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Journalist Ali-Reza Jabari released after more than 18 months in prison

first_img October 18, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist Ali-Reza Jabari released after more than 18 months in prison Reporters Without Borders welcomed the release on 14 October 2004 of Ali-Reza Jabari, contributor to several newspapers, after more than 18 months in prison.The worldwide press freedom organisation said that international pressure and a campaign by Chilean author Isabel Allende were responsible for the decision to free Jabari who, despite being more than 60 years old and suffering heart trouble, received 174 lashes in detention.Isabel Allende had lobbied the highest authorities in the Islamic Republic of Iran to secure the ailing journalist’s early release, said Reporters Without Borders.Jabari was sentenced on 19 April 2003 to four years in prison, 253 lashes and a fine of six million Rials (about 1,000 euros) for “drinking and distributing alcoholic drinks, adultery and incitement to immoral acts”, a charge regularly used against secular figures. Jabari is an outspoken commentator who writes for the monthly Adineh and a member of the Iranian Writers Association June 9, 2021 Find out more Organisation RSF_en IranMiddle East – North Africa March 18, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Iran Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img June 11, 2021 Find out more News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to election News News IranMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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Nurses getting parking fines at Altnagelvin Hospital

first_img Pinterest Google+ Previous articleDonegal people without broadband are disadvantaged, Dail hearsNext articleOne of two new Covid-19 test centres at Dublin Airport opens today News Highland Twitter Pinterest Nurses getting parking fines at Altnagelvin Hospital A Derry City and Strabane District Councillor says Health Trusts must put in place a system to ensure that nurses are not penalised for parking in the hospitals where they work.Cllr Jason Barr says he’s been told that on a number of occasions, nurses have come out from shifts at Altnagelvin Hospital to find parking fine notices on their windscreens.He says some nurses have received fines on four occasions over the past six weeks.Cllr Barr says this must be addressed immediately at the highest level:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/jasonb1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By News Highland – November 19, 2020 WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+center_img AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

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Let’s add value to leadership skills

first_img Comments are closed. Let’s add value to leadership skillsOn 9 May 2000 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Business success is reliant on leaders gaining a philosophical edge tofoster good staff relations, argues Jo ParkerWith the “balance of power” set to swing back towards employees, courtesy ofEurope and the Labour Government, employers need managers in place who can meetthe new workplace relations, without taking a defensive stance and ensuringthey are of benefit to the business as well as employees.Many employees have had to adapt to the flexible labour market and behave asif they are “in business for themselves”, acquiring the relevantacumen and confidence as their skills portfolios have grown. Unions too arechanging their profile in preparation for working in “partnership”with employers and are intent on becoming more business-focused in theirapproach to employee relations.At the same time, managers seem to have fallen behind in personaldevelopment. As one HR consultant puts it, “They start off well but soonfind themselves locked into stressful, hierarchical ladder climbing whichcompromises their integrity.” Any initial enthusiasm for the job is soon replaced by an unbalanced focuson self-interest which ensures the short-term mind set of senior managementhears what it wants to hear. Meanwhile, beneath middle management level,respect from increasingly sophisticated subordinates may be negligible; labourturnover and recruitment costs high – with employees staying only long enoughto make it worth their while; and workplace relations poor with a growingdivision between managers and those they aim to manage. For employers with long-term vision, this isolating division is ultimatelydamaging to the business. But who is to blame? Is it possible for middlemanagers to demonstrate anything other than a survival instinct to”process manage” when they have to work under such conflictingexpectations from above and below? The Roffey Park Management agenda, Learning Through Shared Experience,published earlier this year, showed that managers have become increasinglycynical as they realise espoused organisational values do not match the valuesdictated from superiors. Dismissive management styles easily become the norm for junior managers tomimic, causing workplace relations to suffer with the consequential loss ofcompetitive advantage.The solution is simple but hard to accept because it does not involve theimplementation of yet another involvement scheme. It is managers themselves –not employees – who need to work differently. For the majority of employers whoat least appreciate the equation of business success in relation to involvingand treating employees as a valued resource, it is time to pay more than lipservice to “paper values”.Managers who are capable of contributing to the organisation’s growth needto be developed with the right type of “philosophical” leadershipskills which give them the confidence to be themselves and work”with” rather than “react to” subordinates and superiors. With the emerging HR interest in “spirituality at work”, thehistorical development of societal behaviour facilitated by the employmentcontract is being questioned. Individuals in a position to make a difference must start to realise that theacquirement of managerial status at work does not give them rights to indulgein bullying behaviour and encourage inequality. They have instead theresponsibility to create a collaborative, productive working environment whichenables staff to retain their dignity and contribute positively. Senior managers also need to be seen to actively encourage this behaviour,rather than merely signing a piece of paper to endorse their approval. Ifmanagers cannot keep up with the changes that employees and unions areundergoing, new-style unions could well evolve to fill the gaps, and the skillsnecessary to maintain success will become increasingly hard to come by. Unless corporate values genuinely allow middle managers to demonstrate thepersonal credibility necessary to foster good working relations, they willcontinue to become self-sufficient only at surviving in the organisationalmelee at the expense of long-term corporate success. Jo Parker is an employment law consultant at Pharos Learning Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Kalmar, Yara Team Up on World’s 1st Fully-Digitalized Cargo Solution for Yara Birkeland

first_imgKalmar and Yara have entered into an agreement in which Kalmar will deliver fully autonomous equipment, software and services for a fully digitalized container handling solution at Yara’s Porsgrunn facility in Norway.This means that all the necessary operations related to the world’s first autonomous and electric container vessel Yara Birkeland will be conducted in a fully autonomous and cost-efficient manner, with zero emissions, as explained by the two companies.The delivery is scheduled to be completed during the second quarter of 2020.“With this agreement, Yara Birkeland is not just the world’s first electric and autonomous container vessel; it is the world’s first fully digitalised and electric supply chain, with all operations, including loading, unloading and sailing conducted in a fully autonomous manner with zero emissions,” Tove Andersen, EVP Production, Yara, commented.Norwegian fertilizer producer Yara last year announced a partnership with technology company Kongsberg to build the world’s first fully autonomous, battery operated container vessel.Yara Birkeland is expected to reduce emissions and improve road safety by removing up to 40,000 truck journeys annually in a densely populated area of Norway. The vessel will transport fertilizer from Yara’s Porsgrunn plant via inland waterways to the deep-sea ports of Larvik and Brevik, a journey of 31 nautical miles.Kalmar, part of Cargotec, will provide the autonomous loading and unloading solution for Yara Birkeland, as well as transportation between the fertilizer production facilities and the quay. The solution will be implemented in phases, with the level of automation gradually increased over time. The end result will be a fully autonomous, mixed-traffic and zero-emission solution in an industrial environment, according to the duo.Kalmar will also support Yara’s operations with a full-scale service contract. Furthermore, Kalmar personnel will provide operational, automation and software support for the whole solution.“We are very excited to work with Yara on this unique groundbreaking project. The project involves several firsts for us, including the first fully automated RMG for vessel loading, unloading and container storage management. Furthermore, the Kalmar FastCharge AutoStrads will drive along the public roads in the Porsgrunn industrial park, which is also used by normal road traffic. We are working closely with local authorities and other parties to ensure the safety of passengers and vehicles at all times,” Tero Kokko, Senior Vice President, Automation and Projects, Kalmar, said.Image Courtesy: Yara/Kalmarlast_img read more

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Women’s World Cup 2019: Megan Rapinoe embracing her veteran status

first_imgJump ahead 13 years. She’ll be 34 in July and one of the oldest on the USWNT roster for the World Cup. Over the course of more than a decade, Rapinoe has seen her role transition into one that includes leadership.  She has competed in the Olympics twice, she has two World Cup experiences behind her and she was named one of three captains for the national team in 2018.”My role has gone through a lot of different stages at this point. Youngest to oldest. From one of the ones being mentored to being a mentor. I just try to take it all in stride,” Rapinoe told Omnisport. Related News Megan Rapinoe was once the youngest on the U.S. women’s national team when she joined in 2006 at 21 years old.She knows what it’s like to be new to the international stage and she understands how hard it is to transition from playing for a club team to representing the United States overseas.  Equal Play. Equal Pay. RESPECT. pic.twitter.com/nUclSUPAAx— Megan Rapinoe (@mPinoe) March 31, 2016Rapinoe has used her leadership role and her platform of being on the USWNT to help improve women’s soccer. She has become outspoken on major issues involving the sport, including gender equality between the women’s and the men’s game. Rapinoe said one of her main goals is to be a part of the generation that creates more opportunity for the younger players coming up.“I hope the league is in a better place, more robust,” Rapinoe said when asked where she believes the national team will be in 20 years. “This team hopefully continues to grow, continues to be successful. “Off the field, I hope we continue to break down stereotypes and push through what it means to be an athlete as a female. Not necessarily a female athlete, but to be a woman and be an athlete at the same time. Hopefully we can continue to evolve what that means and what that looks like.”What’s on Megan Rapinoe’s resume?44 international goals in 153 international appearances57 international assists, which is the fifth-most in USWNT historyFIFA Women’s World Cup Champion (2015), runner-up (2011)Olympic gold medalist (2012)CONCACAF Women’s Championship title (2014, 2018) Women’s World Cup 2019: Complete schedule for group stage It’s a role she’s embracing. And it’s one she does leading by example.“I’m not the type of person who’s going to sit the younger players down and give them a presentation or anything, but I think first and foremost the way that I conduct myself — I try and be professional and prepare myself well and be really focused on training,” she said. “I try to understand what they’re going through and help them through it.”This energy right here 🤤@mPinoe x #AllEyesOnUS pic.twitter.com/AqpKKlmM01— U.S. Soccer WNT (@USWNT) April 19, 2019U.S. coach Jill Ellis acknowledged that the national team roster has a handful of veterans, including Rapinoe, who have taken the Americans’ leadership to another level.Ellis explained that when a new player comes to the team and struggles with one aspect of the game, she directs them to the veterans to gain perspective from those who have been doing it for a while. “In terms of our leadership, I think we still have a great core of veterans as a part of our roster,” Ellis said at the team’s World Cup media day last month. “I think it normally falls on those players to share their experiences. Make sure there’s a push when there needs to be a push and make sure there’s an arm around a shoulder when that’s needed as well for our younger players. I feel very good about the core of our team and the makeup of our team and the character.”Now that Rapinoe has 153 international appearances behind her, she said she has more capacity to mentor the younger players. “What I’ve noticed as I’ve gotten older is there’s just certain things that you don’t know until you know,” Rapinoe said. “And there’s a lot of us that have been through a lot of different situations from qualifying to World Cups to a couple different leagues and so my role is just to relay my experience to the younger kids and just give them a head start by giving them a heads up.”last_img read more