chemical products. Ellis said in an email she decided to partake in the dual degree program because she wanted both a technical education and a liberal arts education.“ … I wanted to learn more about the elements that make up our world but also about the large-scale products designed from those elements,” she said. “I enjoyed the challenges of all my classes and loved how I could still have a technical education along with a strong focus in liberal arts. I like having a well-rounded education, and I believe the skills I have learned from both schools will propel me into a successful career.”Shelby Lem majored in computing and applied mathematics at Saint Mary’s and will study computer science at Notre Dame. Lem said in an email she has always loved math and problem solving but was not sure she would like engineering. “When I decided to go to Saint Mary’s, I knew I wanted to pursue a mathematics degree,” she said. “When I was visiting, I had heard about the engineering program, but I wasn’t exactly sure if I would like engineering or which type of engineering I wanted to do. My sophomore year, we took the [introduction] to engineering course, and I fell in love with all of the programming we got to do in that class and quickly realized I wanted to pursue computer science.”Adrienne Bruggeman majored in chemistry at Saint Mary’s and will pursue an environmental engineering degree at Notre Dame. She said in an email she chose her major because it allowed her to engage in two of her passions: science and engineering.“I think this program catered to my indecisive nature,” she said. “I have always loved learning, and this allowed me to pursue both science and engineering wholeheartedly without having to choose one over the other. I didn’t realize until well into the program that lots of people see no need to combine science and engineering, but I’ve seen the benefit of the overlap.” Patricia Hale will study computer science at Notre Dame and pursue a concentration in cyber security. She said in an email she decided to pursue the dual degree program because she developed an interest in a major and area of study that was not offered at Saint Mary’s. “I wanted to get a degree in computer science and study cyber security, and it was not offered at Saint Mary’s,” she said. “I am super excited to take classes in computer forensics, [which] should be offered in the Spring.”Lem said she does not think transitioning into her fifth year of schooling will be difficult.  “I have been going to classes with all of the Notre Dame students in my major for the past three years,” she said. “Other people [who] have gone through the program have told us that their fifth year was their easiest year yet. This is mostly due to our fourth year being so challenging.” Bruggeman said she thinks the transition into her fifth year of education will be seamless. “I am a fully integrated member of my engineering class after the last three years of classes in the program,” she said. “I think the biggest challenge through this transition is missing my friends who weren’t sneaky enough to steal an extra year at Saint Mary’s or Notre Dame.”Lem said she is most looking forward to taking web applications and software engineering classes, as she wants to pursue work as a software developer after college while encouraging more young women to do the same. “After graduating, I hope to work as a software developer, preferably for a clothing or retail company,” she said. “In the future I would also love to start my own company making mobile apps and web services.”Progress is to be made in regards to leveling the gender gap in STEM fields, Lem said.“While the number of women joining the tech world is growing slowly, I believe there is always more we can do,” she said. “Young women need more role models who they can see themselves in. If I can be a role model for at least one young girl, I would feel accomplished.” Bruggeman said she is looking forward to taking some elective classes, as she has not had a chance to do so since her first year at Saint Mary’s.“I’m especially looking forward to my first elective since freshman year, The Chemistry of Distillation and Fermentation,” she said. “I hope that the class will be one of those fun senior year electives that I didn’t get to have last year, and it’s nice that I get a second chance in this respect.”Ellis said she thinks the only difficult aspect of her final year at Notre Dame will be continuing on without the Saint Mary’s professors she has come to know and love. “The one thing I will definitely miss is having classes at Saint Mary’s and all the wonderful professors we have,” she said. Hale said she will miss all her peers who earned degrees in fields unrelated to engineering.“The hardest part of the transition for me will be being without my fellow Belles [who] are not studying engineering,” she said. last_img read more

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Shocking Water.

first_imgWashing foods with electrolyzed water can sometimes be up to10 times more effective at killing harmful bacteria than traditionalrinsing techniques, according to one University of Georgia scientist.”Currently, the food industry washes foods with a chlorinesolution to kill bacteria,” said Yen Con Hung, a food scientistat UGA’s Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement in Griffin,Ga. “This method is effective, but it takes time to mix thechlorine solution and to ensure the correct concentration of residualchlorine in the solution.”Hunghas been testing a new method, which uses a combination of water,electricity and a salt solution to enhance the properties of water.The water and salt solution flow through a machine called an electrolyzedoxidizing water unit. The positive ions run through one side,and the negative ions through the other. The result is two formsof water; one very acidic and one with very high pH levels.Kills Bacteria BetterTesting the two waters in his laboratory, Hung found the acidicwater very effective at killing harmful bacteria. “We havetested this water on shell eggs, apples, lettuce and cutting boards,”Hung said. “It has a very strong bacterial killing effect,and for some applications has better effect than the currentlyused water/chlorine solutions.”Working with UGA sensory specialists, Hung put the acidic waterthrough consumer tests. “We had trained panelists compareproducts which were not treated to products treated with the water,”he said. “They found no differences in color, appearanceor smell.”Powerful SanitizerHung also tested the high pH water and found it to be extremelyuseful as a sanitizer. “It works like a soap, and it easesthe attachment of proteins and lipids in food materials to thefood preparation and processing surfaces,” Hung said.Hung’s research findings were published just a few months agoand he is already getting response from the food industry. “Thedevice is manufactured in Japan and Russia, and it isn’t beingused in the United States, yet,” he said. “We have alreadyheard from companies that are interested in using the processhere in the U.S.”Perfect for Food Service OperationsHung envisions the process being used by food service operationsfirst. “The small unit could easily be used in food servicefacilities,” Hung said. “It’s easier for workers touse so there would be no excuses for not using it. There’s nothingto prepare and mix, and you wouldn’t have to leave customers waiting.”He says the unit could also be useful in food processing plants.”In mass production, this technology would be very cost effective,”Hung said. “When you want to use it, you push a button. Youdon’t have to worry with mixing up concentrated liquids, and it’smore effective than chlorine rinses.”May Be Useful to ProcessorsIn the future, Hung plans to test the application of electrolyzedoxidized water during chicken processing. “We want to usethe water on chicken carcasses to see if it cuts down on the levelsof salmonella and campylobacter,” Hung said. “If itdoes, this treatment could be incorporated into chicken processingplants.”Hungalso plans to test the water on food products that are hard totreat to remove bacteria. “You can’t use heat to kill bacteriaon products like fresh berries and seafood like raw oysters,”Hung said. “The food needs to be safe, but no one wants theiroysters to be cooked. They wouldn’t be raw oysters any longer.”He also plans to further study what makes the water so effectiveand which properties in the water work best at killing bacteria.Home Use Down the Road”In Japan, there are home units similar to this that areused for treating water,” Hung said. “It purifies drinkingwater and lowers the pH levels.”Hung says he hopes to someday see U.S. consumers using homeversions of the electrolyzed water units. “It would be handyand could easily clean your food and sanitize your kitchen,”he said. “Until then, consumers should continue to wash theirfood products at home before preparing them for their families.”(Photographs by Sharon Omahen.) This story is another in a weekly series called “Planting the Seed: Science for the New Millennium.” These stories feature ideas and advances in agricultural and environmental sciences with implications for the future.last_img read more