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Dancing Day to Night at Full Moon Festival

first_imgWe are a big fan of music festivals here at The Manual, if you haven’t noticed already. As we enter into the second half of summer, we look back at some of the year’s best like SXSW, Governor’s Ball and Hudson Music Project. But to kick off the month of August, we’re counting down the days to one of our favorite musical events of the year – Full Moon. Taking place on New York City’s Governor’s Island, the fest is inspired by the famous full moon celebration parties of Southeast Asia, bringing a curated lineup of of musicians, DJs, artists and chefs to this incredible beach fete in the middle of a massive metropolis. Hosted by MATTE Projects, a music-focused creative production company, Full Moon is about to enter its fourth year with three successful, sold-out shows under its belt. Founded in 2011 by Max Pollack, Brett Kincaid and joined in 2013 by creative director Matthew Rowean, MATTE works to create immersive musical experiences with a focus on visuals and artistic collaborations. They have worked with some of the world’s most iconic brands like Soho House, Maison Kitsuné and Interview Magazine. The music, of course, is the main reason we’re excited for Full Moon. The lineup of talent is killer, including acts like Delorean, The Knocks, Wave Racer and Young & Sick. In addition to art and sound, Full Moon is bringing some of the city’s best chefs and restaurants to the fest with bites from the likes of Mile End, Tacombi, An Choi and Brooklyn Star. Good food, amazing music and NYC’s finest dancing for hours on end? Yeah, count us in. The Full Moon Festival takes place Friday, August 8th on Governor’s Island in New York City. The music starts at 4pm and goes until midnight. To purchase tickets, visit fullmoonfest.com. We’ll see you there! All 21 Six Flags Parks in the U.S., Ranked Smart Practices for Drinking With the Environment in Mind 6 Fastest Cars in the World Right Now Editors’ Recommendations 10 Best Whiskies for Irish Coffee 9 Best Fall Beers to Drink This Year, According to the Brewing Expertslast_img read more

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Security Council discusses latest violence engulfing Kenya

30 January 2008The Security Council today heard a closed-door briefing on the situation in Kenya, where post-electoral violence has claimed hundreds of lives, including dozens in recent days, while forcing more than a quarter of a million others to flee their homes. In New York, Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs B. Lynn Pascoe briefed the Council on the latest developments in the East African nation, where nearly 700 people are believed to have been killed in the violence, which first began a few weeks ago after Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki was declared the winner over opposition leader Raila Odinga in December elections.Speaking to reporters following the meeting, Mr. Pascoe said that there is a “need for the parties to work together” to bring the violence to an end.Voicing support for the mediation efforts of former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, he said the Organization has been deeply involved from the start to bring the situation under control. Additionally, he said that numerous humanitarian organizations have been active on the ground and providing assistance to those forced to flee their homes.During the Council meeting, members “called on Kenya’s leaders to do all what is in their power to bring the violence to an end and to restore calm,” Ambassador Giadalla Ettalhi of Libya, which holds the rotating Council presidency this month, told the press.Meanwhile in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon discussed the situation with the African Union Chairperson, Alpha Oumar Konaré, ahead of his address to the AU summit tomorrow.The two leaders agreed that the AU and UN should support the current efforts by former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, according to a spokesperson for the world body.UN agencies are warning that Kenya’s crisis has taken a sharp turn for the worse in recent days with violence claiming many more lives and hampering relief efforts. read more