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Outdoor Updates: Global CO2 levels are at record levels

first_imgCarbon dioxide, the gas mainly responsible for global warming, has reached levels on earth not seen in 3 million years. Scientists used computer simulations of our planet’s past and compared them to data from the deep sea. The findings showed that the last time carbon dioxide on Earth was so elevated the sea level was 65 feet higher and trees grew on Antarctica. Today’s CO2 levels are 410 parts per million. Scientists note that even trace amounts in the atmosphere raise global temperatures and that the levels cannot be explained by natural factors. All of the world’s nations, except the United States, have joined the Paris climate agreement with the goal of lowering carbon dioxide emissions and stopping the rise in global temperature. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to move California condors into the Pacific Northwest The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to establish an experimental population of the California condor in the Pacific Northwest. Data shows that reintroduction of the California condor into northern regions is biologically feasible and will help to conserve the species. The California condor is the largest land bird in North America and can live up to 60 years. When humans began settling the Americas, California condors lived throughout much of the continent but by 1987 the bird was listed as extinct in the wild due to poaching, habitat destruction and lead poisoning. Numbers grew through captive breeding programs and in 1991 the birds were reintroduced back into the wild. They remain one of the world’s most rare birds. As of 2017 there were 463 total living California condors.center_img Global carbon dioxide levels are higher than they’ve been in 3 million yearslast_img read more

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E-mentoring helps guide law students into the profession

first_img October 15, 2003 Managing Editor Regular News E-mentoring helps guide law students into the profession E-mentoring helps guide law students into the professioncenter_img Mark D. Killian Managing EditorMentoring is classically defined as a process by which an older and more experienced person takes a younger person under his or her wing, freely offering advice, support, and encouragement.In a new twist on the old mentoring concept, the Bar’s Standing Committee on Professionalism has launched an e-mentoring program, matching experienced lawyers with the lawyers of tomorrow — law students.More than 1,000 law students have already signed up for the project, which pairs students with experienced lawyers willing to share stories and give advice via e-mail, said Katherine Silverglate, chair of The Florida Bar Standing Committee on Professionalism.What the committee needs now is more lawyers to volunteer to be mentors.The goal, Silverglate said, is to provide a safety net for young lawyers before they leave law school, before they pass the bar, and before they take on the responsibility of representing the interests of clients in Florida.Silverglate said today’s students need the advice of working lawyers who have on the job experience. While Florida law students get top notch legal training from their academic programs, they need the benefit of experience to find out what else they need once they become lawyers, she said.But why e-mentoring? Because it is often difficult to find the time to meet face-to-face, given the busy schedules of lawyers and students. Silverglate said e-mentoring has the advantage of transcending geographic boundaries and time constraints. Online you can meet anytime.“The easy thing is in an e-relationship you never have to do anything other than answer e-mails,” Silverglate said. “The world was not ready for an e-mentoring project five years ago, but now it is.”Originally, the program was introduced as the Mentor Attorney Professionalism Program, a CLE program for mentors and a voluntary project for young lawyers. The problem was the committee couldn’t convince young lawyers that they really needed a mentor, Silverglate said. So, on the advice of committee member Henry Latimer, the committee decided that instead of waiting until a lawyer has actually started to practice without the guidance of a mentor, it would work to make sure that each law student in Florida has the opportunity to be matched with a mentor.“The exciting thing is the little spark has turned into a flame, and now we are facing a raging fire,” Silverglate said.To get word of the program out to students and possible mentors, Silverglate has traveled to most of the state’s law schools and a number of voluntary bar associations to present a one-hour dramatic monologue titled the “Many Fabulous Hats a Lawyer Wears.” Silverglate dons 36 hats and goes into different characters. Each hat represents roles lawyers play, such as counselor, firefighter, police officer, teacher, and magician to name a few — “All the things you have to balance as a lawyer.”“I gave a speech at the University of Miami and every student in the room signed up, and then the dean called me up about two days later and said the news spread like wildfire about this opportunity and there were 125 more students who did not attend the presentation who wanted to participate,” she said.Silverglate said the Bar has created a computer program, and as soon as a student’s name goes into the system it goes into a waiting bay, and as soon as a mentor goes into a system they are instantly matched and an e-mail goes to each saying, “Congratulations, a mentor has been chosen for you,” and the e-mail addresses are exchanged.“We need to get law students’ attention and make them aware of professionalism issues before they start practicing,” Silverglate said. “Just having an e-relationship with somebody, where you can ask real questions to a practicing lawyer who knows what the day-to-day demands are, is an incredible opportunity for law students.”The Center for Professionalism helps to facilitate the relationship by once a month sending discussion prompts to the mentors and proteges, such as articles that discuss something that happened in a case or something that is happening in the legislature that will affect the profession.“If they have an idea to talk about then, suddenly, it blossoms into a conversation,” Silverglate said.Silverglate said many students have no idea about the magnitude of changes their lives will face once they become lawyers.“In school they focus on academics and getting a job,” Silverglate said. “If a student focuses on the balance part of it, she is still going to be a mom; she is still going to be a wife; she is talking to a real person who is still wearing all of those hats and will make the student aware of balancing those issues.”Silverglate said the Committee on Professionalism is also trying to get local bars to encourage their members to serve as mentors. She said the Florida chapter of ABOTA recently volunteered all of its qualified members to serve as mentors. ­­ “We need whole organizations to volunteer their people to participate in this because we are changing the whole culture [of the profession],” Silverglate said, noting students who participate will come out of school with a new level of understanding and perspective on the profession.To become an e-mentor you must have been a Bar member for seven years or longer (although the committee will consider those with five to seven years experience), be in good standing with the Bar, and “really want to do it,” Silverglate said.“People complain all the time about how the system is broken and how we need to fix it,” Silverglate said. “This is an absolute winner with a low time commitment and high return. For all those complainers out there who want to change the practice of law and pass on to the next generation the right way to do it, now is your chance.”To become an e-mentor, log on to www.flabar.org. Once there, click on “Professionalism,” which appears in the left hand blue filed. Then click on the “I want to be a mentor” link. Once you have read and signed off on the requirements, enter your name and Bar number. You will then receive a confirmation e-mail and the name and e-mail address of your protege.last_img read more

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Wellington City Council forum: Lannon Taylor

first_img2. What is the main reason why you are running for Wellington City Council?Taylor: Having been appointed to the city council upon the departure of former councilman John Holmes, I feel there are issues that have not been completed, issues that still need to be addressed and a desire to assist when possible with the issues facing the city of Wellington.3. Losing businesses is an ongoing concern to the community of Wellington. What do you as a city council member believe you can do to stop the exodus and enhance business growth?Taylor: Continue to reach out to other businesses across the nation and invite them to look at Wellington as a possible point of relocation.Also to continue to work with local retailer’s to asses what problems are facing the local businesses and what we as a city council can do to assist local businesses. by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Lannon Taylor is a Wellington City Council incumbent running for one of six “at large” positions on the newly restructured board.Registered voters within the Wellington city limits can vote in this race which will have 15 candidates on the ballot. The top three vote-getters will receive four-year terms. The second three will receive two-year terms.Voters can vote for up to six candidates. They can vote for one candidate, two candidates, three, four, five or six – but nothing more.The city/school election will be held on Tuesday, April 2. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. at the Raymond Frye Complex. People can also advance vote at the Sumner County Clerk’s office.The following is a list of questions submitted to Taylor.1. Tell us about yourself.Taylor: I served in the United State Marine Corp from 1972-1976. I was also on the Wichita Police Department from 1977-1978, Kansas Highway Patrol from 1979-2004 before retiring. I then worked on the Kansas Turnpike Authority from 2005 -present.My educations includes graduating from Wichita SouthEast High School, getting a B.S. Administration of Justice degree from W.S.U. I also had post graduate work at W.S.U.I’ve been a Wellington resident from 1993 until present. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments 5. Staying with water, because of the current drought, the water level is low at the Wellington City Lake. Do you favor other alternative water sourcing, or do you believe we should remain status quo on our water resources? Also, will you ever be in favor of water rationing?Taylor: I am not currently in favor of alternative water sourcing. Yes I am in favor of water rationing and always in favor of water conservation.6. The total assessed valuation in Wellington went down in 2012, but may remain constant or improve with the inclusion of Wal-Mart on the tax roll in 2013. However, this may not be the case in the next four years. If Wellington has a lower assessed value as the previous year, how would you as a council member respond to the lack of tax revenue for the municipality?Taylor: We would need to access the city’s current revenue status and make or implement the cuts necessary to carry the city through until tax revenues return to an acceptable level.7. Many believe Wellington has trouble promoting itself to outsiders. Do you believe as a tax entity, the city should initiate various promotional programs and if so what would you think they should be?Taylor: I do believe the city should provide monies and promote Wellington promotional programs. As mentioned previously, the city is reaching out to other large corporations throughout the U.S. and sending promotional packets to these companies. Myself and other current council members have been involved in this offering.8. Do you believe in tax incentives to lure in private business? If so or not, please explain.Taylor: I do believe in tax incentives to attract private businesses. I personally believe that we should offer whatever abatements and incentives needed to attract medium to large businesses as I feel in the long term their input into the community will far out weigh the initial cost of bringing them to Wellington.9. The Wellington utility rates continue to be a concern to many citizens, especially the fuel adjustment rates. Do you believe they are reasonable and in line with other communities? Should the city make a change in the way it handles utilities? Taylor: The current utility rates are in line with most Kansas city’s of similar size as Wellington. Wellington is higher that some, lower than others i.e.  Winfield utility rate is higher than Wellingtons. I do not feel that the current rate is unreasonable and I do not feel that changes need to be made at this time. Although, it probably can be anticipated that rates will necessarily go up at some point in the future as it seems every commodity is increasing in cost.  The city council will make every effort to keep rates as reasonable as possible.10. What would you say is Wellington’s biggest concern over the next four years?Taylor:  Wellington’s biggest concern over the next four years, continued loss of citizens, jobs, local businesses, and economic base.  The difficult question before the council and the citizens of Wellington is how do we make the city attractive to outsiders and bring them and their economy to the city. Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 4. The current Wellington City Council is studying ways to supply water to oil companies. What is your position on the matter?Taylor: I have not totally made a decision on the oil companies and water supply issue. During this time of extreme drought I was and currently lean towards not supplying the oil companies with our water as it is a very precious commodity. However; should the rains come and water return to a normal and plentiful level.It appears the individual oil rigs will use between 1.5-2 million gallons of water per project. This is approximately the amount that Wellington uses per day. If the Oil rigs can use non-treated effluent water the we should sell it to them.last_img read more

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Using experimental drugs and vaccines against Ebola is ethical, WHO panel says

first_imgAn ethics panel at the World Health Organization (WHO) has given a green light to treating Ebola patients with experimental drugs for the deadly virus. There had been “unanimous agreement among the experts that in the special circumstances of this Ebola outbreak it is ethical to offer unregistered treatments,” said Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director-general of WHO, at a press conference today in Geneva, Switzerland.“It is important that the committee affirmed the morality of compassionate use,” writes Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University in New York City, in an e-mail. “But there are huge ethical issues that still remain unaddressed and unanswered regarding experimental interventions.” Caplan is not a member of the WHO panel.The 12-member panel had convened by telephone on Monday, as the largest Ebola outbreak on record rages on in West Africa. The virus has already sickened 1848 people and killed 1013 of them in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, according to the latest numbers released by WHO. There are no vaccines or treatments against Ebola on the market. But researchers are developing several drugs, most of them backed by funding from the U.S. government and fueled by worries of bioterrorism.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Since the start of the outbreak, scientists have been discussing whether some of these candidate drugs could be used in West Africa. They were worried, however, that trying out these drugs in Africa would be seen as racist and could increase mistrust toward health care workers, already a problem in battling the outbreak. But after two U.S. health care workers fell ill in Liberia and received ZMapp, an experimental mix of monoclonal antibodies, the discussion took a turn. Some people began arguing that the drug should also be made available in Africa, where the majority of patients are dying.The ethics panel, made up of researchers, ethicists, and patient safety advocates, reached consensus that under certain circumstances in this outbreak, “it is ethical to offer unproven interventions with as yet unknown efficacy and adverse effects, as potential treatment or prevention.“ They also concluded that “there is a moral obligation to collect and share all data generated, including from treatments provided for compassionate use“ and “a moral duty to evaluate these interventions (for treatment or prevention) in the best possible clincial trials under the circumstances.”Conducting clinical trials in the midst of the Ebola outbreak will be “challenging,“ writes Peter Smith, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and one of the members of the ethics panel. But they are the best evidence for efficacy, he believes. “Clear explanations of the purposes of trials to those in the affected communities will be vital as well as obtaining informed consent from patients or their immediate relatives,“ he writes in an e-mail.Many questions are still unanswered, Caplan says. For instance: who should weigh risks and benefits of a given therapy. “That cannot and should not be left to potential subjects,“ he writes. Other questions include who will pay for the unapproved drugs, who can give consent for using them, and how companies will be protected from liabilites should the drugs have harmful side effects.Even more difficult is the question of how the limited amount of experimental drugs available should be distributed. According to several news stories, the last supplies of ZMapp have been sent to Liberia to treat two doctors there, and it will take months to produce more of the drug. Other experimental drugs are also available only in small quantities. When they are used, should health care workers be treated first, as some scientists have suggested? How should the supplies be distributed among countries?“Much more ethical work needs to be done to create a sound infrastructure for compassionate use in humanitarian emergencies,“ Caplan writes. The ethics panel will meet in Geneva at the end of the month, Kieny said. Then, they will have to tackle at least some of these thorny questions.*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more