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Illinois state trooper dies after being shot serving warrant

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) — The Illinois state trooper who was shot early Friday morning while serving a warrant in East St. Louis has died, police said.Nicholas Hopkins, who was a member of the state police’s SWAT unit, was shot at approximately 5:26 a.m. and was pronounced dead at a local hospital at 6:10 p.m. The 33-year-old had been with the Illinois State Police for 10 years.“It is with profound heartache and unfathomable sadness that we inform you of the death of Trooper Nicholas Hopkins. Trooper Hopkins laid down his life while protecting the citizens of this state,” said Illinois State Police acting Director Brendan Kelly. “We are asking the public to respectfully give consideration to the family of Trooper Hopkins and the ISP while we continue to grieve and work through this tragedy.”After the shooting, the suspect in the case holed up in the home on North 42nd Street in East St. Louis, just across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri, in southwestern Illinois.Hours later, three people were taken into custody at the scene, police said.Hopkins was married with three children. His brother is also a police officer in Illinois.“Today the entire state mourns the loss of ISP South SWAT Trooper Nicholas Hopkins, a young man who dedicated 10 of his 33 years on this earth to protecting the people of Illinois,” Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker said in a statement. “It is the most courageous among us who choose a life of risk so their communities can go about their lives in peace. The state of Illinois stands with Trooper Hopkins’ family and the entire Illinois State Police family as they grieve the loss of another heroic officer.”A heavily armored SWAT vehicle moved in on the home Friday afternoon and drove through the front door. A small explosion could also be seen as the vehicle crashed into the home.It is not clear why the suspect was being served with a search warrant, nor whether the shooter was related to the warrant.The suspect’s name has not been released.Hopkins’ death came exactly one week after another Illinois State Police trooper was shot while serving a warrant in Wheeling, Illinois, outside of Chicago. The officer suffered non-life threatening injuries in the shooting and the suspect, Volodymyr Dragan, 43, has been charged with attempted murder. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Propertymark kicks off sporting spend at Sky-broadcast matches

first_imgPropertymark, the new property brand formerly known as NFoPP launched in February, is to promote its new identity on perimeter boards at 20 sporting events to be broadcast by Sky Sports this year.It is part of a significant push by the NAEA, ARLA and NAVA to present themselves as consumer – rather than just industry – champions to the public.The new campaign will include three cricket matches, six rugby matches and a single football fixture, Scunthorpe United versus Bradford City on the 24th March.The rest of the events include a Rugby Union Varsity match at Twickenham on December 7th as well as an under-20s England versus Scotland match and the Rugby League Super League Grand Final at Old Trafford on October 7th.Propertymark says the campaign, which will feature its new green logo, is to be seen by an audience of 9.5 million between the ages of 18 and 65 on Sky during the events.“This demonstrates our commitment to support Propertymark to benefit members by reaching a wide and relevant consumer audience via popular televised Sky Sports events,” says Propertymark.Long traditionPropertymark joins a long tradition of estate agents backing sport financially. In recent years this has included Zoopla which in 2012 paid hundreds of thousands of pounds to be the main sponsor of Premier League football club West Bromwich Albion for three years until 2015.Also, online agent FindaHome.com sponsored Port Vale Football Club in 2015, while last year London agent Kinleigh Hayward & Folkard signed up to a one-year deal to sponsor the first team of the regional Isthmian league club Dulwich Hamlet FC, and has also sponsored its youth teams.propertymark sky tv March 13, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Associations & Bodies » Propertymark kicks off sporting spend at Sky-broadcast matches previous nextAssociations & BodiesPropertymark kicks off sporting spend at Sky-broadcast matchesUp to 9.5 million viewers and event crowds to see adverts.Nigel Lewis13th March 20170761 Viewslast_img read more

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Spain: EODMU 8 Conducts Exercise Magre

first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defense View post tag: Naval View post tag: Defence Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, Det. Europe participated in trilateral field training Exercise Magre at Naval Station Rota, Spain, Nov. 18 – 22.U.S., Spanish and German forces participated in the exercise that focused on improvised explosive device (IED)- related training including, using X-ray diagnostics, robots and other critical skill sets in combat environments.“The focus of this mission is to basically learn from each other,” said Lt. Aaron Holdren, EODMU 8, det. Europe officer in charge. “As we grow in the joint combat environment, we find that we work together on a regular basis. This gives an understanding of how we all do our jobs and how we can do it better while working together.”For members like Senior Chief Petty Officer Dirk Assmann, German navy explosive ordnance disposal technician, each visit to Rota offers a chance to learn a new tactical procedure.“It is necessary to do this type of training,” said Assmann. “If you’re training on your own, it is hard to improve from your mistakes. This way we can share and compare our knowledge and later incorporate it in standard operation procedures.”Assmann added that all units are very professional and knowledgeable concerning EOD tactics and procedures.“We are always accepted with opened arms,” said Assmann. “We’re used to training with Spanish forces throughout Europe and [the German navy has] a long relation with the U.S. It is always a pleasant experience with them.”The exercise concluded with a full mission profile; a final assessment that incorporated and tested the skills that were drilled throughout Exercise Magre.“The great thing is we are all EOD techs, therefore we can learn from each other,” said Holdren. “We have a vast number of years of experience between us as well as field experience.There is always something to be learned, and we can hone our skills and work better together. At the end of the day, when we are called upon, we are ready to go and can work together in the same fashion with an understanding on how to do each of our jobs.”[mappress]Press Release, November 27, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: £8 View post tag: conducts View post tag: Magre Spain: EODMU 8 Conducts Exercise Magrecenter_img November 27, 2013 View post tag: Exercise View post tag: EODMU Training & Education Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today Spain: EODMU 8 Conducts Exercise Magre View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

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SLNS Samudura Participates in Coastguard Exercise Off Male

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: asia View post tag: Exercise View post tag: SLNS Samudura SLNS Samudura Participates in Coastguard Exercise Off Male View post tag: Participates Sri Lanka Navy’s Offshore Patrol Vessel, SLNS Samudura took part in the coastguard exercise “DOSTI – XII” held in the seas off Male from October 28th to 31st 2014.The 4-day exercise was conducted jointly by Indian, Sri Lankan and Maldivian Coast Guards with the aim of strengthening bonds of friendship and enhancing mutual operational capability and cooperation. The twelfth edition of the tri-lateral coastguard exercise this year focused on Maritime Search and Rescue (M-SAR), Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR), Marine Pollution Response (POLRES) and anti-piracy operations.…Powered by Cincopa Video Hosting for Business solution.New Gallery 2014/11/4cameramake NIKON CORPORATIONheight 364dir: 0alt: 0lat: 0.000000long: 0.000000orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CS3 originaldate 10/28/2014 12:59:27 PMwidth 550cameramodel NIKON D700cameramake NIKON CORPORATIONheight 364dir: 0alt: 0lat: 0.000000long: 0.000000orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CS3 originaldate 10/30/2014 5:01:34 PMwidth 550cameramodel NIKON D700cameramake NIKON CORPORATIONheight 364dir: 0alt: 0lat: 0.000000long: 0.000000orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CS3 originaldate 10/29/2014 5:13:31 PMwidth 550cameramodel NIKON D90flash 16cameramake Canonheight 364dir: 0alt: 0lat: 0.000000long: 0.000000orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CS3 originaldate 10/30/2014 4:20:01 PMwidth 550cameramodel Canon EOS 5D Mark IIThe mutually beneficial exercise highlighted the importance of launching coordinated efforts to ensure the safety and security of sea-farers. Participants were able to gain valuable insights into achieving inter-operability which is vital for tackling piracy and related maritime security concerns in the geo-strategically important Indian Ocean.Representing the Indian Coast Guard, Indian Coast Guard Ships “Samar” and “Rajdoot” along with a Dornier aircraft took part while Maldivian Coast Guard Ships “Huravee” and “Shaheed Ali” of the Maldivian National Defence Force (MNDF) represented the Maldivian Coast Guard. The Sri Lanka Coast Guard was represented by SLNS Samudura under the command of Captain YMB Jayathilake of the Sri Lanka Navy. The Director General of the Sri Lanka Coast Guard Rear Admiral Sirimewan Ranasinghe also participated in the exercise.[mappress mapid=”14308″]Press release, Image: Sri Lanka Navy View post tag: Coastguard View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today SLNS Samudura Participates in Coastguard Exercise Off Male November 4, 2014 View post tag: Male Authorities Share this article View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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USS Ralph Johnson to be commissioned in namesake’s hometown

first_img USS Ralph Johnson to be commissioned in namesake’s hometown Authorities The commissioning ceremony for future USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) will take place in the late hero’s hometown of Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced January 11.The ship is named for Marine Pfc. Ralph Henry Johnson, a native of Charleston, who posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during the Vietnam War.Johnson used his body to shield two fellow Marines from a grenade, absorbing the blast and dying instantly in March 1968.Ralph Johnson is the 64th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, and the 30th DDG 51 class destroyer built by the Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) shipyard.The ship was launched at the Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi, Dec. 12, 2015.A date for the commissioning ceremony is yet to be determined, the navy said.USS Ralph Johnson is a Flight IIA destroyer that will be equipped with Aegis Baseline 9 which incorporates integrated air and missile defense and enhanced ballistic missile defense capabilities. January 12, 2017 View post tag: USS Ralph Johnson Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Ralph Johnson to be commissioned in namesake’s hometown Share this article View post tag: Arleigh Burke-class View post tag: US Navylast_img read more

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Orthopedic Hand Surgeon

first_imgKnowledge, Skills, and Abilities Strong organizational skillsAbility to multi-taskStrong interpersonal communication skillsAbility to work well independently to build clinicalpractice Board certified/board eligible Orthopedic Surgeon with asub-specialty in hand surgery.Must be eligible for licensure in the state of MarylandMust have training or extensive experience in hand surgeryAll incumbents must have completed a one year handfellowship1-6 years related experience, title of (Assistant/AssociateProfessor) will be contingent on years of experience Clinical experience/interest in treating pathology of the elbowin addition to hand, wrist and forearm.Strong interest in educationBackground in researchExperience in using Epic software A cover letter of application which specifically addresses thejob requirements and outlines qualifications;A current CV or resume;3 References to include: name, title, organization, telephonenumbers, email address of each reference. *Please be advised thatthe University does check references as part of the employmentprocess. Preferred Qualificationscenter_img The Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Special Instructions to Applicants:Applications are accepted electronically ONLY. Resumes sent withoutthe electronic application and required supporting documents willnot be reviewed. Please do not submit any of your applicationmaterial (via email) to the job posting contact. Review ofapplications will begin on 8/11/2020,and will continue until theposition is filled. Questions on how to complete the electronicapplication ONLY should be directed to Cynthia Payne, HR Manager [email protected] Application Materials:When submitting an application for consideration, applicants mustinclude: Johns Hopkins is Maryland’s largest private employer. Johns HopkinsUniversity, as the nation’s first research institution, offers amultitude of unique and varied career options are anything but“academic.” Our employees serve in areas as diverse asindividualized health, the science of learning, big data, the fateof our urban centers, the challenges of water scarcity, space andcosmology, global health, and so much more.At Johns Hopkins, you can explore ideas that interest you, findpeople who inspire and challenge you, and make discoveries thatchange your life and the world. The Johns Hopkins School ofMedicine consistently ranks among the nation’s very best ineducation. We’re a community of seekers and dreamers, using thelatest tools and teachings available to scientists and doctors. Weare proud to be a community of healers, caregivers, discoverers andinventors.The Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the Johns HopkinsUniversity School of Medicine, is seeking a board certified/boardeligible Orthopedic Surgeon with a sub-specialty in Hand surgerywith demonstrated commitment to patient care and enthusiasm forcreating an inclusive learning and working environment. We highlyvalue the ability to engage effectively with students, faculty andstaff of diverse backgrounds because our tripartite mission is todeliver quality, compassionate patient care, advance the field ofOrthopedics through research, and train the next generation ofhealth experts.All candidates must have completed at least one year of fellowship,have an interest in developing a clinical practice, contribute toresearch endeavors, and participate in our resident/fellowshipeducation program. This position is primarily based at our GreenSpring Station location and working at the Johns Hopkins Hospital,East Baltimore Medical Campus and Howard County General Hospital.This position will also be credentialed at all regional ambulatorysurgery centers.Examples of Work Performed:The candidate will provide medical services in both the inpatientand outpatient environments. Clinical responsibilities includeactively participating in continued growth of the Hand Surgeryprograms at the JHU School of Medicine. Teaching responsibilitiesinclude participating in the education of Orthopedic Surgeryresidents, fellows, and medical students. Research responsibilitiesinclude actively pursuing and participating in research activitiesas well as mentoring residents and other faculty in researchendeavors. Required to take emergency call for hand surgery.Salary and Benefits:Johns Hopkins University provides generous leave, health plans andretirement contributions that add to your bottom line. This is afull time position eligible for a full benefits package. Academicrank and salary will be commensurate with the level of expertiseand academic credentials.Johns Hopkins is dedicated to ensuring a safe and secureenvironment for our faculty, staff, students and visitors. Toassist in achieving that goal, we conduct background checks for allnew employees prior to their employment.You may review benefits for faculty here: https://hr.jhu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/FT-Fac-Exec.pdf Diversity and Inclusion:Johns Hopkins University and the Department of Orthopedic Surgeryare committed to recruiting and supporting a diverse student body,faculty and administrative staff. The University strives to promotea culture of inclusiveness, respect, communication andunderstanding. We encourage applications from women, ethnicminorities, persons with disabilities and all veterans. We arecommitted to diversity and equality in education and employment.Youmay learn more about our commitment to diversity here: https://diversity.jhu.edu/Minimum Requirementslast_img read more

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COWBOY UP!

first_imgCOWBOY UP!Gavel Gamut By Jim RedwineBefore October 4, 1957, when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1 American boys knew who they admired and what they wanted to be, cowboys. From the days of Hoot Gibson and Tom Mix to Hopalong Cassidy and the Durango Kid until Gene Autry and Roy Rogers boys of all backgrounds dreamed the same dream. Then America watched as our global boogeyman leapfrogged over us and put us in fear of destruction from above. Cowboys’ six guns became obsolete and American boys, girls too, dreamed of being astronauts. John Glenn orbited the earth aboard a new fire-breathing steed and from 1957 until Clint Eastwood’s movie The Good, The Bad and The Ugly that came out in 1966 during the throes of the Viet Nam War American boys left cowboys in the dust. However, since this is America, a sense of emergency and panic can only be maintained a short while before we revert to our roots.As a one-time American boy, I made the same progression. I fell back from my completely unrealistic dream of becoming a physicist to my only somewhat unrealistic, albeit subdued and hidden yearning, to be a cowboy. Returning to the days of Gene Autry was much easier than facing the reality that I will not be helping to settle Mars. However, the declining dreams of a young boy are themselves sometimes painful to reconstruct when one is separated from them by time. But the fates did recently allow me an opportunity to kind of revisit those thrilling days of yesteryear. I got to herd one cow.Now, when I was playing cowboys and Indians with the neighborhood boys in Pawhuska, Osage County, Oklahoma in the 1950’s several of my friends were, in fact, real Indians and several of them were, in fact, the sons of real cowboys. Of course, since we boys had not yet had the advantage of adult myopia we were unaffected by the niceties of who was supposed to be what. We all were whatever the scenario we thought up called for. Alas, we grew up, sort of.However, let me return to my recent opportunity to turn back the clock to the dreams of grade school days. When Peg and I bought a cabin in rural Osage County a few months ago we not only found a new home but also a new friend who was the prior owner and a real cowboy. How lucky was that? Anyway, Johnny runs some cattle on our place and those cattle are like the rest of us; they do not always stay put. Occasionally a cow will find its way out onto the public road. Such was the case yesterday. So, as my brother and I were heading to Bartlesville about 20 miles from our cabin to run errands for Peg, we encountered a large black cow with a white face happily munching on the right-of-way bluestem grass. I saw my chance to live that five-year-old boy’s dreams.I jumped out of my pickup and approached that cow with a confidence that can only come from ignorance. As I got closer and closer to the bovine behemoth, instead of her fearing me as I anticipated she took the attitude of a large animal upset by someone interrupting her dinner. Having neither horse nor rope nor the ability to use either had I had them I retreated and called for backup on my cell phone.“Johnny, it’s Jim. One of your cows is out.”“Jim, I’m in Oklahoma City.”“Johnny, what the devil do you want me to do?”“Why, nothing Jim, unless you want to. I’ll be back in The Osage in a few hours and I’ll deal with it. This is cowboy work.”Well, Johnny is obviously a true psychologist as that last statement cut deep into my boyhood psyche. I just clicked off my phone and girded my loins up about me as I ran towards Miss Bossie and waved my arms. Apparently, she was so amused she decided to amble back into her pasture and I shut the gate behind her.Now I know some of you Gentle Readers are probably thinking this event may not be quite as impressive as The Lone Ranger cleaning out a nest of rustlers. But to me, it’s just a matter of degree. They both qualify for cowboy status. My dreams have finally come true. I’m going to buy a hat and boots and find a drugstore where I can prop my boots up on the bar rail, tip my hat back and sip sarsaparilla.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.comOr “Like” us on Facebook at JPegRanchBooks&KnittingFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Timmy’s lands upmarket pie deal

first_imgAt less than a year old, pie business Timmy’s Pies is celebrating a deal to supply its six-strong range to top-end department store Harvey Nichols.Timmy’s Pies began life on the Duke of York market, London, in April last year, with founder Timmy Wilkes making the decision to upscale and rent premises at a professional kitchen in the summer.Wilkes told British Baker that another producer, working from the same premises, currently supplied Harvey Nichols and was aware its food buyer was looking for someone to supply it with some new and interesting pies.Wilkes said the buyer especially liked the seasonal approach he took with his menu. His pies change with the four seasons, with the current range featuring hare ragu and mushroom; wild boar and apple; slow cooked beef with chilli; and a chicken, leek and tarragon.The firm has just delivered the first order to the retailer, currently only 20-30 pies a week, but Wilkes is hoping to grow this order in the future. Timmy’s Pies also supplies Union Market, in Fulham Broadway, and has just started selling pies to The People’s Supermarket in Londonlast_img read more

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South Bend Cubs looking to put cardboard cutouts in the stands until tickets can…

first_img South Bend Cubs looking to put cardboard cutouts in the stands until tickets can be sold Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend MarketSports By Tommie Lee – March 30, 2021 0 256 Pinterest Facebook Google+ Twitter Pinterest (photo/South Bend Cubs) The South Bend Cubs are offering fans the chance to hang out in the stands as cardboard cutouts before tickets are made available for the 2021 season.The Cubs Cutouts will be in rows A and B at Four Winds Field during home games, but only a limited number will be available. Fans can pose alone, with family members, friends or even pets in their photos.Each cutout is only 30 dollars. Orders must be received by April 19t to have your cutout in the stands for Opening Night on May 4th.You can learn more by clicking here. Previous articleNotre Dame announces plan to vaccinate studentsNext articleCOVID is costing Michigan teachers at an alarming rate Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Speech: Amanda Spielman’s speech at the ASCL annual conference 2018

first_imgSet out like that, it should be clear that it’s only in my power to change one of these things directly – and only half of one at that! But nevertheless I want to turn to what we can do to ensure that inspection does not generate unnecessary workload.To start with, we have been clear about what we actually look at on inspection and, more importantly, what we don’t. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, we do not want to see a performance on inspection. We do not want anything special to be created. We do not want you to produce “Ofsted-ready files”. And, above all, we do not want you to employ consultants to perform mocksteds.What we want to see on inspection is an accurate reflection of what happens in your school. Yes, we want to see how you approach assessment. We want to see good teaching. We absolutely want to be sure that your leadership is effective. But we want to see all of that just as you approach it day-to-day, not as a special presentation for Ofsted.Some of you will say I’m naïve; others might use more choice words, if I were to suggest that we can make inspection a low stress event just like any other day. Fair enough.After all, if you were to say to your pupils: “Oh, don’t worry about that GCSE or that A-Level; it’s just a reflection of what you’ve learnt”, you’d get a similar response.Inspections will always to some degree induce anxiety, which might lead to stress: that’s human nature. You want to give the best account of your work. But most inspections are for just a day, so that stress shouldn’t build up for weeks and months before. If your school is working well week in, week out, you will get a good Ofsted judgement regardless of how much preparation you put into it.I really hope that you do listen when we try to bust specific myths about inspection. I am sure many of you already follow the one-man, Twitter myth-busting machine that is Sean Harford, and if you don’t then you probably should.I won’t repeat all of those individual myths here today, except to say that, when you see a myth being busted, please make sure your staff know it as well. Few things are more depressing to me than reading the results of our latest teacher survey and finding that most teachers still think we have a preferred style of teaching. Significant minorities think we still grade individual lessons or want to see lesson plans. In truth, we cannot reach every teacher directly, but through you, we can.At the same time, if there are new myths emerging, let us know and we will be more than happy to take steps to bust them. Even though I am sure Sean’s wife would appreciate it if he spent slightly fewer evenings playing triple-marking whack-a-mole.So that’s the myths, what about the reality?Well, we are also trying to make sure that the process of inspection is as painless as possible. Since January, we have been running a new model for short inspections of good schools. The early feedback from those inspections is very positive, and I want to thank Steve Rollett here for his work in helping us get this model right.Underpinning our new approach is our belief that it is better to catch an institution before it falls, than to give it an immediate requires improvement judgement. The new model gives those with a few areas of weakness time to improve, before we return for a full inspection. In the meantime, there should be no confusion: your ‘good’ judgement remains, and you avoid the consequences that can flow from an RI [requires improvement] grade.There will be times when we find more severe weaknesses or where our risk assessment model indicates that a school could be experiencing a major decline. In those situations, it is right that a full inspection happens immediately. But, for schools with just a handful of areas to improve, we think the right approach is to give them the time to do so.In a similar vein, we have removed the 3 strikes rule. There was a presumption that a school should be graded inadequate, if after two RI outcomes a third inspection did not show that it had improved to good. Instead, we are letting our inspectors use their discretion to judge a school as it stands, regardless of its inspection history.Other steps we have taken include a new approach to safeguarding. In training our inspectors this year, we have moved away from a compliance approach. I’m thinking here, for example, of stories of fences being too low. Instead, we want our inspectors to look at whether a good safeguarding culture runs throughout the school. Fewer tick boxes; more focus on how schools identify risks of serious harm, and help young people to be safe.We’ve also stopped reporting on performance management arrangements. Inspectors are not requesting anonymised lists of teachers who did or didn’t achieve an increment on the pay scale.And that leads me on to one of my biggest bugbears in the world of education; the misuse of data. Anyone who has ever worked with me will know that I’m not averse to a bit of analysis. Evidence-based approaches to education are the right approaches. I don’t believe that an HMI can walk into a school, take a quick sniff and come to an instant judgement.But that doesn’t mean that our inspectors should need, or want, to see endless pages of data, cut to the nth degree on 10 different pupil characteristics. The other day I was horrified to see an example from a school of a pie-chart of pupil performance data based on the results of 3 pupils. Torturing data is not just pointless. There is work in creating those analyses. There is work in discussing them and all too often many of the differences they may seem to show are probably just statistical noise. And there is work in designing and delivering interventions to address those apparent differences, and some of those aren’t really justified. And I know that some of it happens because we have tended to over-analyse data too.So we have been working on this one too. Our intention is always to use data as the starting point, not as the end point, for inspection. We have redesigned inspection data reports to reduce the likelihood of over-interpretation. We have trained our inspectors to know what inferences they can and cannot draw from the data. And since September, we have operated a new analyst helpdesk to support inspectors.There are also more direct measures looking at workload. In September, we added a new question to our staff questionnaire. It asks whether ‘Leaders and managers take workload into account when developing and implementing new policies and procedures, so as to avoid placing unnecessary burdens on staff’. Quite a mouthful.But, I can now share the first results from that question. Only 8% of staff disagreed or disagreed strongly, which I am sure will come as some encouragement to you. In fact 77% agreed or agreed strongly that leaders do take workload into account.Of course, there is an inevitable bias to the positive in this question. Few people want to jeopardise their school’s inspection. So we are looking at how we can best use this question. On inspection itself, we are not using the responses to downgrade leadership and management. We are using them as part of the discussion with leaders about the way they run their schools.I am loath to go any further, just at the moment, to commit Ofsted to directly judging leaders’ approach to workload. I am sure there is room for us to look at more under the leadership and management judgement. But adding something to the Ofsted framework never has a subtle impact. Unless we think through our approach carefully, perverse incentives will follow. And the very last thing I want is for Ofsted to become a wedge between staff and management. So I am not ruling out taking a closer look at workload on inspection, but I want to do this gradually, and in discussion with the sector.That takes me to the final area where I see scope for us to tackle workload. That is through the new education inspection framework that my team is developing for 2019.A top priority for me is to make sure that the framework explores the things that either give a good judgement of educational effectiveness or are vital to young people’s development. The alternative is a giant basket full of things that dilute the validity of our judgement and create lots of extra work for you.To give you a flavour, here are just some of the things that have been suggested for inclusion in the Ofsted framework in the past year: volunteering gang education school meal quality swimming capability home cooking skills first aid school to school collaboration knife awareness resilience democratic engagement the curriculum survey, which is helping us to define what a good curriculum looks like, in terms of intent, and implementation and impact international research on lesson observation, and what can and cannot be gleaned from it a review of book scrutiny practice and, again, what it can and what it cannot tell inspectors about standards in a school broader work on the validity and reliability of our inspections and the link with educational effectiveness and finally, in response to feedback from teachers – a research programme on workload and well-being, focused on schools that manage this well. Can I start by saying how pleased I am to be here today. Those of you who were at last year’s conference may remember that it was my first big speech as Chief Inspector. I used that speech to lay out some of my priorities for Ofsted and what I hoped to achieve. So it’s great to be back here today to present my own self-evaluation for year one. I got some feedback from some of you last night, and look forward to getting more today.What a year it has been. I’m a strong believer that chief inspectors and politics don’t mix, so I won’t dwell on some of the more high profile events of the past year. But even in our own world of education we’ve seen some major changes, including the arrival of both Geoff and Damian.I must admit there was some trepidation in Ofsted Towers at Geoff’s election. I think it’s fair to say the platform he ran on wasn’t entirely ‘Ofsted friendly’. But since taking up office, we’ve found him to be – yes, tough and determined – but also constructive and pragmatic. Working together, we’ve already been able to find solutions to some thorny issues and I think there’s much more we can do in future.Returning to the substanceLast year I made clear my desire for all of us to shift our focus back to the ‘substance of education’. The question I asked was: how do we make sure our efforts are directed at giving young people a knowledge-rich education that sets them up to succeed, as opposed to hunting for performance table prizes and stickers. It’s a theme I continued throughout the year, developed through a big research programme looking at the curriculum in schools and in colleges.I have been genuinely thrilled with the debate and discussion that have followed. Although I know not everyone has agreed with all of our conclusions, many have and there is an almost universal agreement that the essential diagnosis is right. For too long, the curriculum – the thing that should lie at the heart of educational thinking – has come second to the pressures of accountability and performance tables.Ofsted has of course played its part here: we haven’t put enough emphasis on curriculum in the framework and, as a result, may have contributed to a vicious cycle, whereby schools have done the same.I am pleased that ASCL recognises many of these issues. I have enjoyed sitting on your commission on ethical leadership, which I know has reported at this conference. Its emphasis on making sure school leaders make the right decisions, for the right reasons, is entirely correct.Here, I have to put in my usual disclaimer, lest there be any mischief from our friends in the education press. I am not opposed to accountability: indeed it would be a rather odd position for the head of an inspectorate to take. I think that Progress 8, new SATs, GCSEs and A-Levels are broadly good things. But I do maintain that success in these measures should flow from a rich curriculum, rather than tests of all kinds and performance tables dictating the curriculum itself.Spending time on the right thingsSo today I want to continue that theme of the substance of education, but from a different perspective. Following on from Geoff, I want to look at how Ofsted can play its part in reducing workload, so that you’re able to focus on the things that matter to you and to your pupils.Because, at the end of the day, it really doesn’t matter what an inspectorate thinks if we can’t attract good people into teaching. The record number of good and outstanding schools won’t be sustained if the people, who make them run so well, are burning out, and leaving the profession.When I see NQTs brimming with passion to change young lives for the better, I think it’s an utter travesty that so many end up losing their early enthusiasm because of the pressures of the job. Especially when so many of those pressures are entirely unnecessary.Because that’s what endless data cuts, triple marking, 10 page lesson plans, and, worst of all, mocksteds are: a distraction from the core purpose of education. And a costly distraction at that. Many will say that these have been driven by Ofsted and the wider accountability framework, not by school and college leaders themselves, and I’ll come to that in a minute. But, as Geoff has said so clearly, ethical leadership is what should drive your actions.That said, clearly Ofsted isn’t blameless and we must go on doing all we can to support removing unnecessary workload for teachers and school leaders. So I want to talk about some of the steps that we have been taking to cut out the guff and direct the focus back to what matters.I want this to be a frank discussion. Because, we know there is no silver bullet. As I see it, there are 5 major drivers of workload: Government policies and requirements, which schools and teachers must follow. Accountability through performance tables and inspection. The consequences of accountability – what governing bodies, LAs, MATs or RSCs do as a result of an Ofsted judgement or a set of results. The fear of litigation if schools do not take a belt and braces approach, particularly on things like health and safety. And finally, how policies and accountability measures are translated by school leaders into day-to-day management tools such as policies for planning, assessment and marking. And there are many more. Don’t get me wrong, I think all of these are valuable suggestions. But every time we add something to our framework, we dilute the focus on the substance of education and we create more work for schools. So I intend to make sure that the new framework is as sharply focused as possible on the things that matter most.The framework development is supported by our research programme, which currently includes: I hope you can see from the steps we are taking, that I do not believe excessive workload is inevitable! I know that you, and all the dedicated professionals who work for you, will always want to go above and beyond for young people. But what we can do is to make sure that you’re going above and beyond for the right reasons.And that does mean you as school and college leaders playing your part – and Geoff has talked eloquently about that today. You have to take tough decisions in your institutions all the time. Some of those decisions create work, that’s inevitable. But when you do take them, please be clear why you are taking them, and accept where the responsibility is yours. In the long run, to do anything else only undermines confidence and morale.Thank you for listening today, and for the opportunity to share a platform with Geoff and Damian. I am really confident that by working together we can make a real difference and make sure that teaching is the attractive, challenging and rewarding profession it deserves to be.Thank you.last_img read more