Categories
woeyeaocr

Sudan refugees flee intensified bombing runs

first_img Comments   Share   On the second day of their trip, the two teenagers said they encountered the war planes near the town of El-Buram, just south of South Kordofan’s capital, Kadugli. Sitting in Yida just one week later, Mustafa said the planes caught him and Kuwa by surprise. His eyes _ the right is colored by a cloudy white cataract _ darted to the ground as he described what happened.“We didn’t even have time to turn around,” Kuwa said. “As soon as we heard the plane, we dropped down and the bombs hit.”When the two stood up, they found that six people from the group they were walking with had been injured. One had been killed. The bombing took place a 30-minute walk away from El-Buram. There were a few scattered houses along the way but they were mostly empty. “Those people were already in Yida,” Mustafa said.Ryan Boyette, a former American aid worker who now lives in the Nuba Mountains of South Kordofan, said Wednesday that Sudanese war planes have dropped 81 bombs on 11 villages since early August. He believes Sudan is increasing its attacks to discourage the implementation of a humanitarian agreement signed Aug. 4 that would see aid deliveries to the region. Top holiday drink recipes Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Top Stories How do cataracts affect your vision? Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement “We are expecting all the people to come. No one will remain behind because the war is going on and the bombings are still going,” he explained.When the war started, many residents _ especially children _ remained behind to continue with school and help elderly and sickly residents who could not make the journey. There were no schools in Yida, and some children who came earlier even returned to South Kordofan to continue their education. Now community leaders like Kafi say most of the schools in the war-torn region have closed, while dozens have opened in Yida.Kafi also represents Mustafa and Kuwa. It was in front of Kafi’s new, makeshift home in Yida where the pair explained that they also came for school. A wizened man with a beard and a clean white cap atop his head, Kafi says he is grateful that the two survived the journey.After the bombing in El-Buram, the teens rested briefly before continuing south. Again the two encountered Antonovs just outside of El-Buram, but the planes did not drop bombs.The rainy season has made the roads into the camp nearly impassable, but people are still arriving. With ongoing fighting and the resulting hunger, the U.N. refugee agency believes there could be an additional 15,000 refugees in the camp by the end of the year. If the war continues, community leaders say such an influx is likely. Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion projectlast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *