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Timmy’s lands upmarket pie deal

first_imgAt less than a year old, pie business Timmy’s Pies is celebrating a deal to supply its six-strong range to top-end department store Harvey Nichols.Timmy’s Pies began life on the Duke of York market, London, in April last year, with founder Timmy Wilkes making the decision to upscale and rent premises at a professional kitchen in the summer.Wilkes told British Baker that another producer, working from the same premises, currently supplied Harvey Nichols and was aware its food buyer was looking for someone to supply it with some new and interesting pies.Wilkes said the buyer especially liked the seasonal approach he took with his menu. His pies change with the four seasons, with the current range featuring hare ragu and mushroom; wild boar and apple; slow cooked beef with chilli; and a chicken, leek and tarragon.The firm has just delivered the first order to the retailer, currently only 20-30 pies a week, but Wilkes is hoping to grow this order in the future. Timmy’s Pies also supplies Union Market, in Fulham Broadway, and has just started selling pies to The People’s Supermarket in Londonlast_img read more

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South Bend Cubs looking to put cardboard cutouts in the stands until tickets can…

first_img South Bend Cubs looking to put cardboard cutouts in the stands until tickets can be sold Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend MarketSports By Tommie Lee – March 30, 2021 0 256 Pinterest Facebook Google+ Twitter Pinterest (photo/South Bend Cubs) The South Bend Cubs are offering fans the chance to hang out in the stands as cardboard cutouts before tickets are made available for the 2021 season.The Cubs Cutouts will be in rows A and B at Four Winds Field during home games, but only a limited number will be available. Fans can pose alone, with family members, friends or even pets in their photos.Each cutout is only 30 dollars. Orders must be received by April 19t to have your cutout in the stands for Opening Night on May 4th.You can learn more by clicking here. Previous articleNotre Dame announces plan to vaccinate studentsNext articleCOVID is costing Michigan teachers at an alarming rate Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Speech: Amanda Spielman’s speech at the ASCL annual conference 2018

first_imgSet out like that, it should be clear that it’s only in my power to change one of these things directly – and only half of one at that! But nevertheless I want to turn to what we can do to ensure that inspection does not generate unnecessary workload.To start with, we have been clear about what we actually look at on inspection and, more importantly, what we don’t. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, we do not want to see a performance on inspection. We do not want anything special to be created. We do not want you to produce “Ofsted-ready files”. And, above all, we do not want you to employ consultants to perform mocksteds.What we want to see on inspection is an accurate reflection of what happens in your school. Yes, we want to see how you approach assessment. We want to see good teaching. We absolutely want to be sure that your leadership is effective. But we want to see all of that just as you approach it day-to-day, not as a special presentation for Ofsted.Some of you will say I’m naïve; others might use more choice words, if I were to suggest that we can make inspection a low stress event just like any other day. Fair enough.After all, if you were to say to your pupils: “Oh, don’t worry about that GCSE or that A-Level; it’s just a reflection of what you’ve learnt”, you’d get a similar response.Inspections will always to some degree induce anxiety, which might lead to stress: that’s human nature. You want to give the best account of your work. But most inspections are for just a day, so that stress shouldn’t build up for weeks and months before. If your school is working well week in, week out, you will get a good Ofsted judgement regardless of how much preparation you put into it.I really hope that you do listen when we try to bust specific myths about inspection. I am sure many of you already follow the one-man, Twitter myth-busting machine that is Sean Harford, and if you don’t then you probably should.I won’t repeat all of those individual myths here today, except to say that, when you see a myth being busted, please make sure your staff know it as well. Few things are more depressing to me than reading the results of our latest teacher survey and finding that most teachers still think we have a preferred style of teaching. Significant minorities think we still grade individual lessons or want to see lesson plans. In truth, we cannot reach every teacher directly, but through you, we can.At the same time, if there are new myths emerging, let us know and we will be more than happy to take steps to bust them. Even though I am sure Sean’s wife would appreciate it if he spent slightly fewer evenings playing triple-marking whack-a-mole.So that’s the myths, what about the reality?Well, we are also trying to make sure that the process of inspection is as painless as possible. Since January, we have been running a new model for short inspections of good schools. The early feedback from those inspections is very positive, and I want to thank Steve Rollett here for his work in helping us get this model right.Underpinning our new approach is our belief that it is better to catch an institution before it falls, than to give it an immediate requires improvement judgement. The new model gives those with a few areas of weakness time to improve, before we return for a full inspection. In the meantime, there should be no confusion: your ‘good’ judgement remains, and you avoid the consequences that can flow from an RI [requires improvement] grade.There will be times when we find more severe weaknesses or where our risk assessment model indicates that a school could be experiencing a major decline. In those situations, it is right that a full inspection happens immediately. But, for schools with just a handful of areas to improve, we think the right approach is to give them the time to do so.In a similar vein, we have removed the 3 strikes rule. There was a presumption that a school should be graded inadequate, if after two RI outcomes a third inspection did not show that it had improved to good. Instead, we are letting our inspectors use their discretion to judge a school as it stands, regardless of its inspection history.Other steps we have taken include a new approach to safeguarding. In training our inspectors this year, we have moved away from a compliance approach. I’m thinking here, for example, of stories of fences being too low. Instead, we want our inspectors to look at whether a good safeguarding culture runs throughout the school. Fewer tick boxes; more focus on how schools identify risks of serious harm, and help young people to be safe.We’ve also stopped reporting on performance management arrangements. Inspectors are not requesting anonymised lists of teachers who did or didn’t achieve an increment on the pay scale.And that leads me on to one of my biggest bugbears in the world of education; the misuse of data. Anyone who has ever worked with me will know that I’m not averse to a bit of analysis. Evidence-based approaches to education are the right approaches. I don’t believe that an HMI can walk into a school, take a quick sniff and come to an instant judgement.But that doesn’t mean that our inspectors should need, or want, to see endless pages of data, cut to the nth degree on 10 different pupil characteristics. The other day I was horrified to see an example from a school of a pie-chart of pupil performance data based on the results of 3 pupils. Torturing data is not just pointless. There is work in creating those analyses. There is work in discussing them and all too often many of the differences they may seem to show are probably just statistical noise. And there is work in designing and delivering interventions to address those apparent differences, and some of those aren’t really justified. And I know that some of it happens because we have tended to over-analyse data too.So we have been working on this one too. Our intention is always to use data as the starting point, not as the end point, for inspection. We have redesigned inspection data reports to reduce the likelihood of over-interpretation. We have trained our inspectors to know what inferences they can and cannot draw from the data. And since September, we have operated a new analyst helpdesk to support inspectors.There are also more direct measures looking at workload. In September, we added a new question to our staff questionnaire. It asks whether ‘Leaders and managers take workload into account when developing and implementing new policies and procedures, so as to avoid placing unnecessary burdens on staff’. Quite a mouthful.But, I can now share the first results from that question. Only 8% of staff disagreed or disagreed strongly, which I am sure will come as some encouragement to you. In fact 77% agreed or agreed strongly that leaders do take workload into account.Of course, there is an inevitable bias to the positive in this question. Few people want to jeopardise their school’s inspection. So we are looking at how we can best use this question. On inspection itself, we are not using the responses to downgrade leadership and management. We are using them as part of the discussion with leaders about the way they run their schools.I am loath to go any further, just at the moment, to commit Ofsted to directly judging leaders’ approach to workload. I am sure there is room for us to look at more under the leadership and management judgement. But adding something to the Ofsted framework never has a subtle impact. Unless we think through our approach carefully, perverse incentives will follow. And the very last thing I want is for Ofsted to become a wedge between staff and management. So I am not ruling out taking a closer look at workload on inspection, but I want to do this gradually, and in discussion with the sector.That takes me to the final area where I see scope for us to tackle workload. That is through the new education inspection framework that my team is developing for 2019.A top priority for me is to make sure that the framework explores the things that either give a good judgement of educational effectiveness or are vital to young people’s development. The alternative is a giant basket full of things that dilute the validity of our judgement and create lots of extra work for you.To give you a flavour, here are just some of the things that have been suggested for inclusion in the Ofsted framework in the past year: volunteering gang education school meal quality swimming capability home cooking skills first aid school to school collaboration knife awareness resilience democratic engagement the curriculum survey, which is helping us to define what a good curriculum looks like, in terms of intent, and implementation and impact international research on lesson observation, and what can and cannot be gleaned from it a review of book scrutiny practice and, again, what it can and what it cannot tell inspectors about standards in a school broader work on the validity and reliability of our inspections and the link with educational effectiveness and finally, in response to feedback from teachers – a research programme on workload and well-being, focused on schools that manage this well. Can I start by saying how pleased I am to be here today. Those of you who were at last year’s conference may remember that it was my first big speech as Chief Inspector. I used that speech to lay out some of my priorities for Ofsted and what I hoped to achieve. So it’s great to be back here today to present my own self-evaluation for year one. I got some feedback from some of you last night, and look forward to getting more today.What a year it has been. I’m a strong believer that chief inspectors and politics don’t mix, so I won’t dwell on some of the more high profile events of the past year. But even in our own world of education we’ve seen some major changes, including the arrival of both Geoff and Damian.I must admit there was some trepidation in Ofsted Towers at Geoff’s election. I think it’s fair to say the platform he ran on wasn’t entirely ‘Ofsted friendly’. But since taking up office, we’ve found him to be – yes, tough and determined – but also constructive and pragmatic. Working together, we’ve already been able to find solutions to some thorny issues and I think there’s much more we can do in future.Returning to the substanceLast year I made clear my desire for all of us to shift our focus back to the ‘substance of education’. The question I asked was: how do we make sure our efforts are directed at giving young people a knowledge-rich education that sets them up to succeed, as opposed to hunting for performance table prizes and stickers. It’s a theme I continued throughout the year, developed through a big research programme looking at the curriculum in schools and in colleges.I have been genuinely thrilled with the debate and discussion that have followed. Although I know not everyone has agreed with all of our conclusions, many have and there is an almost universal agreement that the essential diagnosis is right. For too long, the curriculum – the thing that should lie at the heart of educational thinking – has come second to the pressures of accountability and performance tables.Ofsted has of course played its part here: we haven’t put enough emphasis on curriculum in the framework and, as a result, may have contributed to a vicious cycle, whereby schools have done the same.I am pleased that ASCL recognises many of these issues. I have enjoyed sitting on your commission on ethical leadership, which I know has reported at this conference. Its emphasis on making sure school leaders make the right decisions, for the right reasons, is entirely correct.Here, I have to put in my usual disclaimer, lest there be any mischief from our friends in the education press. I am not opposed to accountability: indeed it would be a rather odd position for the head of an inspectorate to take. I think that Progress 8, new SATs, GCSEs and A-Levels are broadly good things. But I do maintain that success in these measures should flow from a rich curriculum, rather than tests of all kinds and performance tables dictating the curriculum itself.Spending time on the right thingsSo today I want to continue that theme of the substance of education, but from a different perspective. Following on from Geoff, I want to look at how Ofsted can play its part in reducing workload, so that you’re able to focus on the things that matter to you and to your pupils.Because, at the end of the day, it really doesn’t matter what an inspectorate thinks if we can’t attract good people into teaching. The record number of good and outstanding schools won’t be sustained if the people, who make them run so well, are burning out, and leaving the profession.When I see NQTs brimming with passion to change young lives for the better, I think it’s an utter travesty that so many end up losing their early enthusiasm because of the pressures of the job. Especially when so many of those pressures are entirely unnecessary.Because that’s what endless data cuts, triple marking, 10 page lesson plans, and, worst of all, mocksteds are: a distraction from the core purpose of education. And a costly distraction at that. Many will say that these have been driven by Ofsted and the wider accountability framework, not by school and college leaders themselves, and I’ll come to that in a minute. But, as Geoff has said so clearly, ethical leadership is what should drive your actions.That said, clearly Ofsted isn’t blameless and we must go on doing all we can to support removing unnecessary workload for teachers and school leaders. So I want to talk about some of the steps that we have been taking to cut out the guff and direct the focus back to what matters.I want this to be a frank discussion. Because, we know there is no silver bullet. As I see it, there are 5 major drivers of workload: Government policies and requirements, which schools and teachers must follow. Accountability through performance tables and inspection. The consequences of accountability – what governing bodies, LAs, MATs or RSCs do as a result of an Ofsted judgement or a set of results. The fear of litigation if schools do not take a belt and braces approach, particularly on things like health and safety. And finally, how policies and accountability measures are translated by school leaders into day-to-day management tools such as policies for planning, assessment and marking. And there are many more. Don’t get me wrong, I think all of these are valuable suggestions. But every time we add something to our framework, we dilute the focus on the substance of education and we create more work for schools. So I intend to make sure that the new framework is as sharply focused as possible on the things that matter most.The framework development is supported by our research programme, which currently includes: I hope you can see from the steps we are taking, that I do not believe excessive workload is inevitable! I know that you, and all the dedicated professionals who work for you, will always want to go above and beyond for young people. But what we can do is to make sure that you’re going above and beyond for the right reasons.And that does mean you as school and college leaders playing your part – and Geoff has talked eloquently about that today. You have to take tough decisions in your institutions all the time. Some of those decisions create work, that’s inevitable. But when you do take them, please be clear why you are taking them, and accept where the responsibility is yours. In the long run, to do anything else only undermines confidence and morale.Thank you for listening today, and for the opportunity to share a platform with Geoff and Damian. I am really confident that by working together we can make a real difference and make sure that teaching is the attractive, challenging and rewarding profession it deserves to be.Thank you.last_img read more

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Video: Latest Fantasy updates from Bristol

first_img___________________________________________________________________________________________We apologize. We are having technical issues with our comment sections and fan community and it is temporarily unavailable. We are actively working on these issues and hope to have it up and running soon. We are also working on enhancements to provide a better forum for our fans. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.last_img

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Kansas governor: Medical pot should fund Medicaid expansion

first_imgOVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly is proposing that Kansas legalize marijuana for medical use to generate revenues that would finance an expansion of the state’s Medicaid health coverage for the needy. Kelly announced her proposal Monday. Kelly has made expanding Medicaid for as many as 165,000 additional Kansas residents a top priority since becoming governor two years ago, but top Republicans in the GOP-controlled Legislature have prevented its passage. Kelly also previously said she’d sign a medical marijuana bill but she hadn’t actively pushed the idea. She is wedding two ideas that are likely to face strong opposition among Republican legislative leaders and many rank-and-file GOP lawmakers.last_img

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Chris Myers on Retail Hell & Being Behind Bars in Whorl Inside a Loop

first_img View Comments Age: 27Hometown: New York CityCurrent Role: Playing convicted felon Jeffrey, who is more vulnerable and shy than his fellow inmates, as well as a lisping female minister, a five-year-old boy and a certain crisply coiffed presidential candidate in Dick Scanlan and Sherie Rene Scott’s prison-set drama Whorl Inside a Loop.Stage Cred: Myers won an Obie Award for his performance in last season’s An Octoroon. His other off-Broadway credits include Brownsville Song, Little Children Dream of God and more.“I grew up on the Upper West Side and still live there. I was an only child with a single mom. There was a lot of empty space in my life for my imagination to keep me occupied.”“I observed an acting class doing King Lear. The guy playing King Lear was absent, so the teacher turned to me and said, ‘You’re not just going to watch—you’re going to get up here.’ That was my introduction to acting; I was nine.”“My first job was at Pinkberry in SoHo. The customers were a lot of fashion people. It was not for me. Then I worked at Converse, where the shoppers were a lot of Europeans on vacation. I couldn’t take it.”“I was supporting myself as a DJ for a while after Juilliard. Working as an actor started to conflict with that—you can’t be in the club until four when you have an audition the next morning. I am now supporting myself solely as an actor; it’s been an adjustment.”“An Octoroon came out of nowhere for me, but it was such an important experience. It was jarring and mind-blowingly weird, but I knew I could put my heart into it. I was expecting protests outside the theater, not unanimous critical appraisal.”“I’ve been privileged to work on some pieces that have social implications and Whorl Inside a Loop fits that pattern. I’ve taught in prisons and marched for prison reform; the themes the play is dealing with are really important to me.” Related Shows Whorl Inside a Loop Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 27, 2015last_img read more

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Invasive species

first_imgAs outdoor enthusiasts start making their pack lists for spring camping trips, it’s a good time to think about what shouldn’t be taken on camping ventures: invasive species. Georgia and the southeastern United States are home to many invasive species, which threaten the region’s crops, waterways and forests. Often forest pests infect a new stand of trees by hitching a ride on unsuspecting campers’ firewood, said Joe LaForest, a forest health specialist with the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. While it may be tempting to use the rest of that winter wood pile on camping trips, you run the risk of destroying your favorite camping spot by transporting potentially devastating insects from your neighborhood into a national forest or park. “Firewood is one of the main conduits for wood beetles and for other invasive insects,” LaForest said. “You really don’t want to be moving wood at all. Some people are saying, ‘Oh well, I can take it to my friend’s house so we can build a fire there,’ but you never know what you’re moving around.” Moving wood down the street or a few blocks isn’t as big of a problem, but wood shouldn’t be moved more than 10 miles. Most campgrounds and national parks sell firewood that’s been harvested in that area, and that’s the safest bet for keeping forests safe. “It is really hard to convince people not to do it,” LaForest said. “But it’s really a risk you don’t want to take. Even if you burn all of the wood you bring, if you were camping for two days you don’t know if something crawled out of that wood.” If you have wood leftover from your camping trip, it’s better to leave it there for the next camper than to bring it home — possibly infecting the trees around your home. Some of the pests that are more worrisome to Georgia foresters now are the emerald ash borer, which is as close as Tennessee. It destroys all native ash trees. The walnut twig beetle, which is also in Tennessee, causes thousand cankers disease and slowly kills black walnut trees. Georgia plays hosts to the redbay ambrosia beetle, which causes laurel wilt. It can also cut down important crop trees like avocado, an important crop in neighboring states like Florida. Those looking for more information about the specific pests that can be transported on firewood can check www.gatrees.org/forest-management/forest-health/dont-move-firewood. Some ways to protect the ecosystem of Georgia and our neighboring states from invasive species include: Clean hiking boots, waders, boats and trailers and off-road equipment after use to prevent invasive insects and plants from hitchhiking. Remove invasive plants from your land. Don’t dump live bait into streams, lakes or the ocean. Don’t dump aquarium fish or other pets into the wild. Learn what invasive species are in your area. Report new invasive species. For more information about invasive species, campers should download the center’s Bugwood app series for Android and Apple phones and tablets at apps.bugwood.org. One app, Firewood Buddy, details the types of pest that can be transported in firewood and offers fire-building tips and recipes. Another, What’s Invasive?, provides a layperson’s identification guide to invasive insects and plants. Other ways to stop invasive species are available at www.invasives.org.last_img read more

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Peach Research

first_imgThe late-March cold spell caused some Georgia peach growers to lose a portion of their crop, but consumers should see a typical selection of fruit when the first Georgia-grown varieties ripen this month, said University of Georgia scientist Dario Chavez. “We should see pretty much the same season as usual,” said Chavez, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researcher, hired a year ago to study Georgia’s peach crop and work closely with the state’s growers. “We lost some volume, but across the board, the crop looks good.”Peaches, like blueberries, need cold weather to move into and out of dormancy. The amount of cold they need is referred to as “chill hours,” or the number of hours below 45-degree temperatures the tree receives, he said. “Last fall we started having cold weather and the trees started to shut down. Once that happens, temperatures go down and the tree begins to accumulate chill hours from October to February,” Chavez explained.This year, Georgia peach trees got the average number of chill hours they needed.“All the trees got their required chill and then, as soon as it got a little warmer, the trees moved really fast and started flowering around the middle of March,” he said.Most Georgia peaches are grown in middle Georgia, down Highway 19 toward Fort Valley. “The first peaches that will come in will be Flavorich and Carored (varieties) around May 18. From then on, the flood gates will open until the end of August,” Chavez said.The Elberta peach was—and still is, for some—the favorite variety among Georgians based on its reputation and size. Today, Chavez is working with consumers’ taste preferences in mind, not the size of the peach or the number each tree produces.“If you ask people from Georgia which peach is their favorite, they will say O’Henry or Elberta (varieties). Peach eaters have their preferences, but there has to be some reason that they like that variety,” he said. Over the years, unique peach flavors have been lost because breeders have focused on yield, he said. At grocery stores, consumers can see the state where the peaches were grown, but not always the variety name.“Commercially, you don’t know which ones you are buying. But Georgia consumers may know when certain varieties should be ripe and they may have even picked them at a you-pick farm,” Chavez said.Chavez is building the UGA peach research program from the ground up on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. He grafted 300 peach trees last June, including 120 different varieties that grow well in the Southeast.Approximately 800 trees will soon be planted on the UGA Dempsey Farm in Griffin, in what will become Chavez’s research orchard. “There are some old-time varieties and some of the more popular, newer varieties,” he said.In the fall, he will use the new orchard to study irrigation systems’ delivery of fertilizer. “This would save the amount of fertilizer used, bring a lot of savings to the farmers and reduce environmental impact. California has tight water regulations and Georgia is probably headed that way, too,” he said. Chavez aims to have water management plans for peach trees ready to share with farmers when drought conditions occur.To search for breeding stock that consumers will like, Chavez is working with UGA sensory specialist Koushik Adhikari to evaluate consumer perception and preference to multiple peach varieties.“Basically, we are searching for the building blocks. Once we identify consumer preferences, we will start to breed new peach varieties with those compounds and characteristics in collaboration with Chunxian Chen, the USDA-ARS Fruit and Nut Research Lab’s peach scion breeder in Byron, Georgia,” he said.With UGA weed scientist Mark Czarnota, Chavez is monitoring the effects of long-term herbicide use on tree health, roots and performance.“We have also found some persistent weeds growing near peach trees. We need to know if there is a compound that will control these weeds because they can really dramatically reduce production,” he said.Chavez works closely with peach growers through the Georgia Peach Council and the Georgia Agricultural Commodity Commission for Peaches. “Statistics say we have 224 peach growers in Georgia, but five growers grow about 90 percent of the acreage in the state,” he said.Georgia devotes 11,998 acres to peaches with a farm gate value of more than $55.4 million, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. The top producing counties in 2013 were Crawford, Peach, Macon, Taylor, Meriwether and Schley.last_img read more

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Voigt named as first appointment to LaMarche Endowed Chair at Saint Michael’s College

first_imgVoigt named as first appointment to LaMarche Endowed Chair at Saint Michael’s CollegeEssex junction resident, Dennis Voigt, associate professor of accounting at Saint Michael’s College, was named the first appointment to the David LaMarche Chair in Business Administration and Accounting at the college in ceremonies on campus Oct. 25. Officiating at the event were SMC President John Neuahuser, PhD; Business Department Chair Robert Letovsky, PhD; Vice President for Academic Affairs Karen Talentino, PhD, and Dean of the College Jeffrey Trumbower, PhD.The ceremony also included the induction of 26 Saint Michael’s seniors and four master’s students into Sigma Beta Delta, the international honor society in business, management and administration. Honoree David LaMarche, Emeritus Professor of Business Administration and Accounting, former resident of Essex Junction, was the featured speaker at the induction ceremony.Professor LaMarche urged the inductees to consider all those they will be able to influence when they are in positions of authority and leadership. Speaking with passion and eloquence, he reminded them to treat others as they would themselves want to be treated, and he spoke of several recent instances when that simple rule had not been followed with dire consequences resulting.Professor David LaMarche taught at Saint Michael’s from 1974 to 2001, and served as vice president of finance, vice president for academic affairs, and assistant to the president, at various times in his career. Professor LaMarche travelled to the ceremonies from his home in South Carolina, with his wife Jane LaMarche, former trustee of Saint Michael’s. He was praised at the ceremonies by his colleagues for his rare commitment to the college and for his profound enhancement of teaching in the Department of Business Administration and Accounting.Professor LaMarche spoke of the generosity and leadership of the late Edmund Cashman and of his wife Susan, benefactors of the endowed chair. Mr. Cashman was a graduate of the Saint Michael’s class of 1958 and a former SMC trustee.Professor Voigt helping revise business department curriculumProfessor Voigt, named to the three-year appointment to the LaMarche professorship, was commended as “an excellent choice” by Dr. Trumbower. He was extensively praised by his colleagues for his leadership in shaping and revising the curriculum for the SMC Department of Business Administration and Accounting. Professor Voigt was an adjunct professor for 13 years at Saint Michael’s from 1977 to 1990, while also creating his own firm and working as senior manager at KPMG Peat Marwick. He joined the SMC faculty full-time in 1990, teaching Financial Managerial Fundamentals, Intermediate Accounting, and Management Information Systems.The David LaMarche Chair is only the second chair to be endowed at the college. An endowed chair must be funded to a level sufficient to supply, through the return on investment, the salary and benefits for the chaired professor every year.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 368 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students. In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michael’s professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last eight years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings.-30-last_img read more

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BRO on the Newsplex: Crown Grants in Virginia

first_imgOn this week’s appearance on WCAV-TV, the Charlottesville Newsplex, Online Editor Jack Murray discusses Crown Grants in Virginia, and their effect on landowners, fly fishermen, paddlers, and outdoor enthusiasts across the Commonwealth.You can read more about this issue as it pertains to the Hazel and Jackson rivers in the pages of Blue Ridge Outdoors and online.last_img