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The xx Announces First Album Since 2012, Shares Leading Single [Listen]

first_imgI See You Tracklist:01. Dangerous02. Say Something Loving03. Lips04. A Violent Noise05. Performance06. Replica07. Brave For You08. On Hold09. I Dare You10. Test Me11. Naive (Bonus Track)12. Seasons Run (Bonus Track)13. Brave For You (Marfa Demo) (Bonus Track) English indie pop band The xx have announced a new album I See You, set to release January 13th, 2017. The LP marks their third studio album following their 2009 debut album xx and 2012’s Coexist. The new record was recorded between March 2014 and August 2016 between New York, Los Angeles, London, and Reykjavik.This announcement comes in light of the recent shift in American pride. “We know these are uncertain times and we hope the joy & love we found making the record will get out into the world, in however small a way,” the band explained with the album’s announcement. To further accompany the excitement of their most recent work, The xx have shared the album’s leading single “On Hold.” As Pitchfork notes, the track samples the 1981 hit by Hall and Oates, “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do).” Take a listen to the new track below:last_img read more

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Peach Research

first_imgThe late-March cold spell caused some Georgia peach growers to lose a portion of their crop, but consumers should see a typical selection of fruit when the first Georgia-grown varieties ripen this month, said University of Georgia scientist Dario Chavez. “We should see pretty much the same season as usual,” said Chavez, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researcher, hired a year ago to study Georgia’s peach crop and work closely with the state’s growers. “We lost some volume, but across the board, the crop looks good.”Peaches, like blueberries, need cold weather to move into and out of dormancy. The amount of cold they need is referred to as “chill hours,” or the number of hours below 45-degree temperatures the tree receives, he said. “Last fall we started having cold weather and the trees started to shut down. Once that happens, temperatures go down and the tree begins to accumulate chill hours from October to February,” Chavez explained.This year, Georgia peach trees got the average number of chill hours they needed.“All the trees got their required chill and then, as soon as it got a little warmer, the trees moved really fast and started flowering around the middle of March,” he said.Most Georgia peaches are grown in middle Georgia, down Highway 19 toward Fort Valley. “The first peaches that will come in will be Flavorich and Carored (varieties) around May 18. From then on, the flood gates will open until the end of August,” Chavez said.The Elberta peach was—and still is, for some—the favorite variety among Georgians based on its reputation and size. Today, Chavez is working with consumers’ taste preferences in mind, not the size of the peach or the number each tree produces.“If you ask people from Georgia which peach is their favorite, they will say O’Henry or Elberta (varieties). Peach eaters have their preferences, but there has to be some reason that they like that variety,” he said. Over the years, unique peach flavors have been lost because breeders have focused on yield, he said. At grocery stores, consumers can see the state where the peaches were grown, but not always the variety name.“Commercially, you don’t know which ones you are buying. But Georgia consumers may know when certain varieties should be ripe and they may have even picked them at a you-pick farm,” Chavez said.Chavez is building the UGA peach research program from the ground up on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. He grafted 300 peach trees last June, including 120 different varieties that grow well in the Southeast.Approximately 800 trees will soon be planted on the UGA Dempsey Farm in Griffin, in what will become Chavez’s research orchard. “There are some old-time varieties and some of the more popular, newer varieties,” he said.In the fall, he will use the new orchard to study irrigation systems’ delivery of fertilizer. “This would save the amount of fertilizer used, bring a lot of savings to the farmers and reduce environmental impact. California has tight water regulations and Georgia is probably headed that way, too,” he said. Chavez aims to have water management plans for peach trees ready to share with farmers when drought conditions occur.To search for breeding stock that consumers will like, Chavez is working with UGA sensory specialist Koushik Adhikari to evaluate consumer perception and preference to multiple peach varieties.“Basically, we are searching for the building blocks. Once we identify consumer preferences, we will start to breed new peach varieties with those compounds and characteristics in collaboration with Chunxian Chen, the USDA-ARS Fruit and Nut Research Lab’s peach scion breeder in Byron, Georgia,” he said.With UGA weed scientist Mark Czarnota, Chavez is monitoring the effects of long-term herbicide use on tree health, roots and performance.“We have also found some persistent weeds growing near peach trees. We need to know if there is a compound that will control these weeds because they can really dramatically reduce production,” he said.Chavez works closely with peach growers through the Georgia Peach Council and the Georgia Agricultural Commodity Commission for Peaches. “Statistics say we have 224 peach growers in Georgia, but five growers grow about 90 percent of the acreage in the state,” he said.Georgia devotes 11,998 acres to peaches with a farm gate value of more than $55.4 million, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. The top producing counties in 2013 were Crawford, Peach, Macon, Taylor, Meriwether and Schley.last_img read more

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Senate to Blame for UC Delays, Layoffs

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Senate to Blame for UC Delays, Layoffs Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: Jeff Sheridan, Press Secretary The Blog For more than six months, the Wolf Administration has been working extensively with the Legislature to fund the Service Improvement and Infrastructure Fund, which supports technology upgrades, benefit modernization and unemployment compensation call center functions among other things. House Bill 2375, which would have funded the system, passed the House in overwhelming, bipartisan fashion and was approved by two Senate committees with bipartisan votes.However, Senator Scott Wagner led the charge to stop a vote on the bill — which would have funded the system — and thereby decided to make it harder for working class people who have lost their jobs to pay their bills, put food on the table, and find new employment. Additionally, because the Senate did not take a vote on the bill, more than 500 unemployment compensation call center employees will lose their jobs.If the Senate had followed through on their promises to pass this critical legislation, Governor Wolf would have swiftly signed the bill, which would have kept the call centers open and saved the hundreds of jobs in the call centers.Governor Wolf cannot sign a bill that is not on his desk.The Wolf Administration has been open and transparent and has provided information to the Legislature about this issue since January 2016. Their decision to hurt working families and not vote on this bill is the is why the people of Pennsylvania lack confidence in their Legislature.Governor Wolf has urged Senate Republicans to act on the reauthorization of this legislation as soon as possible so that the impact to those facing furloughs can be mitigated to the greatest extent possible.Every person that will be laid off, every single unemployment insurance payment that is delayed, and every call that is not answered is unfortunately due to the lack of action by and a failure to pass this bill before the legislature went home for the holidays. SHARE TWEET December 13, 2016last_img read more

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Dyche hails improving Clarets

first_img It took the Clarets until the fourth month of the season to finally register their first victory but, buoyed by that early November success over Hull, they have taken eight points from the last 12 available and are only in the Barclays Premier League’s bottom three on goal difference. A win at Loftus Road on Saturday afternoon would definitely elevate them out of that lowly trio as Hull face West Brom, and Dyche insists the recent mini purple patch which Burnley are enjoying is a reflection of their ability to kick on. “It just goes to show you how tough the league is. You look at ourselves, QPR, Leicester – all come up, all full of beans, all looking forward to the challenge, different amounts of money, player trading, but all still finding it really tough because it is a very, very tough division.” Even if Burnley exit the bottom three come Saturday tea-time, Dyche will not stray far from the one-game-at-a-time mentality which served his troops so well during their promotion last term. “We know what the journey is, it’s important we focus on that, not what a piece of paper says at this stage,” he said of the league table. “It’s when you get down to the end that it really counts and that’s the way I work anyway. It’s how we went about our business last season and it served us well. “It kept the players focused on the next game; no matter who that is, the performance is key and the outcome usually comes with good performances.” The Clarets are likely to be without defensive duo Stephen Ward and Michael Duff once again, with the former set to see a specialist on Friday over an ankle problem which is proving more serious than the club first feared. “Most of my messages have been pretty much the same,” he said. “Early season a lot was made of us not winning but I thought our performances were good. I said ‘you’ve got to go even harder than just giving good performances at this level’ and I think we’ve done that. “We’ve certainly deserved the points we’ve got, we arguably should have nicked all three against (Aston) Villa in terms of the chances we created and Newcastle are a good side so we can’t be too greedy. “The mentality is good, it’s growing from the fact they’re not just winning and getting points on the board, but from playing in the Premier League. That growth is quite apparent at the moment. There’s a lot of games in front of us.” Burnley and QPR are familiar foes having played each in their respective promotion campaigns in the Sky Bet Championship last season and it is those two, along with fellow new boys Leicester, who occupy the three lowest rungs on the Premier League ladder. Dyche believes that epitomises the quality of the division they all entered back in August. He added of QPR: “They’re back in the Premier League, spent a lot of money and got a very experienced group. “People are probably surprised where they are a little bit. I’m not suggesting Harry or his men think they should be right up the top of the league but o n paper they’ve got a strong group. Sean Dyche has credited his Burnley players with finding another level in recent weeks as they look to build on a four-game unbeaten streak at QPR this weekend. Press Associationlast_img read more