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moe. Paid Tribute To Butch Trucks With An Awesome “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed” Encore At The Georgia Theatre [Recap / Setlist]

first_imgJam stalwarts moe. continued their winter tour last night with a tight two-set performance at the Georgia Theatre in Athens, GA. The band filled the show with older, fan favorite material, awesome and poignant covers, ambitious improvisation and slick transitions.Set one opened with an energetic take on “Sensory Deprivation Bank”. “All Roads Lead to Home” followed, before a fun version of “Queen of Everything” was trotted out. “Don’t Wanna Be” came next, before an awesome “Opium” into “New York City” segment that was the highlight of the first set. A big “McBain” brought the first set to a close.Set two started off with the familiar falsetto of “Blue Jeans Pizza”. A heartfelt “The Happiest Days Of Our Lives” was up next, and that started off an awesome three-song segment that featured Pink Floyd‘s ever-poignant “Another Brick in the Wall”, and a raucous “Lazarus”. The band then kicked into high-gear with a seamless, four-song set-closing run through “Hi and Lo”, “Don’t Fuck With Flo”, “Ricky Marten”, and “Meat”.For the encore, the band stepped on the stage and busted out an improv-heavy cover of the Allman Brothers‘ classic “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed”. It was a touching tribute to the recently deceased Butch Trucks, who sadly passed away earlier this week. They turned in an emotional version of “Liz Reed” in honor of their fallen compadre, as they toured with the Allman’s back in the 2000s.See below for a full setlist from last night’s moe. show at the Georgia Theatre. Catch moe. at their next tour stop at the Bijou Theatre in Knoxville, TN on Tuesday, January 31st.moe. | Georgia Theatre | Athens, GA | 1/28/2017Set One: Sensory Deprivation Bank, All Roads Lead to Home, Queen of Everything, Don’t Wanna Be, Opium> New York City, McBainSet Two: Blue Jeans Pizza, The Happiest Days Of Our Lives > Another Brick in the Wall> Lazarus, Hi and Lo> Don’t Fuck With Flo> Ricky Marten> MeatEncore: In Memory Of Elizabeth Reedlast_img read more

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WHO warns ‘long way to go’ in virus crisis, deaths top 180,000

first_img‘Significant step’ But Germany, which has cautiously begun allowing shops to reopen, offered another glimmer of hope when it announced that human trials for a vaccine will start by next week.The trial, only the fifth to have been authorized worldwide, is a “significant step” in making a vaccine “available as soon as possible”, the country’s regulatory body said.With several months to go before a viable vaccine can be rolled out, more than half of humanity remains under some form of lockdown.Singapore extended its confinement order for a month to June 1, as the Asian city-state — which managed to keep its outbreak in check early on — has been hit by second-wave infections.The director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also warned Americans to prepare for a more challenging second round of outbreaks, should it be mixed with seasonal flu infections.”There’s a possibility that the assault of the virus on our nation next winter will actually be even more difficult than the one we just went through,” Robert Redfield told The Washington Post.On Wednesday, Redfield urged Americans to “embrace the flu vaccine with confidence, as mitigating its effects would help the overall health battle.In South Africa, more than 73,000 extra troops were sent out to enforce a shutdown as authorities struggled to keep people indoors — particularly in overcrowded townships. With businesses shuttered and millions of jobs lost, the UN’s World Food Program (WFP) said the virus crisis would hit the least privileged the hardest.It said the number of people suffering from acute hunger was projected to nearly double to 265 million this year.Standing in line in Bangkok’s historic quarter for food donations of rice, noodles, milk and curry packets, Chare Kunwong, a 46-year-old masseur, said: “If I wait for the government’s aid, then I’ll be dead first.” Health experts in the world’s biggest economy warned it could face a complicated second coronavirus wave if it dovetails with the seasonal flu this winter, as some US states moved to reopen select businesses.Nations around the world have been scrambling to fight the pandemic — which has killed more than 180,000 people and infected nearly 2.6 million worldwide — while desperately seeking ways to limit the devastating economic fallout.As some countries have moved to lift lockdown restrictions that have upended daily life around the globe, WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus issued a sober warning. “Make no mistake: we have a long way to go. This virus will be with us for a long time,” Tedros told a virtual press conference. Topics : The World Health Organization on Wednesday warned that the coronavirus crisis will not end any time soon, with many countries only in the early stages of the fight, as the global death toll surpassed 180,000.The pandemic has sparked not only a health emergency, but a global economic rout, with businesses struggling to survive, millions left jobless, and millions more facing starvation.US President Donald Trump — with an eye on widespread unemployment and his re-election prospects in November — signed an executive order suspending the issuance of green cards for 60 days. ‘Wrong and unjust’ In the United States, Trump said Wednesday his order to suspend the issuance of green cards would “ensure that unemployed Americans of all backgrounds will be first in line for jobs as our economy reopens.”The US recorded a further 1,738 deaths on Wednesday — fewer than the day before, but bringing its total number of fatalities since the outbreak began there to 46,583, by far the most of any country.It has also reported nearly 840,000 infections, and health care infrastructure, especially in hotspots like New York, has struggled to cope.”We must guard against a dangerous rebound” of the coronavirus “after all this death”, Trump told reporters.Protesters took to the streets again Wednesday — this time in Virginia’s state capital Richmond — to demand that stay-at-home orders be lifted so people can get back to work.But that demonstration came as experts revealed that the country’s first virus-related death came in February, weeks earlier than first reported. ‘Now they die alone’ Among those hardest hit economically during the crisis are millions of migrant workers who toil abroad to send money back home to their families.Remittances are expected to plunge by about 20 percent globally this year, the biggest decline in recent history, the World Bank said in a report on the money transfers that are lifelines to millions of families.The pandemic shutdowns mean even the bodies of some migrant workers cannot be sent home, and are instead being buried or cremated in the country where they die — often without any loved ones present.”Nobody comes anymore, nobody touches, nobody says goodbye,” said Ishwar Kumar, manager of a Hindu cremation ground in Dubai.Before the pandemic, people would come “to grieve and bring flowers. Now they die alone”. “Most countries are still in the early stages of their epidemics. And some that were affected early in the pandemic are now starting to see a resurgence in cases.”Worst-hit region Europe saw its death toll climb to another grim milestone of 110,000, while fatalities in Italy, the hardest hit country behind the United States, topped 25,000.Finland said it would maintain a ban on gatherings of more than 500 people through July.In Spain, which reported a slight increase for the second day running in the number of COVID-19 deaths, the government said it did not expect to lift its strict lockdown until mid-May.”We must be incredibly careful in this phase,” Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said.last_img read more

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STRANGE: Euthanasia debate linked to ‘putting animal down’

first_imgEuthanasia: How is it done, and what’s it like putting down something you’ve vowed to care for?Stuff co.nz 5 April 2017Family First Comment: Supporters of euthanasia compare euthanasia to putting animals down (which the SPCA probably does every day, including mongrel or aggressive dogs), but… “Questions over whether pets would need to be euthanased as frequently if quality palliative care existed, were incomparable to a subsidised public health system, she said.”Exactly. Comparing apples with oranges. #rejectassistedsuicideIt’s not uncommon for a distraught a pet owner, standing by Rover as he’s put down in a veterinary clinic, to lament “I wish we could have done this to Grandma,” MPs investigating euthanasia have been told.Parliament’s Health Select Committee is nearing the end of its inquiry into euthanasia, and its MPs requested for specific evidence to be given on the mechanics of the process by leading veterinarians and an anaesthetist.While they had sat through months of public submission hearings on the moral, legal and ethical points around euthanasia, little evidence had been given on the process itself and what it felt like for the clinician performing it.Dean of Massey University’s Veterinary School Jenny Weston said it was difficult to draw too many parallels between animals and humans, but few vets would prefer to prolong suffering rather than put an animal down.As a profession, we don’t have a compulsory requirement for a debrief as there are in other professions – where you can go and unburden your soul about what might be troubling you.“I think there would be almost no veterinarians, who when there is a sick animal that’s in pain, and there is no treatment available, would have any concerns about it,” she said.READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/91236530/euthanasia-how-is-it-done-and-whats-it-like-putting-down-something-youve-vowed-to-care-forKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more