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Post-subduction margin structures along Boyd Strait, Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgThe Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula to the southwest of the Hero Fracture Zone (HFZ) is a former subducting margin which became inactive following the arrival of ridge crest segments of the Antarctic – Phoenix ridge at the margin during the Tertiary. In contrast, the part of the margin to the northeast of the HFZ remains active. Tertiary convergence was approximately perpendicular to the margin and ongoing motion is thought to have the same orientation. A new seismic reflection profile running along Boyd Strait, just northeast of the landward projection of the HFZ, shows major structural components similar to those typically observed along the margin to the southwest of the HFZ. In order of increasing proximity to the margin, these components are: the inner shelf, the shelf basin, the mid-shelf basement high (MSBH), and the outer shelf. The continuation of the post-subduction margin structures to the active margin suggests that the boundary between crust with passive and active margins characteristics is not sharply defined. Our postulated scenario for tectonic evolution along Boyd Strait is that: (1) before the arrival of the last ridge crest segment to the southwest of the HFZ, the inner shelf and the shelf basin were part of a Cretaceous-Tertiary arc and forearc area, (2) after the arrival, thermal effects resulting from interaction of the ridge crest with the margin just southwest of the HFZ lead to the formation of the MSBH to the northeast, but MSBH uplift in Boyd Strait did not prevent concurrent cross-shelf sediment transport contributing to development of an extensive outer shelf on the seaward flank of the MSBH, (3) Recent extension in Bransfield Strait, a marginal basin to the northeast of the landward projection of the HFZ, has caused about 10 kin of seaward deflection in the strike of the part of the MSBH to the northeast of the projection of the HFZ.last_img read more

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Utah MBB Adds Wenzel to 2019-20 Roster

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY – The Utah men’s basketball program announced the addition of incoming freshman Brendan Wenzel, who will join the Runnin’ Utes’ roster for the upcoming 2019-20 season. Tags: Brendan Wenzel/Utah Runnin’ Utes Basketball April 23, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah MBB Adds Wenzel to 2019-20 Rostercenter_img “Brendan has very good size and is an elite shooter,” said Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak. “Adding a high-caliber shooter was a priority and it will become a great asset to our program.”A true freshman out of Helotes, Texas, Wenzel is a 6-6, 180-pound guard that will graduate from O’Connor High School (San Antonio) this spring. He ranked as the No. 18th overall player in the state of Texas, according to Rivals/TexasHoops.com.This past season as a senior, Wenzel averaged 24.1 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 0.9 steals per game. He shot 41 percent from three-point range and was an 87 percent shooter from the free throw line. He was named to the 2019 Texas Association of Basketball Coaches (TABC) Class 6A All-State First Team and was named to the San Antonio Express News Super Team. Wenzel helped lead the Panthers to a 24-10 overall record this past season, which included a trip to the state playoffs where he averaged more than 25 points per game.Wenzel joins an incoming freshman class that also includes Jaxon Brenchley, Branden Carlson, Mikael Jauntunen, Rylan Jones and Matt Vankomen. Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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LSU quarterback shatters records with National Championship win

first_imgJanuary 14, 2020 /Sports News – National LSU quarterback shatters records with National Championship win FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail33ft/iStock(NEW ORLEANS) — Louisiana State University beat Clemson University to win the College Football National Championship Monday night — and they did so in record fashion.LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, the 2019 Heisman Trophy winner, broke single-season records for touchdown passes and touchdowns responsible for to help his team defeat the No. 3 ranked Clemson Tigers, 42-25.The win marks LSU’s fourth national title.The top-ranked LSU Tigers, as well as Clemson, both went into Monday night’s championship game in New Orleans undefeated at 14-0.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Written bycenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Tips for Opening Up Your Shore House

first_imgBroadley’s has some important tips to share about properly opening up your home after the dormant winter months. Before you begin planning your Memorial Day Weekend plans or decorating for the rentals, take a moment to go through this simple home checklist!Tune-up your heating and A.C. systemsIt is important to make sure your heating and cooling systems are working properly by having one of our service technicians provide a regularly scheduled maintenance check. If there is an issue, we can help you determine whether the unit is in need of repairs or if it is financially beneficial to replace it with a new one, which are typically much more efficient and bring down utility costs. Also, while you’re having your systems inspected, make sure you have the air filters replaced to help alleviate any type of air pollution in your home. How often you change them depends on use, environment, pets, and other varying factors.Replace your window A.C. units with A Ductless SystemNow is the time to check your window A.C. units if you have them and make sure they’re still running correctly. If your unit does need replacing, this may be the perfect opportunity to look into ductless installs for a more energy efficient, safe, and reliable way to cool and heat your home.Keep an eye out for plumbing issuesRemember that little leaks or a dripping faucet can lead to huge problems. A small leak might mean larger unseen damage due to winter conditions and will drive your water bill through the roof.If you have any questions or concerns about your home, call Broadley’s today at (609) 390-3907 or visit www.broadleys.net to have one of our Comfort Advisers contact you quickly. We’ll make sure to help with your spring cleaning and have your home ready for sweet summertime!last_img read more

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Coronavirus: bakers take action in face of pandemic

first_imgBakers across the UK are taking steps to reduce the risk of coronavirus to staff and customers through a series of practical measures.Some are taking extra precautions to ensure surfaces remain clean, while others are asking customers to use contactless payments instead of cash to reduce the risk of contamination. Some are looking to help those in their local communities that are self-isolating through delivery schemes, but in return are asking customers to shop local and help keep their businesses afloat.In light of the pandemic, Campden BRI virology section manager Martin D’Agostino, recently answered some of the key questions bakers and food suppliers may have about coronavirus.Here are some examples of action taken across the baking industry:Lovingly Artisan, KendalBritish Baker’s 2019 Baker of the Year is hitting the road with the mission of taking its sourdough to its customers and their families. It is to host a pop-up at real ale bar The Factory Tap every Wednesday from 4pm to 7pm as well as selling baked goods from its Bread Store daily as usual. Pop-ups at Windermere Rugby Club are also coming soon.“Now, more than ever, it’s all about working together, looking after each other and we will look after you with our ancient grains,” owner Aidan Monks posted to the bakery’s customers on Facebook.“If you’d rather avoid shopping in large, busy scenarios and online shopping is not your vibe – it’s time to think about opting to shop differently. It’s time to support your local, small independents who simply want to look after you and their own team too.”Customers will also notice the introduction of brown tissue when the Lovingly Artisan team are handling the sourdough as well as wearing blue gloves. In addition, it has introduced washing hands after each transaction and is encouraging customers to pay by card.Seasons Bakery, North YorkshireBaking Industry Awards winner Seasons Bakery is implementing a variety of measures across its operations to cope with changes caused by coronavirus.The bakery is encouraging customers to pay by contactless methods and is taking extra hygiene precautions. Staff are now required to wear blue gloves to avoid cross-contamination and delivery vans are disinfected every day, while external delivery drivers are asked to not enter the bakery.“We’re encouraging people not to handle cash and all shop staff are now wearing gloves. We’re also leaving the door to the bakery open, so people aren’t transferring germs via the handles,” Seasons Bakery owner Dan Nemeth told British Baker.However, Nemeth admitted he had seen a drop in wholesale orders as a result of coronavirus, but said the retail side of the business was busy.“Due to increased demand, we have decided to put on two bakes a day,” he said on Facebook. “This is to hopefully give everyone a fair chance at grabbing a loaf, so we don’t completely sell out by 10am like we have the last few days.”Seasons Bakery is also offering a door-to-door delivery service of bread, eggs, cakes and milk within a 25-mile radius to further help its local community.Orange Bakery, WatlingtonRun by 15-year-old Kitty Tait and her father Alex, Orange Bakery is offering to deliver bread by bike to anyone self-isolating, it said on Instagram. The duo are also taking extra precautions to ensure the bakery is as hygienic as possible. Measures include using blue gloves while handling all products, using tongs in the bakery and wiping down the bakery four times a day with antibacterial wipes.Sugardough, HoveBakery and café Sugardough has implemented a temporary change to its ‘bring your own cup’ policy, which sees customers receive a 20p discount for using a refillable cup for hot drinks. For the time being, Sugardough will not be refilling customer cups and will only be selling coffee in takeaway ones – however customers who bring their own cups are still entitled to the discount.It has also sought to reassure customers that surfaces are sanitised regularly throughout the day with door handles, card readers and banisters among the surfaces cleaned.Born & Bread Bakery, NorthamptonshireThis bakery and café, located in Long Buckby, is still serving up fresh bread, cakes and pastries to its customers, but with a few tweaks. Some food items that are usually on open display will be kept in the kitchen, so customers are encouraged to speak to staff to find out what is on offer.It has also asked for customers to allow time for tables to be sanitised before sitting down, particularly during busy periods. Bread and baked goods can also be pre-ordered to reduce the time spent in the shop as well.As with many other bakeries, Born & Bread has requested that patrons experiencing a fever, cough or any other symptoms are asked to stay at home. Staff will also follow this advice.Reeve the Baker, SalisburyReeve the Baker is looking to uphold the “highest standards of hygiene” in its main bakery and shops to do everything it can to minimise risk. The sites are cleaned throughout each day and a new cleaning schedule has been implemented whereby surfaces are sanitised even more frequently, while staff are handling products using serving tongs, hygiene gloves or other packaging.“As this situation evolves, we will do our very best to keep our bakery and shops running,” Gary Reeve said in a statement on Twitter.“Clearly, we may have to adapt, we may not be able to provide a full product range and we may be short-staffed in some shops. Please may we ask for your understanding and patience as we all try to navigate through these unprecedented and difficult times.”The Flour Pot Bakery, BrightonThe Flour Pot Bakery is mixing up the way it serves customers, as well as implementing additional regular sanitising and deep cleaning.Customers who are eating in are asked to sanitise or wash their hands before taking a seat, while door handles, chair backs and tables are disinfected after each use.“We are operating a ‘hands-free’ service option so that any customer with illness symptoms need only ask staff and we will serve them, so that they do not need to contact anything but their purchase. Our team are finding ways to adapt, so that we are maintaining the highest possible standards of hygiene and product quality,” the bakery said on Instagram.Customers can also use a click-and-collect option to order online bread, coffee, sandwiches, pastries or cakes and pick-up at their convenience.last_img read more

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Widespread Panic’s John Bell Talks Col. Bruce Hampton & The Art Of “Improvising Eloquently” [Interview]

first_imgOn April 27th and 28th, Trondossa Music & Arts Festival will return to Riverfront Park in North Charleston, SC for its second year. The two-day event will feature performances by Umphrey’s McGee, The Wood Brothers, Rainbow Kitten Surprise, The Marcus King Band, and more. Of course, the Trondossa artist lineup is anchored by host band Widespread Panic, who will perform four sets over the course of the event.Ahead of this weekend’s Trondossa excitement, Live For Live Music Widespread Panic correspondent Otis Sinclair caught up with frontman John Bell to chat about Col. Bruce Hampton, songwriting, the philosophy of communal improvisation, the band’s early days on the frat party circuit, and the virtue of taking a minute to breathe. You can read the conversation below.Otis Sinclair: (After a dropped call) Sorry about that John, crazy morning.John Bell: It promises to get crazier.Otis: The morning’s still young, right?JB: Yup, at least for me [yawns].Otis: Are you an early riser?JB: I’m a medium riser.Otis: Are you a coffee guy?JB: Little bit. Just to get it started, not enough to 4-putt.Otis: No 4-putts. No 3-putts, even. Have you been playing [golf] this year?JB: Not yet. I was hoping to today, but we got a lot of rain.Otis: Widespread Panic had SweetWater 420 Fest in Atlanta last weekend. Looking ahead, you have Trondossa Music & Arts Festival in South Carolina. Now, you’ve recently added your traditional spot on New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival’s second Thursday lineup after the cancellations of both Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac.JB: It was a nice surprise. With the circumstances, wishing everybody a speedy recovery. Mick [Jagger] and Ms. [Stevie] Nicks. All of a sudden, we’re just watching from afar, we had our schedule locked, and we were like “Man, who do you get to replace The Stones?” The answer is, “Nobody!” You don’t think of it that way cause it’s not gonna happen. We just got a call, “If you guys are free, do you want to come play?” It’s as simple as that.Otis: So, Trondossa is next on your list. When will you guys be traveling to South Carolina? Do you have any collaborations in mind?JB: No. We are playing it real loose at this point. Not give ourselves too much to think about. We will pretty much just chit-chat normally and see how our next few weekends are gonna pan out. But it all happens pretty easily without a lot of fanfare.Otis: That’s always how you guys seem to operate—with a business-as-usual, very casual demeanor, but a very intense, very professional performance. None of the coffee house bullshit, just go out there and get it done and play some good old fashion swamp rock and roll.JB: That’s basically the name of the game. You’re going to play the gig. You can’t really make things happen, you can do as much as you can to put yourself in position to have a good show and to communicate well, and stuff like that. But beyond that, you set yourself up for a positive experience and then you also got to lose any rigidity you might have and fall into the music and see where that takes you.Otis: That otherworldly communication. Tapping into that other dimension, it’s very Col. Bruce-like. That connection between the Col. and Widespread Panic is still apparent—Trondossa Music & Arts Festival even takes its name from one of his songs. Going back to the H.O.R.D.E. Tour and before, could you talk about the relationship and history that you guys have with the Colonel?JB: He came into our lives, we knew him just from going to clubs and seeing him play with Tinsley Ellis and various other configurations, The Stained Souls, and Aquarium Rescue Unit. He was also on our first little independent record label, Landslide Records. He had been longtime friends with the [label] president, so we got to know each other that way.We also started doing some gigs together, too. That was the situation, and just by being in each other’s company, all of a sudden, you got a new friend and a new relationship. Again, it happened pretty naturally. Here’s a cat that you have a lot of fun with, you look up to, still look up to him, and he was a good reminder to keep spontaneity and the magic into the experience. Whether you were driving in a van, or if you were playing music. Basically, he was always a reminder to keep your intentions pure and get over yourself.Otis: It seems you embraced a lot of his spirituality and life in another dimension. It’s almost shamanistic the way you improvise your JB-isms or raps or whatever you want to call them. I was wondering if you could touch on how you clear your mind to get into that zone, to focus in on that kind of whacky, anything-can-happen attitude?JB: Sometimes, you just find yourself there. That’s usually when it’s the most genuine. You play in that space while it’s available to you. Then again, if you start naming it or trying to hold on to it or control it, it’ll slip right away from you and you’re back to the mechanics as opposed to the free-flowing. Which is cool, it’s ebb and flow, and not failure of the system. It’s not a given that you’re always in a mode of clarity—communal clarity. You set yourself up to put yourself in that position so you can improvise as eloquently as possible. Like meditation, real slow in and out, if your tension reigns then that’s part of the gig too. And, you know, we got a lot of practice allowing that process to take place. So that helps you reach that place a little more often. But we don’t take it for granted, because it is kind of a special thing, and almost unnameable when you get there. And have fun while you’re there.Otis: There’s plenty of imagery that you create between “hot, hot in the summertime”, the “smell of apple pie”, “the kids running around playing Cowboys & Indians.” It’s very spot-on, and with each one of your additions, it’s almost like a puzzle piece to the full story. Like in “Space Wrangler”, when you say “He passes the jailhouse without tears (‘cus his daddy’s in there).” It’s just a little something that adds to the song that’s unique and helps you appreciate the story behind it and the bigger picture.JB: And the story changes. When you get into an improvisational mode, there are gonna be some similarities. We played these songs before, so some of the same images are gonna reoccur. They are like photographs of your past, those images have come out before and so you might be visiting again, but a lot of times new details come into play. That’s the exciting time when even after twenty years of playing a song, you can close your eyes and the characters come to life and start doing some variations on what they had done in the past. If you’re riding a good wave, musically, then onstage you can kind of capture the development of the story and the characters and report on it. You’re not really writing or making it up, it just kind of happens. Spew some words to describe what you’re seeing in your head. Sometimes, they rhyme. Sometimes, they don’t. Sometimes, you just fall, right on your ass.Otis: Do you have any particular memories, especially of the earlier days, that you would like to talk about?JB: Well, memories don’t always work spontaneously or on command like that. Usually, you kinda putter around through the day and something will trigger a memory or a dream or something that makes you go “Oh, yeah, I remember that!” But what comes to mind a lot is the early, early days. Basically, ’cause your eyes are wide open, and a lot of weird stuff happens. When you’re first starting out, it’s kinda a trip for you and your bandmates. I wouldn’t say “you against the world,” but it’s you in a big ol’ world with surprises around every corner. You get little things like being paid with quarters out of the pool tables at a joint you were playing. A lot of places along the way, a lot of good memories come from folks who used to let our whole crew crash at their place if we were playing in a town a certain weekend. We wouldn’t have been able to do those gigs if it weren’t for those folks extending their hospitalities, ya know, ’cause there was no affording hotel rooms. Dave [Schools]’s mom was a real good one for that. She let us all stay up in the attic on the third floor at her place when we played Richmond, Virginia. We had some friends in Macon who let us crash at their place. And that usually meant doing the gig and then going and partying all night long, and then coming back and playing the next day after eating some local food and healing up a bit.Otis: Sounds almost like the premise of “Diner” right there, waking up on a park bench a little early.JB: That happened a good many times before we got consistent lodging.Otis: From some earlier research, you were in Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity [at University of Georgia] and you played at some fraternity parties. Were those shows at your frat or others?JB: No, it’s interesting ’cause we didn’t play our fraternity ’til later on, way after we graduated out of college. The ones I remember most were in the S.E.C. area. Clemson used to be in the A.C.C. There’d be Clemson, University of Georgia, there were a couple of fraternities that would have us once or twice a year, and that was a big deal cause you’d make a thousand bucks for a gig and that would keep you at Waffle House for a little bit. At club gigs, you get paid by what was coming through the door or some kind of deal that you’d make with the club owner, and sometimes that could just add up to twenty, thirty bucks a piece by the end of the night. So frat gigs sometimes were a little unruly and crazed as the evening wore on, but they did help keep us afloat. Over in Alabama, we had some experiences. It was a lot of work, and sometimes all your gear got really trashed—because of liquor, food, and beer, and people flying around—but it kept us playing.Otis: I was wondering if you cared to talk about the A-Frame House. That is one of the earliest streams on Panicstream.com. Can you talk about the history of the A-Frame House? Did it have any special meaning to you?JB: That was one of the first gigs. Me and Mike [Houser], and later on Dave [Schools] joined us. Just playing at a party and nothing really special, it was just a little different. We had records playing, and, yes, those were the days of records. So a friend of ours, Neal Becton, who I just saw up in D.C. He is a DJ up there. So he say “Come on over, plug in.” We’d play. Those are where you first cut your teeth on performing and getting comfortable in a public setting and seeing how that felt. Very, very, very humble beginnings and a lot of fun, too. I think I remember having to rescue my guitar out of the bonfire a couple of times.Otis: Let’s talk about your slimmed-down touring schedule. You guys went from playing five or six shows a week to three shows a weekend in different cities, which gives you guys some more off-time. With three nights in one city, you have the “same, rowdy crowd” coming back night after night. How do you perceive the difference in the touring these days?JB: It’s a different way to apply yourself. [When] you go in there really fresh and it’s been no more than a month, then you’re still ready to go as far as being familiar with the songs and your hands are all warmed up. I’m not saying we used to pace ourselves, but you just get into a different flow, different rhythm if you are on the road for 8-10 weeks as opposed to leaving home, blowing into a city, and going straight into rock and roll mode for three days and then blow back home for a few weeks. It has its own explosive element of coming out and playing three shows in a city, about 60-70 songs to go filter through and have fun with. Kinda a mini-marathon within those few days.Otis: When I interviewed JoJo [Hermann] recently, he was saying how good it feels playing in the band and how you guys were all gelling right now, how the old songs kept coming back and everything felt really good to play right now. “Bayou Lena” returned in Durham, and “The Waker” came back in Atlanta on New Year’s Eve for the first time since Mikey passed. Can you talk about the decision in bringing that back?JB: It’s not a big decision. You’re not looking for any kind of response or outcome. Very simply, Duane [Trucks] mentioned the song. He started out with this band listening to a lot of our records. So, he picked up on that and said, “Do you guys ever play that?” “Nah, we haven’t since Mikey passed.” And that song was a little personal. It was written by Mikey for his son, Waker. We hadn’t visited that yet, but with Duane’s prompting, we said, “Oh yeah, sure. Let’s do that.” It’s kind of cool to have a song you haven’t played in fifteen, seventeen years, something like that.Otis: Going back to your original collaborations with Mikey, what writing strategies do you employ? Do you like to write in the morning as opposed to the night? Do you always carry a notebook?JB: It’s good to carry something around. Every song has a little voice memo. I used to keep a little handheld, baby recorder. I even used one with the little tapes in them back in the day. In case you had a thought or a melody line or something, you can catch that and go about your day and not worry about trying to remember it. Like having that little notebook in your pocket, if you want to write something down if any inspiration was to come about. Personally, I enjoy waiting for the inspiration and working from that. Sometimes, you push yourself, sit down and try to articulate the ideas brewing and see where the songs go. Kind of push them along. Usually, it’s me, all in the name of discovery, more than actually steering where stuff goes. You start out to write a song but actually the song kinda just takes off on its own. For me, that’s how the songwriting process goes. As far as collaboration goes, you just have to remember to let go a little bit, especially if you got two different people with two different imaginations happening at the same time. You have to let that other person in and let the other ideas in and see how the tune melds together into one scene.Otis: That’s good advice. Are you still writing? “Sundown Betty” is new. You also debuted a new song, “Sacred Moments”, at a talent show in North Carolina. Can you talk about these two songs and how they came together?JB: Same way. You feel like writing a song and you could hear it in your head. So you just put it down in some kind of form, and then play with it a little bit. We have lots of songs in various stages of birth. We have a lot of things that are gestating right now with no real agenda on our part.Otis: Schools has been spending a lot of time producing music, on the other side of the glass in the studio. I’ve been wondering if you’ve been working on other things too or just reading or spending time with the family.That’s basically it. More homebody stuff and relearning how to do that. It’s mid-1980’s, you kind of throw the regular stuff away and just work on the music and the band. All of a sudden, you wake up thirty-five years later, and now I’ve got to relearn how to chill. Or find your life’s purpose. Right now, my life’s purpose is chilling. It’s good to do other things too. No matter what your beliefs are. This is the lifetime I’ve got to work with, and there’s a lot of stuff on the fey line. This is a nice time along with the music, we get to reunite with our friends and take a minute to breathe while you’re sitting on the back porch. It’s pretty cool. It helps you be a little more well-rounded, and you can bring that back into the music, too. That’s the name of the game. We didn’t start playing rock and roll to be slaves to the alarm clock. For sure. It’ll give me a chance to catch up on my mail.Don’t miss John Bell and Widespread Panic at Trondossa Music & Arts Festival on April 27th and April 28th alongside Umphrey’s McGee, The Wood Brothers, The Marcus King Band, and more. For more information, or to grab your tickets today, head here.You can also enter to win a pair of weekend passes in the contest below!last_img read more

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Spend to save

first_imgBy Jeffrey DorfmanUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia is experiencing a budget shortfall that will force cuts of between 5 percent and 10 percent of the state budget. The governor and the General Assembly must consider any opportunity to reduce spending. Cuts of that magnitude won’t be easy to make. Hopefully, the Georgia Land Conservation Program won’t be among the cuts.Most federal and state government programs today are transfer programs. That means they take money from one group and give it to another. Examples include Medicare, Medicaid, economic development subsidies and Social Security. Land preservation is a transfer program because the money comes from sources that may not directly benefit from the preserved land. For example, if Joe Georgian’s tax money is used to preserve privately-owned farmland or a park in an area he’ll likely never visit, Joe may not see a direct benefit. Transfer programs can be unpopular with those on the taking end of the deal.Give and getSome transfer programs are still a good financial deal for taxpayers. For example, health and nutrition programs for pregnant women save taxpayers money because it’s cheaper to provide prenatal care than bear the higher costs associated with low-weight or premature births. In many cases, land preservation programs fall in this category. When farmland is preserved and kept in agricultural or timber production, taxpayers may have a lower total tax bill.If the land is sold to a developer and houses are built on the land, it’s likely that the taxes paid by the new homeowners will be less than the cost of providing services to the new residents. Research strongly supports this. Unless the houses are expensive, between $200,000 and $300,000 in most parts of the state, or the residents have few kids who attend public school, taxpayers probably pay less to preserve the land in one time costs and in annual property tax breaks than they would pay to make up the budget shortfall caused by their new neighbors.When parkland or natural lands are preserved, similar economic scenarios play out. Even better, if the parkland or nature areas are surrounded by development, the surrounding property values rise. Thus, those nearest to the preserved land pay more property taxes, potentially helping to offset some of the cost of the land preservation. Under the Georgia Land Conservation Program local governments must put up some of the money, so these increased property taxes reduce the transfer program nature of the land preservation program even further.Environmental benefitsPreserved land (whether farm, park, timber or just natural) provides environmental amenities. We get cleaner water, cleaner air and stormwater management. While a cleaner environment is likely something most of us value, these environmental benefits are also attractive to our wallets. Rather than having to build government facilities to accomplish these tasks, we get them for free from the preserved land, its soil and plant life. In suburban settings, an acre of trees (such as a wooded, pocket park) can save the local government $1,000 per year in avoided costs. That is, taxpayers don’t have to pay to build stormwater collection or water treatment facilities. These costs are easily overlooked since they’re saved by not appearing in the budget, but taxpayers still should be happy about them.Land preservation programs cost money, both in one time payments such as through the Georgia Land Conservation Program and in annual tax breaks such as the Conservation Use Assessment. In exchange, most Georgians realize they receive the non-monetary benefits of saving these lands, enjoying them and gaining environmental benefits. Few people realize that we usually get some or all of the money spent on land preservation back through lower future taxes due to the land remaining undeveloped. With both the environmental and economic upsides in mind, I hope we preserve and even expand funding for the Georgia Land Conservation Program during these tough budget times.My work on this in Georgia and other programs can be found at the Web site http://landuse.uga.edu. (Jeffrey Dorfman is an economist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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EW! VT’s Holly Lane honored by the Vermont Children’s Trust Foundation

first_imgEverybody Wins! Vermont’s Holly Lane was awarded the Lynne Von Trapp Award by the Vermont Childrens Trust Foundation (VCTF)at their luncheon on June 18.This award is given annually to a staff person of a Vermont Children’s Trust Foundation grant site who was a driving force in establishing or moving the program or organization forward, was responsive to and accurate in meeting the requirements of the VCTF, was a good ambassador for the VCTF and was a positive and optimistic colleague to all. Holly has served in many capacities at EW!VT and has handled nearly all of the grant writing and reporting since arriving in 2004. She was recognized especially for her leadership and dedication in the 2005-2006 school year, which was marked by a series of personnel changes and financial shortfalls. Holly’s determination and perseverance were critical in helping EW! VT emerge from that period with renewed energy. As Hilda Greene from the Vermont Children’s Trust Fund stated, She’s a real superwoman!Everybody Wins! Vermont is a not-for-profit literary and mentoring organization dedicated to encouraging positive attitudes about reading. EW! VT uniquely combines mentoring and literacy programs to help children increase their prospects for success in school and in life through reading. More than 500 EW! VT mentors read with 580 students at 19 schools. For more information, see: www.everybodywinsvermont.org(link is external)last_img read more

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EU ministers recommend ending public funding for oil, gas and coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The European Union should phase out its funding of oil, gas and coal projects, EU finance ministers said in a joint statement on Friday, in a move that could mark a major shift in the bloc’s efforts to combat climate change.It is the first time EU finance ministers have backed a declaration urging an end to fossil fuel funding altogether, having called previously only for an end to funding for coal power plants.An outright phase-out could halt multi-billion-euro financing of fossil fuel projects by the European Investment Bank (EIB), the EU’s financial arm.Last year, the EIB funded nearly 2 billion euros ($2.10 billion) of fossil fuel projects. Since 2013, such funding has amounted to 13.4 billion euros, EIB data show.However, gas projects in Ukraine, Croatia and other EU partners might still be funded after Hungary pushed for a waiver, fearing those countries would otherwise need to rely on Russia, confidential documents seen by Reuters show.Despite being a top financier of worldwide projects aimed at tackling global warming, the EU is ironically also funding fossil fuels, as many of its 28 member states back gas projects to reduce their reliance on nuclear energy or coal.But EU ministers on Friday in a joint statement called on the EIB and other global financial bodies, such as the World Bank, “to phase out financing of fossil fuel projects, in particular those using solid fossil fuels, taking into account the sustainable development, and energy needs, including energy security, of partner countries.”The political declaration needs to be backed up by a formal decision by the EIB board, which is composed by representatives of the 28 EU states.More: Worried by climate change, EU moves to end fossil fuel funding EU ministers recommend ending public funding for oil, gas and coallast_img read more

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Best of the Outdoors 2008: Climbing

first_imgBEST CLIMBING CRAGNew River GorgeThe New River Gorge has more than 2,000 developed routes and more are being sent every year. The gorge is famous for hard, heavily featured sandstone and routes with killer views.“I moved all over the U.S. checking out different climbing areas, but I kept coming back to the New. What makes it unique is the diversity. The Red has good sport climbing, North Carolina has good trad climbing, but the New has it all. It’s the best diversity of climbing in the country. On any given crag inside the gorge, you’ll have great sport and trad climbs, crack, corners. And the difficulty is just as varied, from 5.7 to 5.14.”—Mike Williams, guide at New River Mountain Guides NEXT BEST2. Red River Gorge, Ky.3. Tennessee Wall, Tenn.4. Linville Gorge, N.C.5. Looking Glass, N.C.6. Tallulah Gorge, Ga.7. Sunset Rock, Tenn.8. Seneca Rocks, W.Va.9. Potomac River Gorge, D.C./Md.10. Whitesides Mountain, N.C.FAVORITE CLIMBING ORGANIZATIONSoutheastern Climbers CoalitionThe Southeastern Climbers Coalition fights for climber’s rights in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee, securing access to some of the Southeast’s most cherished crags.“Whenever possible, we purchase climbing spots across the region, but the other side of the equation is making sure we take care of the climbing areas that we do not own—on both private and public lands. To ensure access, climbers have to continue to be good stewards of the land. One of our greatest achievements is energizing climbers to preserve their local crags. Seeing people step up to keep their crags clean and open has been really powerful.” —Paul Morley, climber and board member of Southeastern Climbers CoalitionCLIMBING HERORick WeberMuir Valley Nature Preserve, Ky. Muir Valley Nature Preserve is a privately owned tract of land within the Red River Gorge of Kentucky. Lifelong climber Rick Weber and his wife opened their property specifically to climbers, leading the way for a new realm of private stewardship.What made you decide to open a climbing preserve? We bought it in 2003 with the specific purpose of opening it up as a nature preserve and climbing area. We’re at that point in our lives where we’ve been successful and want to start giving something back.How many climbers visit Muir Valley?It’s growing fast. We got 10,600 visitors last year—almost one-third of all climbers in the Red River Gorge. People come from all over the world, making it the most popular private preserve in the East.You’re retired now—do you still climb?I try to get out a couple of days a week. I’m also a certified guide, so I do some instruction and guiding as well as climbing for fun. It’s a great way to spend our retirement. But it’s a lot of work too. I don’t think some climbers understand that [Muir Valley] is privately owned. They think it’s state owned or something. But I know they appreciate it as a good place to climb.BEST BOULDERING SPOT Rocktown, Ga. Sitting atop Pigeon Mountain, halfway between Chattanooga and Atlanta, Rocktown is full of house-sized sandstone boulders, some of which top out at 40 feet high. Climbs range from sweet beginner’s routes to classic advanced problems.“Rocktown has an underground reputation that’s spreading fast. The variety is incredible. It’s got great problems for everyone from novices to sick climbers. The Orb section alone has everything from 5.0 up to 5.8, and it’s all incredibly classic stuff. —Trey Johanson-Smith, owner of Adrenaline Climbing Gym in Sewanee, Ga. NEXT BEST2. Grandmother Boulders, N.C.3. Horse Pens, Ala.4. Rumbling Bald, N.C.5. Little Rock City, Tenn.6. Beauty Mountain, W.Va.7. Sandrock, Ala.8. Coopers Rock State Forest, W.Va.9. Blowing Rock Boulders, N.C.10. Little River Canyon, Ala.BEST CLIMBING EVENTTriple CrownBouldering SeriesThe series combines three of the most popular bouldering competitions in the Southeast—Hound Ears, Stone Fort, Horse Pens 40—into a single series that attracts the strongest climbers in the country.“The original idea was to raise money for climbing access. We didn’t think it would be this big. We have to cap Hound Ears and Stone Fort, but Horse Pens is open, so this year we’ll have over 750 people at that event. To date, we’ve raised $50,000 for access issues. Some people are into it purely for the competition, but the majority of climbers come because it’s a festival. It’s the one time of year when they get to engross themselves in the climbing community.”—Chad Wylke, co-founder of the Triple Crown Bouldering SeriesNEXT BEST 2. New River Rendezvous, W.Va.3. Red River Reunion, Ky.4. Sand Rock Hoe Down Bouldering Comp, Ala.5. Boulderween, Ala.6. Boat Rock Boulder Competition, Ga.7. Sloperfest, Ala.8. Rocktoberfest, Ky.9. Fall Flash Fest, N.C.10. Escalade Power Series, Ga. last_img read more