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ThirdSector interview with Howard Lake

ThirdSector interview with Howard Lake Aware of the limited life of some Internet fundraising models, Howard “warned charities to be aware of the fast pace of change in Internet technology.” Addressing the trialing of Asymmetric Digital Subscription Lines (ADSL), “he claimed the introduction of faster lines could have significant implications on the pricing structures which could undermine existing ISPs.” The current issue of ThirdSector magazine carries an interview with UK Fundraising’s Howard Lake. Henry Palmer’s article “Net profits for charities” looks at the launch of free Internet Service Providers by charities as a fundraising tool.< Howard Lake | 19 May 1999 | News  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The current issue of ThirdSector magazine carries an interview with UK Fundraising’s Howard Lake. Henry Palmer’s article “Net profits for charities” looks at the launch of free Internet Service Providers by charities as a fundraising tool. Howard is quoted as saying “becoming an ISP could have exciting fundraising potential for charities”. He adds: “a charity ISP should be regarded in the same way as an affinity fundraising scheme.” Read UK Fundraising’s list of free charity ISPs as examples of online fundraising. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world's first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

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Use of arrest and torture in bid to stifle protests in Bahrain

first_img Help by sharing this information August 13, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Use of arrest and torture in bid to stifle protests in Bahrain German spyware company FinFisher searched by public prosecutors News to go further BahrainMiddle East – North Africa Since the arrests of Hassan and Hubail, others have been arrested on the same charges – participating in the 14 February media network and inciting hatred against the government.Qassim Zain Aldeen, a freelance cameraman who posts content on several local news portals, has been held at an unknown located ever since his arrest at his home on 2 August and his family has not been told what he is charged with. He was previously held for six months in 2012.Ahmed Al-Fardan, a photographer for the Demotix and Sipa agencies who won the Freedom House photography prize in 2012, was arrested in a west Manama café on 8 August by plainclothes police who beat him and threatened to kill him if he did not cooperate and provide photos of demonstrators. He was released a few hours later with several injuries.Security agents arrested Hassan’s lawyer, Abdul Aziz Mousa, at this home on 7 August and seized his computer because he posted the names of the defendants on his Twitter account, along with the charges against them and the acts of torture to which they had been submitted.The prosecutor-general said Mousa has been charged with “publishing the names of defendants without permission and divulging the secrets of an investigation.”A reporter and a human rights defender have meanwhile been prevented from entering Bahrain. Hyder Abbasi of Al-Jazeera English was prevented from boarding a flight from Doha to Bahrain on 7 August because he is a journalist. Two days later, the British authorities told Maryam Al-Khawaja, the acting president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, that the Bahraini authorities had forbidden her from visiting the country.The heightened crackdown on Bahraini Internet users and activists comes just days after the National Assembly recommended tougher penalties for “those who use social networks in an illegal way (and…) use those networks to disseminate false information to foreign sides which plot against the country’s security and stability.” RSF_en News Follow the news on Bahrain Receive email alerts Tenth anniversary of Bahraini blogger’s arrest News BahrainMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders is concerned by a new upsurge in abusive treatment of journalists in the run-up to the major “Tamarod” rally that the opposition has called for 14 August.Journalists who intend to cover the demonstration – and thereby challenge the government’s insistence that everything is perfect in Bahrain – are exposed to arrest and mistreatment. There is still no news of a cameraman who was arrested on 2 August.“The authorities plan to impose a news blackout on the 14 August demonstration by jailing netizens and preventing journalists and human rights defenders from visiting Bahrain.” Reporters Without Borders said.“They have had no hesitation about arbitrarily arresting news providers and denying them access to lawyers while failing to bring formal charges against them. We call for their immediate and unconditional release.”At least two bloggers, two photographers and a cameraman have been arrested in Bahrain since the end of July. The police arrested them to prevent them from covering the 14 August rally, several sources told Reporters Without Borders.Masked security agents arrested the blogger Mohamed Hassan at his home at 2 a.m. on 31 July, seizing his computer and mobile phone. The photographer Hussain Hubail was arrested the same day as he was about to leave Manama international airport.Both were taken to El-Hod El-Gaf prison without being charged, and were held for several days without being able to contact lawyers or their families. It was only on 7 August that there were able to talk to a lawyer and were brought before prosecutors.They have been charged being members of the “14 February media network,” calling for and participating in illegal demonstrations, inciting hatred against the government and being in contact with exiled members of the Bahraini opposition.Hassan has said he was tortured in detention. He said that he was beaten on the back, lower abdomen and hands, was given electric shocks, and was forced to sign documents without knowing their content. Hubail was forced to remain standing for three days while being punched, kicked and insulted.This is not the first time that Hassan – who has kept a blog on human rights and politics in Bahrain since 2007 – has been persecuted in connection with his journalistic work. He was briefly arrested in June 2012 because of what he was writing about the opposition in his blog and for local newspapers. He stopped blogging on 29 April.Hubail is a freelance photographer who has worked for Agence France-Presse, Voice of America and other media. The independent newspaper Al-Wasat awarded him its prize in May for a photo of demonstrators in a cloud of teargas. News March 17, 2021 Find out more October 14, 2020 Find out more Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives Organisation June 15, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Anti-government protesters target media, attack German reporter

first_img ThailandAsia – Pacific November 27, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Anti-government protesters target media, attack German reporter Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar to go further Covid-19 emergency laws spell disaster for press freedom Reporters Without Borders condemns the harassment of journalists by street demonstrators amid growing criticism of state television’s lack of coverage, or biased coverage, of a month-old wave of anti-government protests. The criticism has focused on state-owned Channels 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 in particular.“The lack of impartial state TV coverage of pro- and anti-government demonstrations is clearly a major problem but this does not give demonstrators grounds for focusing their frustration with the government on the media and it certainly does not justify the physical attack that a German freelance journalist received,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is unacceptable that journalists should be physically targeted for their supposed ‘pro-government’ reporting. This kind of attack on a reporter who had an armband clearly identifying him as a journalist casts serious doubt on the protest movement’s legitimacy.”The Thai Broadcast Journalists Association and the Thai Journalists Association issued a joint statement that stressed the important of impartial reporting but rejected the accusations of biased coverage. They also urged protest organizers to ensure that the demonstrations continued to be peaceful and that no marches on TV stations took place.The demonstrations in Bangkok degenerated on 24 November when protesters surrounded vehicles owned by Channel 3 and Channel 7.A crowd targeted German freelance journalist Nick Nostitz yesterday after one of the protest leaders, Jumpol Chumsai, identified him as a pro-government “red shirt” and urged the crowd to “chase” him away from the demonstration. Nostitz was slightly hurt but managed to escape with help from the police.The attack was quickly condemned by the Foreign Correspondents’ Club, which called on protest leaders to publicly recognize that the rights of all national and foreign journalists should be respected.Thailand is ranked 135th out of 179 countries in the 2013 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Organisation News Help by sharing this information News Newscenter_img Red alert for green journalism – 10 environmental reporters killed in five years Receive email alerts News May 12, 2021 Find out more RSF_en ThailandAsia – Pacific Follow the news on Thailand August 21, 2020 Find out more June 12, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Do We Lack A ‘Culture Of Rule Of Law’ ?

first_imgColumnsDo We Lack A ‘Culture Of Rule Of Law’ ? Anandh Venkataramani1 July 2020 5:45 AMShare This – xWe need to re-inform our human tendencies that adherence to laws is for the greater self and societal interestMahatma Gandhi is reported to have said “[A] nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people”. India has many deep and rooted cultures (some good, some bad), often evoking pride. There is one culture, however, that appears to be in short supply: the culture of rule of law. This thought first occurred when I was witnessing a panel debate a couple of years ago…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginMahatma Gandhi is reported to have said “[A] nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people”. India has many deep and rooted cultures (some good, some bad), often evoking pride. There is one culture, however, that appears to be in short supply: the culture of rule of law. This thought first occurred when I was witnessing a panel debate a couple of years ago on whether India is a rule of law state. Arguing for the motion, a Member of Parliament and an advocate relied largely on the existence of the Constitution of India, 1950 – with its myriad checks and balances on governmental action; recognition and protection of civil liberties and fundamental rights. They also argued, with noticeably lesser conviction, that instances of failures of rule of law were mere aberrations (asserted in response to arguments on large-scale violation of fundamental rights, or failures to uphold them). Are they?Failure of adherence to rule of law – an aberration or the normal? Aberration is defined in various dictionaries as a departure from the normal and what is expected – temporary changes from the normal, i.e., something that is not typical. A quick exercise to test whether we are a rule of law people and whether the following of rules is normalcy, is to look at our conduct in public spaces. Are acts of skipping or jumping queues; ignoring traffic lights; going on the wrong side of the road, or riding motorcycles on footpaths rare and abnormal? Does littering on roads and public spaces shock our conscience? Let us test this qua authorities and those identified with state and government. If one was to do a word association with ‘politics’, ‘politician’, would the words ‘honest’, ‘transparent’, or ‘dedicated’ ever be used (despite some, who surely fit the description)? Does the thought of a policeman inspire security or evoke fear of arbitrariness among those without power or privilege? Even if one is to wrongly brush these aside as de minimis, the recent past has seen too many incidents of a failure of adherence to rule of law for it to be considered an aberration. The riots that erupted in December and January during the Anti-CAA protests; the open use of firearms by civilians on each other, and the unfortunate incidences of police complacency (to put it mildly) demonstrated the willingness of entire sections of our population to take law into their own hands. What made matters worse was political figures were seen to encourage the lawlessness, with little or no accountability (as the recent Delhi Police Chargesheet(s) have demonstrated). Closer to the current crisis, we saw many people congregate in large numbers, in complete ignorance of social distancing norms, whether in “Go Corona, Go” rallies; religious gatherings, or weddings. Political and executive leadership were also seen involved. Humans, like every other animal, are creatures of habit and convenience. Instinctively, self-interest Trumps all. But living in a society, we subscribe to a set of laws with the understanding that these laws are for universal benefit – for an orderly and secure life. We accept these rules despite intrusions into what would otherwise be our absolute rights or liberties. A 2004 Report of the United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Anan, in the Security Council, defined rule of law as “a principle of governance in which all persons, institutions and entities, public and private, including the State itself, are accountable to laws that are publicly promulgated, equally enforced and independently adjudicated, and which are consistent with international human rights norms and standards.” It mandates:(a) supremacy of law, (b) equality before the law, (c) accountability to the law, (d) fairness in the application of the law, (e) separation of powers, and(f) participation in decision-making.Culture of rule of law in India The MP and the advocate (who were in the panel discussion mentioned above) were right in arguing that structurally the Constitution and the various laws of India impose legal restraints on government from acting arbitrarily, and provide for maintenance of order and they coordinate behaviour and transactions amongst citizens. There is adjudication and judicial review of transgressions of the Constitution and other laws. Most importantly, these systems have robust frameworks that incorporate fairness, transparency, and accountability. This is supported by the fact that in the Global Rule of law Index (carried out by the World Justice Project) finds India ranked between 20-50 (out of 128 countries) on factors such as constraint on government powers by legislature and judiciary; open government; due process in administrative procedure; and civil and criminal justice systems free of improper governmental influence. So, structurally or at least facially, we are a rule of law state. But why, then, are ‘aberrations’ as normal as the normal? Why is it that India had abysmal rankings of 111 of 128 in a discrimination-free civil justice system; 89 in impartiality in the criminal system; 84 in respect of fundamental rights; 105 in terms of equal treatment and absence of discrimination; ranked 99 for government officials in police and military not using public office for private gain? If you’ve lived in northern India, you’d have surely heard the refrain “Tu jaanta hai mera baap kaun hai?”, necessarily implying that chip and the old block are either beyond the reach of any arm of law, long or short, or that they can manipulate its application. It is not surprising, then, that India ranks at 113 for people not resorting to violence to redress personal grievances. Notably, we are outranked either by Nepal or Sri Lanka or both, in most of these factors. The usual ‘developing nation’ or ‘population’ excuses, won’t fly. What have they got that we don’t? Whilst I can’t speak for our neighbours, I believe that generally, Indians lack an overarching culture of rule of law (and I was naïve enough to believe that I had a novel thought in arriving at this conclusion). Brian Tamanaha, a renowned American academic, in ‘A Concise Guide to Rule of Law’ (which ought to be a basic civics reading), says that that for rule of law to exist, people must believe in and be committed to the rule of law. They must take it for granted as a necessary, proper, and existing part of their political-legal system. This attitude is not itself a legal rule. It is a shared political ideal that amounts to a cultural belief. When this cultural belief is pervasive, the rule of law can be resilient, spanning generations, surviving episodes in which the rule of law is flouted by government officials. Therefore, it becomes clear that a system of laws can effectively contribute to a strengthened rule of law only when most members of society believe in, respect, and generally abide by the agreed-on laws. This is the culture of rule of law. Tamanaha also notes that in virtually all social arenas, social norms largely shape and govern daily existence; legal norms may be largely irrelevant to the bulk of routine social conduct – again pointing towards the significance of a pervasive culture of respect for laws. This is intuitive. Many countries that rank significantly above India in the Rule of Law Index are those which have risen from utter ruin – economic, infrastructural, and social – caused by World War II. Such societal and economic growth would not be possible without an abiding cultural inclination towards law. Northern European countries are a prime example. Kiyotaka Akasaka, a former Undersecretary to the United Nations, has said that the Japanese have an ingrained respect for and are generally taught to obey laws, even if they don’t agree with them, which has allowed them have to rebound quickly after any disaster as also have greater enforcement of laws. This, he says, translates to people waiting for the right of way at traffic lights even if no vehicles are approaching from other sides. This, in fact, would be an aberration in India.Adherence of rule of law necessary for progress Basic criminal laws; laws governing probity (i.e., lack of corruption) in governance; basic civic rules and laws (in the current context – laws requiring social distancing etc.), and laws protecting certain inviolable fundamental rights are laws that nobody should derogate from, because they are at the foundations of societal cohesion. Having said this, one has to address the important question of content-independent adherence of laws – i.e., obedience because it is law, and not because of what the law states. Akasaka deals with this issue in line with legal theory (and practice) accepted in all societies where civic participation in governance is essential – changing ‘bad’ or ‘disliked’ laws through parliament. Whilst the legislative cogs can be slow, social outcries, protests, civil disobedience etc. have often sped up the parliamentarian’s hand. If (for all his flaws) Gandhi hadn’t led the satyagraha movements; if women across the world didn’t march for suffrage; if Rosa Parks didn’t refuse to move from her seat and Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t have a dream; if Sunderlal Bahuguna and his wife didn’t inspire the Chipko Movement; if Medha Patkar and many others in the Naramda Bachao Andholan hadn’t unrelentingly and tirelessly lent their voices to the destitute and displaced farmers, many social and political rights that are taken granted would still have been on the battlegrounds. Sadly, many still are. John F. Kennedy’s warning – “[t]hose who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable” – is not out of place here. But at the root of each of these movements, is the belief that laws – just and fair – should govern, and that everyone should be equal before, and be equally bound by just and fair laws. The benefit of global hindsight has shown us that where public officials are seen as corrupt and self-serving; or where law has a history of authoritarian flavours; or where the content of laws are perceived to be unfair or unduly favour some social or economic sections, there is distrust in the government, and fear of the state. This problem is aggravated when the society is diverse (ethnically, economically, socially etc.), and where a common set of social values and belief systems do not exist, and finding or conjuring a set of agreed on laws is hard. Arguably, some of these problems are prevalent in India. In Leanne Mackay’s “Towards a Rule of Law” published under the aegis of the United States Institute of Peace, it is noted that a rights-respecting, rule of law abiding government does not materialise on its own. It requires the active engagement of all members of society to uphold these principles and to assist the government in creating a social and institutional rule of law culture. Tamanaha usefully observes that for this cultural belief to be viable, people must identify with the law and perceive it as worthy of ruling. General trust in law must be earned, and it takes time to become what is tantamount to a cultural view about ‘law’ passed on through socialisation. This socialisation will be no easy task especially when those in power – whether political, or in public offices, or in law enforcement – set examples that one can get away with disobeying law and disrespecting the basic values of the Constitution. This will not be easy when institutions that are required to impartially apply and uphold the law, tacitly or directly approve transgressions despite their conscience and their sworn duty to do otherwise. And finally, this will not be easy unless those who inform our personal and social conscience and value systems as they form – i.e., parents – are the best versions of themselves and set the right examples for their children. This piece is intended to impress upon the reader the critical importance of having a widespread culture of rule of law. For only through such a pervasive culture, can we witness true progress, unhindered by those who would flout the law. This is neither meant to be an academic work nor is it meant to be an ode of despair, but rather, a call for action. Justice M.N. Venkatachaliah, one of the most respected Jurist-Chief Justices in the recent past, whilst quoting another great jurist-judge from the United States, had this to say in his essay “Constitutional Ideals and Justice in Plural Societies”: “‘Values’, said Learned Hand, ‘are ultimate; they admit of no reduction below themselves’. So too are certain irreducible constitutional values which underpin the survival and success of constitutional order and a concordial society. What are these values? What are the tools for effectuating them? The basic values of the Constitution are reflected in the Preamble, the fundamental rights and the directive principles which along with the charter of fundamental duties may be said to constitute the conscience of the Constitution. … The emotive words “Justice, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity” open up a vast music of hope. They are words of passion and power and may be said to be the spiritual pillars of the Constitution. …” Duty to inculcate constitutional values in our livesWe have, in the form of Part IVA (Article 51A) of the highest law of our land – the Constitution – a sombre and inspirational reminder of the Fundamental Duties of each citizen. It is useful to remember that the word duties in Part IVA is prefixed with the same word that is prefixed to the word ‘rights’ in Part III, i.e., “Fundamental” (as also noted by the Supreme Court of India in AIIMS Students’ Union v. AIIMS & Ors., (2002) 1 SCC 428 (at para 58)). Some of these fundamental duties include : (a) abide by principles and ideals of our constitution; (e) promote harmony and the spirit of common brotherhood amongst all the people of India transcending religious, linguistic and regional or sectional diversities; to renounce practices derogatory to the dignity of women; (g) protect and improve the natural environment including forests, lakes, rivers and wild life, and to have compassion for living creatures; (h) develop the scientific temper, humanism and the spirit of inquiry and reform; (i) safeguard public property and to abjure violence, and (j) strive towards excellence in all spheres of individual and collective activity. It is time we remind ourselves or these fundamental duties, repeatedly, till it becomes part of who we are. We have no other option than to actively inculcate in our individual and collective psyche that constitutional values and laws of the land should be followed because it is the right thing to do, whether it is in our individual lives, or it is in the public sphere of legislative and executive action. We need to re-inform our human tendencies that adherence to laws is for the greater self and societal interest – that everyone benefits when you follow the laws, and that you benefit when everyone follows the laws. I refuse to believe that the heart and soul of India is incapable of a culture of harmony and rule of law. I started with Gandhi, and will end with the full quote that is (wrongly or rightly) paraphrased as “[B]e the change you want to see in this world”: “We but mirror the world. All the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body. If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. This is the divine mystery supreme. A wonderful thing it is and the source of our happiness. We need not wait to see what others do.” (The author is an Advocate practicing in Courts in Delhi and can be e-mailed at [email protected]) Next Storylast_img read more

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Hearts share spoils with Aduana at home

first_imgHearts of Oak’s poor run in the 2012 Glo Premier League continued with a listless 1-1 drawn game against Aduana Stars at the Accra Sports Stadium.The game was not without incident as Hearts fans cursed at referee Ernest Baafi who they accused of biased officiating, especially in the second half and registered their displeasure by pelting him with sachet water and other foreign materials.It was Aduana’s Samuel Asiedu who put the visitors ahead in 4th minute of the game in what could be described as an early scare for the Phobians.But Hearts’ Romeo Abban rallied back to level things up ten minutes later for the Phobians.The visitors were dominant in the first half and could have wrapped things up but lacked ideas in front of goal.Back from recess, Hearts skipper Mahathma Otoo will rue the many missed chances that came his way and some of them were criminal. Ashitey Ollenu in one of his many rampaging runs on the right, set Otoo up with an immaculate cross but right in the six yard box, Mahatma fired way above the goal post much to the chagrin of the supporters.Goal Keeper Tetteh Lugard kept the Phobians in the game after he pulled some excellent saves from the many set pieces that came the way of the visitors.The Hearts keeper again parried an excellent goal bound volley but charged on referee Baafi for a foul he accused the referee of not giving.He was yellow carded for his troubles and that sent the Hearts fans angry.From the stands they cursed and chanted at the referee whilst a few threw materials on the pitch. The police together with some of the Hearts players pleaded for patience. Aduana appeared content with the results and resorted to playing a delay tactic which worked to perfection.One all it ended at the Accra Sports Stadium, a result which put the Phobians 14th on the league table and the visitors second on the league log.Results of Match 12 DayHearts 1-1 Aduana StarsTema Youth 0–1 Heart of LionsDwarfs 0–2 AmidausAll Stars 1–0 LibertyChelsea 2-0 KotokoMedeama SC 3–0 ArsenalsEdubiase 1-1 AshgoldKing Faisal 1-0 RTUlast_img read more

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Honor 8C is coming to India on November 29 with a Snapdragon 632 chipset

first_imgHonor is ready to announce its next smartphone in India after the Honor 8X. The company will be bringing the Honor 8C which is expected to be priced lower than the 8X. The Honor 8C will succeed the Honor 7C, but more notably it will be the world’s first phone to sport a Snapdragon 632 chipset. This is a mid-range processor that slots just below the Snapdragon 636 SoC that powers the likes of the Redmi Note 6 Pro and Nokia 6.1 Plus.The Honor 8C will be an Amazon-exclusive product and there is a dedicated page on the e-commerce website that reveals some key specs about the device. The Honor 8C was first announced in China last month priced at CNY 1,099 (approx Rs 11,800) for the base model wih 4GB of RAM and 32GB of inbuilt storage and CNY 1,399 (approx Rs 15,000) for the 4GB + 64GB configuration. We expect the Honor 8C’s price in India to be similar at under Rs 15,000.The Honor 8C comes with a notch display so you can expect more screen-to-body ratio. It sports a 6.26-inch HD+ (1520X720) display and a 19:9 aspect ratio. As mentioned earlier, it is powered by an octa-core Snapdragon 632 chipset. This is an octa-core processor that clocks at 1.8GHz and gets an Adreno 506 GPU. This chipset pairs with 4GB of RAM. Honor my announce both 32GB and 64GB storage variants in India.The upcoming Honor smartphone also sports an AI-based dual camera system with 13MP + 2MP configuration. The primary sensor gets an f/1.8 aperture while the secondary sensor will be used for portrait shots. On the front, the Honor 8C sports an 8MP sensor with f/2.0 aperture. The handset houses a 4,000mAh battery that promises to deliver up to two days of battery life.advertisementlast_img read more