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Family friend of missing Colorado mom pleads for help in search

first_imgWoodland Park Police Department(WOODLAND PARK, Colo.) — It’s been nearly three weeks since Kelsey Berreth, a young mother from Colorado, went missing, but her family and friends said they refuse to give up hope.“There’s gotta be somebody that saw something go on there, and if they would get in contact with the police department, so they can get to the bottom … that would be the greatest thing,” Jim Morgan, a close friend of the Berreth family, told ABC News’ Good Morning America on Thursday. “God is powerful and he answers prayers, and I’m just encouraging everybody to lift the family up, lift Kelsey up in prayer.”Berreth, a 29-year-old pilot, was last seen entering a Safeway near her home in Woodland Park, Colorado, on Nov. 22, according to surveillance footage from the store, but her fiancé, Patrick Frazee, said he saw her later that day.Berreth’s mother reported her missing on Dec. 2, police said. The FBI confirmed on Tuesday it’s assisting local authorities in the search.“Three weeks is a long time to be missing,” Morgan said. “We still have hope that she’ll be back and God will bring her back to us, but we certainly can’t guarantee that.”Morgan said he’s known the Berreth family for almost two decades.“In this world, good things don’t always happen, miracles don’t always happen, but fortunately God is with us through it anyway,” he added.Morgan described Berreth as a loving, caring, kind woman — someone who would do anything for her loved ones.“She was my son’s first babysitter, and he really liked her. That speaks highly to her character,” Morgan added. “Her dad is one of my best friends at this point, and we are talking regular trying to help him through a really tough time.”Neighbors and friends are scheduled to hold a candlelight vigil at Memorial Park in Woodland Park Thursday night, according to the Woodland Park Police Department.The footage of Berreth at the Safeway, released by police Tuesday night, showed her entering with her baby in a car seat and getting a shopping cart. It’s the last confirmed sighting of her.There were no leads or suspects as of early Thursday.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Tony Stewart among those added to NASCAR Hall of Fame nominee list

first_imgThe five nominees for the Landmark Award, listed alphabetically, are as follows…Edsel Ford II, Ford Motor CompanyAlvin Hawkins, NASCAR’s first flagman; established NASCAR racing at Bowman Gray Stadium with Bill France Sr.Mike Helton, the first non-France family member to be named NASCAR presidentDr. Joseph Mattioli, founder of Pocono RacewayRalph Seagraves, formed groundbreaking Winston-NASCAR partnership as executive with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyHolly Cain writes for the NASCAR Wire Service. Stewart may join one of his former rivals and one of this year’s new inductees, four-time Cup champion Jeff Gordon, who was chosen for the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.MORE: 2019 Hall class unique in one distinct wayAlso newly added to the esteemed list released Wednesday are Bonnett, a popular member of the “Alabama Gang”; NASCAR Xfinity Series pioneer and two-time champion Sam Ard; early Daytona 500 winner Marvin Panch; short-track master Jim Paschal; and the sport’s first “master mechanic,” Red Vogt. A nominating committee representing NASCAR, the NASCAR Hall of Fame, track owners and the media selected the new slate of names.There are three new nominees for the prestigious Landmark Award as well, including Edsel Ford II, Mike Helton and Dr. Joe Mattioli, who join returning nominees Alvin Hawkins and Ralph Seagraves. This award honors competitors; “those working in the sport as a member of a racing organization, track facility, race team, sponsor, media partner”; or someone considered “a general ambassador for the sport through a professional or non-professional role.”Here is the full list of nominees for the NASCAR Hall of Fame (listed alphabetically):Sam Ard, NASCAR Xfinity Series pioneer and two-time championBuddy Baker, won 19 times in the NASCAR Cup Series, including the Daytona 500 and Southern 500Neil Bonnett, won 18 times in the NASCAR Cup Series, including consecutive Coca-Cola 600 winsRed Farmer, three-time Late Model Sportsman champion; 1956 Modified championRay Fox, legendary engine builder, crew chief and car ownerHarry Gant, winner of 18 NASCAR Cup Series races, including two Southern 500 victoriesJoe Gibbs, combined for nine car owner championships in Cup and Xfinity seriesJohn Holman, won two NASCAR Cup Series championships as co-owner of Holman-Moody RacingHarry Hyde, 1970 NASCAR Cup Series championship crew chiefBobby Labonte, won a championship in both the Cup Series and Xfinity SeriesHershel McGriff, 1986 NASCAR west series championRalph Moody, won two NASCAR Cup Series championships as co-owner of Holman-Moody RacingMarvin Panch, won 17 times in the NASCAR Cup Series, including the 1961 Daytona 500Jim Paschal, 23 of his 25 NASCAR Cup Series wins came on short tracksLarry Phillips, only five-time NASCAR weekly series national championRicky Rudd, won 23 times in NASCAR Cup Series, including the 1997 Brickyard 400Mike Stefanik, winner of record-tying nine NASCAR championshipsTony Stewart, three-time NASCAR Cup Series champion, two-time Brickyard 400 winnerRed Vogt, the first master mechanic of NASCAR, and a founding memberWaddell Wilson, won three NASCAR Cup Series championships as an engine builder DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Three-time Cup champion Tony Stewart and the late Neil Bonnett are among the list of new nominees eligible for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.Five inductees from a list of 20 nominees will be chosen for the 2020 induction class on Voting Day, Wednesday, May 22 — the list of new honorees decided on by both the NASCAR Hall of Fame Voting Panel and a nationwide fan vote on NASCAR.com.last_img read more

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Suarez thanks Liverpool for helping him to the top

first_imgFILE PHOTO: Luis SuarezLiverpool, United Kingdom | AFP | Barcelona striker Luis Suarez returns to Anfield on Tuesday hoping to dump Liverpool out of the Champions League semi-finals, but remains eternally grateful to the Reds for helping him win a move to the Catalan giants.Suarez shone on the field during a turbulent three-and-a-half years at Liverpool, that included long bans for biting Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic and racially abusing Patrice Evra of Manchester United.His role in leading Liverpool to the brink of a long-awaited Premier League title in 2013/2014 saw Barca splash out a then club record fee despite another biting incident on Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini at the 2014 World Cup that saw him banned by FIFA for four months.That faith has been rewarded as Suarez has enjoyed great success in Spain, winning four La Liga titles, the Champions League in 2014/15 and four Spanish Cups.And he believes his time at Liverpool was the springboard to making him one of the world’s best strikers.“Liverpool gave me a lot to make me better. My time there made me more professional, make me improve technically, many things,” he said on Monday.“To be captain of Liverpool was something unique in my career. We were fighting for the Premier League and you are left with the sensation we were just one step away.“I am among the elite of football, I am at Barcelona, thanks to what Liverpool made me as a player.” Suarez scored the opening goal against his old club as Barca took a commanding 3-0 first leg lead last week to defend at Anfield.However, he warned the Spanish champions of making the same mistakes they did in throwing away a 4-1 lead against Roma in last season’s Champions League quarter-finals and knows that Liverpool can be a different team on home soil.“We have come off the blow of last season when we had a good advantage (from the first leg). We have thought about that a lot and we know that they have an extra edge here in front of their fans.“To play at Anfield is like playing with an extra man for what the fans transmit to the Liverpool players.”However, if Liverpool are to spring an unlikely comeback, it will be without two of their major goal threats as Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino miss out through injury.“Firmino and Salah are important players for them, but that does not change our preparation for the game,” added Suarez.“They have other players, most of them internationals and we need to pay them plenty respect.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Florida woman accused of killing boyfriend by zipping him up in suitcase

first_imgOrlando police say a woman is facing murder charges after allegedly zipping up her boyfriend inside a suitcase.On Monday police responded to a phone call reporting a man, Jorge  Torres, 42, dead.42-year-old Sarah Boone told police she put Torress in a suitcase during a game of hide-and-seek.Boone said they were drinking alcohol, and she passed out in her bed while he was still in the suitcase.Investigators searched her phone and found videos showing Torres yelling from inside the suitcase saying he couldn’t breathe. Boone can be heard laughing and saying, “that’s what I feel like when you cheat on me” and yelling obscenities.She is facing second-degree murder charges.Arrested: Sarah Boone, 42, for Second Degree Murder in the death of 42-year-old Jorge Torres Jr., who died after Boone zipped him into a suitcase, and didn’t return for hours. pic.twitter.com/JCHWG7WNkp— Orange County Sheriff’s Office (@OrangeCoSheriff) February 26, 2020last_img read more

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Williams, Duggan weigh in on US soccer discrimination suit

first_imgThe 28 members of the current women’s player pool filed the lawsuit Friday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. The USSF has not commented on the suit.“We believe it is our duty to be the role models that we’ve set out to be and fight to what we know we legally deserve,” forward Christen Press told The Associated Press. “And hopefully in that way it inspires women everywhere.”The lawsuit, which is the culmination of long-simmering concerns by the players, highlights the struggle for female athletes globally to achieve fair compensation for their efforts, even if that doesn’t mean identical paychecks to their male counterparts. “Fair” can include simple things like access to practice fields and changing rooms.In tennis, Grand Slam events and many other tournaments give equal prize money to men and women, in part due to the work of pioneers like Billie Jean King, who was calling for equitable prize money in the 1970s. She once famously proclaimed: “Everyone thinks women should be thrilled when we get crumbs, and I want women to have the cake, the icing and the cherry on top, too.”Two years ago, just before the U.S. women’s soccer team struck a new collective bargaining agreement that gave players pay raises and better benefits, the women’s national hockey team won a better contract after taking the drastic step of threatening to sit out of the world championships. The players’ effort went viral with the social media hashtag #BeBoldForChange.Meghan Duggan was one of the players who led the fight.“I have the utmost respect for the U.S. women’s soccer team and what they have always stood for,” she said. “They have continued to lead the way in advancing women’s sports and this is just another example of their boldness and leadership.”The men’s and women’s soccer teams have separate collective bargaining agreements, and their pay is structured differently. That means there is no simple dollar-to-dollar salary comparison. Terms of the CBAs have not been made public.Compensation for the women includes a guaranteed salary and salaries paid by the USSF for their time with clubs in the National Women’s Soccer League. The men get paid based on appearances, roster selection for friendlies and tournaments, and collective performance. The USSF has cited the contracts, as well as the revenue generated by the teams, as the reason for the differences.While the U.S. Women’s National Team Players Association is not a party to the lawsuit, it issued a statement supporting the players’ goal of “eliminating gender-based discrimination by USSF.”A group of five star players filed a complaint in 2016 with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that alleged wage discrimination by the federation. The new lawsuit effectively ends that EEOC complaint, brought by Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, Becky Sauerbrunn, Carli Lloyd and former goalkeeper Hope Solo. The players received a right-to-sue letter from the EEOC last month.At the time of the original complaint, U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut led a bipartisan group of lawmakers in a letter to the EEOC in support of the players. On Sunday, she applauded the team’s ongoing efforts for pay equity.“These women are at the pinnacle of their sport. They are world champions. Yet, when they receive their paychecks, they are being paid less than their male counterparts. That is unacceptable,” she said in a statement to the AP. “Women and men in the same job deserve the same pay. Period. That is why I will keep pushing Congress to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act, which should be on the House Floor soon.”Following the EEOC action, the women took the fight for equality into contract negotiations and struck a new CBA covering 2017-21.WNBA players have exercised their right to terminate their CBA after the 2019 season, cutting the deal short by two years. The move allows the sides to negotiate a new deal that would go into effect for the 2020 season during an Olympic year.“Without commenting on the specifics of the lawsuit, the WNBPA stands for equity and fairness, and stands against discrimination of any kind. We are proud to stand with the USWNTPA and other unions in support of players on these issues,” said Terri Jackson, WNBA Players Association director of operations.Solo no longer plays for the national team. Her contract was terminated when she was suspended for comments made at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. However, she continues to champion gender equity issues.Last August, she filed her own federal lawsuit in the Northern District of California, accusing U.S. Soccer of violating the Equal Pay Act. That lawsuit is winding its way through the courts.“I’d always hoped my former teammates would follow suit and join me in the battle in federal court against the United States Soccer Federation,” Solo told the AP. “It was clear that U.S. Soccer was never going to acquiesce or negotiate to provide us equal pay or agree to treat us fairly. The filing by the entire United Sates women’s national team demonstrated that they no longer fear the federation by forcefully and publicly acknowledging U.S. Soccer’s violations of the Equal Pay Act and Title VII.”___AP Sports Writers Beth Harris in Los Angeles, Larry Lage in Detroit and Doug Feinberg in Las Vegas contributed to this report.___More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports United States’ Tobin Heath, second from right, is congratulated on her goal by Mallory Pugh (11), Megan Rapinoe and Alex Morgan (13) during the first half of a SheBelieves Cup soccer match against Brazil Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Mike Carlson) While Serena Williams admittedly doesn’t follow soccer, the U.S. women’s national team caught her attention with its lawsuit seeking equitable pay. In this Aug. 13, 2018, file photo, Serena Williams serves to Daria Gavrilova, of Australia, in the first round at the Western & Southern Open in Mason, Ohio. Williams admits she doesn’t really follow soccer, but the U.S. women’s national team got her attention with its lawsuit over equitable pay. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File) The players accuse the U.S. Soccer Federation of “institutionalized gender discrimination” that includes unequal pay with their counterparts on the men’s national team.At the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California, Williams praised the players who came before her to fight for equal prize money in tennis.“I think at some point, in every sport, you have to have those pioneers, and maybe it’s the time for soccer,” she said. “I’m playing because someone else stood up, and so what they are doing right now is hopefully for the future of women’s soccer.”last_img read more