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Maxine Heasty of Mayfield lived a life of collecting handkerchiefs and they are now on display at the Wellington library

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — A legacy is defined as something that is handed down by a predecessor from a previous generation to another. If someone was to invent a time machine and visit a young Maxine in the 1930s or 40s, she may be surprised one of her legacies would be the collection of her handkerchiefs.Maxine HeastyMaxine (Stocking) Heasty of Mayfield died on Aug. 3, 2013 at the age of 96. She left behind three sons, six grandchildren and five great grandchildren. She also left behind an impressive array of handkerchiefs, which is now on display at the Wellington Public Library.“100 years of handkerchiefs,” is a story in itself, marking some of the nation’s historical moments and fads throughout a century of nose blowing. Unbeknownst to her family, Maxine would collect and save handkerchiefs. Why? Even the family is not quite sure. But today it is a tremendous display of an era gone by.Not so long ago, before paper Kleenexes took over the world, a woman would carry a handkerchief in her purse. It was a mom’s duty. Junior would have a runny nose or Suzie spilled ice cream on her Sunday dress, out would come the handkerchief. It was second nature to the World War I and II generation.Daryl Heasty, one of Maxine’s son, guessed a handkerchief, would cost about a nickel, and his mom always had one around. What he didn’t know, she never threw one away either — or a least the special ones.This collection of handkerchiefs was lost on the family until just recently when Mary Heasty, Terry’s wife and Maxine’s daughter in law, made a startling discovery. Mary was going through Maxine’s closets trying to get rid of non-essential items. In her pursuit of the cleaning task, she came across over 150 handkerchiefs in a cardboard box. They ranged from the earliest part of the century. There were some from World War 1 and World War II. Many were commemorative, and some were hand stitched.“It was like a treasure hunt for me,” Mary said about the discovery. “The colors are still brilliant as the day they were made.”Mary also discovered some of these handkerchiefs are worth some money. She went online and discovered, a handkerchief in that box, probably sold for a nickel, but can fetch up to $40 today. Yes, old-timers, you can hit your forehead with your palm now.Mary said she washed some of the handkerchiefs in delicate mode in the washing machine, but started to see some of the color run out of some of the pieces of cloth, so she stopped. This wasn’t your average collection.The Heasty family decided this was something the Sumner County community needed to see, as a way to remember Maxine and the kind of person she was. A sample of those handkerchiefs are on display at the public library for at least a month – through November.Maxine had lived in the Mayfield area her whole life. She graduated from Wellington High School in 1934. She would teach grade school at Mayfield for two years and in Sumner County for 35 years. She married Gene Heasty in 1945, and had her three sons Larry, Terry and Daryl.How many handkerchiefs she used to wipe up the messes of those three boys, even she probably could not say. But those handkerchiefs are now a legacy to a generation of purse less, cell-phone carrying, Puff kleenex nose blowing citizens, who never had to worry about carrying around a handkerchief.Unlucky us. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (5) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +1 Vote up Vote down Sherry Kline · 354 weeks ago Great story, Tracy!! Maxine was my cousin, and a very special lady!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 354 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Kim · 354 weeks ago Beautiful collection! Report Reply 0 replies · active 354 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Cindy Harris -Eagle · 353 weeks ago Mrs. Heasty was my 5th grade social studies teacher at Lincoln Elementary School. She was my favorite teacher EVER! Years after grade school, when I had my own children, she still remembered me and always spoke when I would see her somewhere. I was sad to see that she has passed away, but she is certainly not forgotten here. Report Reply 0 replies · active 353 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Raymond Young · 353 weeks ago Mary and Terry Heasty are my aunt and uncle. Maxine was a great lady she was always so nice when I was growing up. Report Reply 0 replies · active 353 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Sara · 325 weeks ago When I started dating Daryl back in the 70’s, she really wasn’t crazy about me. I think now though she might appreciate me now. God Bless her, and her family. My mother-in-law embroiders kitchen towels for all my children, and I now how special they are. An era gone past, but so thankful to have her talent. Love they past!!!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 325 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. 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