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Morgan, Press fire USWNT past England, into World Cup final

first_imgSteph Houghton missed a controversial late penalty as holders the United States beat England 2-1 to reach a third successive Women’s World Cup final, despite missing inspirational co-captain Megan Rapinoe.The Lionesses had the opportunity to at least force extra-time with an 84th-minute spot-kick, but Houghton’s poor effort was saved and Millie Bright saw red late on as USA held on to ensure their title defence goes to the final stage.Rapinoe’s absence, said to be due to a hamstring issue, provided a pre-match shock, but Christen Press made a swift impact as her replacement when heading in the opener, before Ellen White’s equaliser was cancelled out by Morgan nodding in just past the half-hour mark on her birthday. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare England produced a good response in the second half and White had a second goal ruled out for straying marginally offside, before Alyssa Naeher easily saved Houghton’s penalty and a frustrated Bright earned a second booking, providing a disappointing end for Phil Neville’s side.4 – England have taken more penalties (4) and missed more penalties (3) than any other side at the 2019 Women’s World Cup. Pressure. #FIFAWWC #Lionesses pic.twitter.com/QJEVqXXxvW — OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) July 2, 2019 A breathless start resulted in USA opening the scoring early, with Press meeting Kelley O’Hara’s deep cross with a fine header into the top-left corner.But England – who had looked overwhelmed – levelled nine minutes later, White expertly guiding Beth Mead’s left-wing cross into the top-right corner with a first-time effort.Morgan ensured USA went into the break ahead, however, racing on to Lindsey Horan’s lofted pass and glancing a header beyond Carly Telford, before appearing to mock England in her celebration, as she pretended to sip from a cup of tea.The Lionesses improved after the break and thought they had the equaliser 23 minutes from time as White converted after Jill Scott’s gorgeous flicked pass, but a VAR review deemed the striker to have been just offside.Another VAR referral nine minutes from time gave England a penalty after Becky Sauerbrunn was deemed to have fouled White with the goal at her mercy, but Houghton’s feeble effort, taken a full three minutes later, was easily saved.Bright then showed her annoyance with a strong tackle on Morgan that earned her a second yellow card, and USA subsequently finished the job. KEY OPTA FACTS- USA have won their past 11 matches at the Women’s World Cup, the best winning streak in the tournament’s history.- USA are the first side in Women’s World Cup history to reach the final in three successive editions, making their record fifth appearance in total.- England have taken (four) and missed (three) more penalties than any other side at the 2019 Women’s World Cup.- White is the first English player in history to score in five consecutive World Cup appearances.- White has scored six goals at the 2019 Women’s World Cup. No English player has scored more goals than her in a single World Cup tournament (Harry Kane – six in 2018 and Gary Lineker – six in 1986).  read morelast_img read more

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Millions of childrens lives hang in the balance as South Sudan conflict

“I have just spent two days in South Sudan where I saw first-hand how four years of a man-made conflict have left children sick, hungry and on the brink of death,” Henrietta H. Fore, the Executive Director of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), said Thursday in the capital, Juba, as she wrapped up her visit.She said the impact of the relentless violence has been devastating. She recalled meeting a mother who had to walk for days to get treatment for her malnourished baby. Recounting another grim incident, Ms. Fore said she had spoken with a young boy who was forced to join an armed group at the age of 10.At the same time, she said, she saw “signs of hope” emanating from the families experiencing the horror. “UNICEF and other aid agencies are working on the ground in some of the most dangerous conditions to provide children and young people with their basic needs. This is no small feat,” she said, describing South Sudan “the most dangerous place in the world for humanitarians” as 28 aid workers were killed last year alone.VIDEO: During her visit to South Sudan, new Executive Director of UNICEF, Henrietta Fore, urges end to conflict to bring back hope and safety for the young people of the strife-torn nation.Forces loyal to President Salva Kiir and his former Vice-President Rieck Machar, have been battling for the past five years, turning what began in 2013 as a political rivalry into all out conflict that, according to the UN relief wing, has left some seven million people in need of assistance and protection, and forced more than two million to flee to neighbouring countries.Ms. Fore noted that the fighting shows no sign of abating and the humanitarian needs are massive: 2.4 million children have been forced to flee their homes. More than a quarter of a million children are severely malnourished and at imminent risk of death. Over 19,000 children have been recruited into the conflict. At least one in three schools has been damaged, destroyed, occupied or closed. More than 1,200 cases of sexual violence against children have been documented. “The numbers go on and on. Together they equal an entire generation of young people denied the opportunities they so desperately need to contribute to building their society,” she said.As the dry season approaches, the needs – and threats – will only continue to grow. “Only an end to hostilities can bring back hope and safety to the children and young people of South Sudan. Until then, we need unconditional, sustainable access from parties to the conflict and more resources from donors,” she said. “Without these, the lives and futures of millions of children in South Sudan will continue to hang in the balance.” read more